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Full text of "Selection of hymns and poetry : for the use of infant and juvenile schools and families"

FROM THE LIBRARY OF 
REV. LOUIS FITZGERALD BENSON, D. D. 

BEQUEATHED BY HIM TO 

THE LIBRARY OF 

PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Division ! ^>C>-Jo 

/(/SCO 



Section 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/selecOOIond 






. i aw 221036 
A SELECTION 






HYMNS AND POETRY, 



FOR THE USE OF 



INFANT AND JUVENILE SCHOOLS 
AND FAMILIES. 

IN FIVE PARTS. 



PREPARED AT THE REQUEST OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE 
HOME AND COLONIAL SCHOOL SOCIETY. 



.if tftf) Oitton, 

ENLARGED BY MANY ORIGINAL PIECES. 



LONDON: 
R. GROOMBRIDGE & SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW; 

INFANT SCHOOL DEPOSITORY, GRAY'S INN ROAD. 
M DCCCLIII. 



PRINTED BY I. CHAPMAN, 
STAR STREET, EDGWARE ROAD, PADDINGTON. 



PREFACE 

TO THE FIRST EDITION. 



This little volume, consisting of pieces partly 
original, but chiefly selected from the works of 
Dr. Watts, Miss Taylor, and other approved writers 
for the young, has been prepared at the request of 
the Home and Colonial Infant School Society ; and 
the Committee hope it will be found useful as an 
assistant to teachers of infant schools, as well as to 
parents and governesses, who have the charge of 
young children. 

It is the desire of the Committee that the plea- 
sure children so generally find in verse should be 
early consecrated to the Lord, and in consequence 
most of the little poetical pieces convey some pious 
or moral sentiment, or tend to impress some reli- 
gious truth. A few verses have been admitted for 
the mere purpose of affording amusement and cheer- 
ful relaxation to the very young ; but, in general, 
even the lighter pieces aim at the cultivation of the 
kindly affections, or lead to that taste for the beau- 
ties of nature, which, when combined with a grate- 
ful perception of the wisdom and goodness of the 
Creator, is so rich a source of gratification, and so 
beneficial to the human mind. 

ISo pieces are inserted on arithmetic, geography. 
&c, as it is considered that the knowledge of such 
subjects can be much better imparted by direct 
lessons. 

The work is divided into fixe parts, and the 
easier hymns and verses are arranged in the two 
first, so that the infant-school teacher will find Q< 
difficulty in making a suitable choice. The third 
part consists of portions of Scripture history in 
A 2 



IV PREFACE. 

verse, and may be used in connexion with Scripture 
prints, to impress the subject on the minds of the 
children. 

In the fourth and fifth parts a few pieces of a 
higher character have been introduced, as well with 
reference to the nursery and school-room of the 
upper classes, as to children above the age of seven. 

The Committee entertain a hope also that the 
system of early instruction will, ere long, be more 
extensively introduced into the manufacturing dis- 
tricts, where it is now so difficult to obtain the 
attendance of children at school after they have 
entered the factories ; and they confidently expect, 
that when the existing law which precludes the 
employment of children in these factories under the 
age of nine is duly enforced, and when parents 
actually witness the improvement of their offspring, 
and reap the benefit of their more orderly and 
obedient habits at home, they will allow them to 
remain at the infant-school until a later period than 
is at present usual. 

The Committee desire to present their acknow- 
ledgments to those friends who have kindly supplied 
original pieces ; and, as the second and third parts 
are still deficient, they would be glad to receive 
contributions for another edition. 

It is the earnest prayer of the Editor, that the 
gracious Lord of all may condescend to bless this 
humble effort to feed his lambs, and so abundantly 
pour forth his Spirit on the rising generation, and 
on all who seek their good, that precious fruit may 
be gathered unto life eternal, and that both those 
who sow, and those who reap, may rejoice together 
in the kingdom of their Father. 

Model Schools, 

Gray's Inn Road, near King's Cross, 

September 17th, 1838. 



PREFACE 

TO THE SECOND EDITION. 



In preparing a second edition of this little work for 
the press, the Editor has to regret the necessity of 
leaving out many excellent and suitable hymns by 
Miss Taylor and Mrs. Gilbert. The present selec- 
tion is still enriched with some of their pieces, but 
the large number previously introduced was ob- 
jected to as an encroachment upon the copyright. 

The Editor has carefully revised the book, and 
hopes that it will be found on the whole to have 
materially increased in value ; many original pieces 
of great merit having been kindly contributed by 
friends, among whom she desires gratefully to men- 
tion the names of Miss Thrupp and Miss Stodart. 

September 17 th, 1840. 



PREFACE 

TO THE THIRD EDITION. 



The alterations in the third edition will chiefly be 
found in the fourth and fifth parts, which have been 
considerably enlarged to meet the capacities of the 
Juvenile School, added to the Infant School since 
the publication of the last edition. 

It is hoped that parents and teachers will find a 



PREFACE. 

sufficient variety of pieces to instruct and please all 
the young members of their respective circles ; and 
that the volume, as now prepared, may be found 
useful not only in Infant Schools, but in those also 
for older children. 

In a few instances hymns have been slightly 
altered, and the language of assurance and ex- 
perience exchanged for that of hope and prayer ; 
the Editor feeling anxious that children's early 
affections should be associated, and their memories 
stored, with hymns calculated to be valuable to 
'them in after-life, and yet deeming it undesirable to 
give them expressions to which the heart, at their 
age, can scarcely be expected to respond. 

The Editor has introduced a few extracts from 
" The Great Exemplar" and " Creation," two in- 
teresting and excellent little books, by M. B. Tuckey, 
which she strongly recommends to the attention of 
parents and teachers. 

An index of subjects has been added for the 
convenience of teachers. 

October 17th, 1845. 



NOTIC E. 



The Editor lias been requested to mem ion that the 
hymns, & . Belected from "Hymns for Infant 
Minds," "Original Poems," and "Nursery Rhymes," 
have been introduced by permission of the owners 
of the copyrights, to whom payment has been made 
for the privilege. 

July 25th, 1849. 



NOTICE 

TO THE FIFTH EDITION. 



Mr. Lowell Mason, of Boston, having given 
gratuitous instruction in singing to a class of the 
Children in the Home and Colonial Schools to their 
great delight and improvement, and having kindly 
permitted the Editor to insert some of the songs in 
this volume, a selection from " The Primary School 
Song Book" and "The Song Book of the School 
Room" will be found in the Appendix. 

May 9th, 1853. 



TABLE OF FIRST LINES. 



Hymns 

Abide with me ! fast falls the eventide 239 

A father — for he bore that sacred name 314 

A good and gentle child 146 

A grain of corn an infant's hand 144 

Ah ! little lark, I see you there 100 

Ah ! that such beauty varying in the light 290 

A little bird I am 339 

A little captive maiden stood 168 

A little child, she read a book 308 

A little girl, named Annie Gray 150 

A little ship was on the sea 176 

Almighty God, I'm very ill 57 

Almighty God ! thy name I praise 7 

Along life's road no parent's hand 237* 

Amid the dying and the dead 159 

And hast thou left each darling sin 334 

And was my Saviour once a child 35 

Angry words are lightly spoken . . 328 

Another night of sweet repose 192 

Another six days' work is done 199 

" A penny I have" 145 

A poor afflicted child, I kneel 62 

Around the throne of God in heaven 66 

Around the fire, one wintry night 137 

As at the fall of night 197 

Ashamed of Jesus ? Can it be 233 

As the winged arrow flies 242* 

As when the Hebrew prophet raised 172 

At anchor laid, remote from home 294 

At early dawn the Pastor rose , 318 

At early morn to plough he goes 69 

At the corner of Wood Street, when day-light appears 256 

A watchful eye looks from above 42 

Away with needless sorrow 78 

A widowed mother lost her son 175 

Ay, there's the squirrel perched aloft 97 

Barren and lonely is the desert strand 183 

Before the bright sun rises over the hill 134 

Behold the spot on which Capernaum stands 174 

Beneath a green bank glistening 275 

Beneath Moriah's rocky side 276 

Beside the lowly cottage gate 136 

Bird of the stormy wave ! bird of the sea 257 

Blessings on our youthful Queen 307* 



TABLE OF FIRST LINES. IX 

Hymns 

Bound on a voyage of awful length 293 

Brightest and best of the sons of the morning 321* 

Brothers and sisters are a gift 1 31 * 

Buttercups and daisies 110 

Camel, thou art good and mild 246 

Captain of Israel's host, and guide 

Children go to and fro 71 

Children, who have seen the sea 298 

Christ is merciful and mild 1 

Christ, whose glory fills the skies 226 

Come, Holy Spirit, come 14 

Come, Holy Spirit, heavenly Dove 234 

Come, let us join our cheerful songs 230* 

Come, let us join our friends above 344 

Come, let us search God's holy word 34 

Come, little brother, come with me 92 

Come, see how fast the weather clears 126* 

Come, see our new garland so green and so gay. . . . 113* 

Come, sister, let us haste to school 80 

Come to the house of prayer 201 

Come, trembling mourners, dry your tears 166 

Dear " children," there was once on earth 129 

Devout and earnest is the voice of prayer 185* 

Did I this morn devoutly pray 327 

Does each day upon the wing 333 

Does God stoop down to hear 2 

Down in a green and shady bed Ill 

Draw me, my Saviour, after thee 229 

Faint on Rephaim's sultry side 164 

Fair as the sunny beams of light 214 

Fair tree of winter ! fresh and flowering 269 

Far, far from Zion, far from God 142 

Far, far o'er hill and dale 119 

Father of mercy, hear our prayers 40 

Father ! whate'er of earthly bliss 238 

For ears to hear my God I'll praise 29 

For mercies countless as the sands 216 

For our sabbath peace we bless thee 203 

From everything our Saviour saw 122 

From Greenland's icy mountains , . , 220 

Get up, little sister, the morning is bright 115 

Glad to see you, little bird 106 

Glory to thee, my God, this night 194 

God did not make the lovely day 139* 

God gave to Afric's sons 53 

God is good ! the pleasant flowers 87 

God is in heaven ! — can he hear 3 

God loves the little child that prays 16 



X TABLE OF FIRST LINES. 

Hymns 

God made me too with curious art , 23 

God made the world in which we live 27 

God made the world — in every land 211 

God might Lave bade the earth bring forth 265 

God reigns in glory, and on high 41 

God spake to Moses face to face 157* 

God's people once in Egvpt were 157 

Go forth, %o forth, my child, and bring 268 

Good Daniel would not cease to pray 169 

Go when the morning- shineth 316 

Great God, and wilt thou condescend 32 

Great God, 'tis written in thy book 208 

Great God, with wonder and with praise 213 

Happiness, thou lovely name 341 

Happy the child, whose youngest years 38 

' Happy the home, when God is there 50 

Hark! hark! the lark, with fluttering wing 101 

Hark ! heard ye not that loud and startling shriek . . 313 

Hark ! the herald angels sing 244 

Hark ! the old church bell is booming 84 

Have you ever heard of a dear little bird 102 

Heaven speed the canvass, gallantly unfurled 301* 

He loved the world that hated him ; the tear 309 

Here we suffer grief and pain 63 

He stands a stripling slight and small 163 

He walks with God, who lives a life of faith 337 

High on a throne of light, O Lord 210 

How beautiful the morning 116 

How bright these glorious spirits shine 186* 

How cool, how sweet, the breeze of morn ........ 28 

How doth the little busy bee 91 

How fine has the day been ! how bright was the sun . 285 

How long, O Lord our Saviour 232* 

How long sometimes a day appears ^ ■ . . 52 

How pleasant to me thy deep blue wave 277 

How proud we are, how r fond to shew 135* 

How sweet, dear children, is the light SSS 

Hurrah ! hurrah for England 151 

If ever I see 98 

I have a little sister. , 70 

1 heard the voice of Jesus say 342 

I know that God is everywhere 240 

I know that my Redeemer lives 243 

I lay my sins on Jesus 229* 

I'll never hurt my little dog 93 

I love to think of heaven, where I shall meet 346 

I love to sit bv the side of the shore 295 

I marked at eve the snow flakes fall 124 



TABLE OF FIRST LINES. XI 

Hymns 

I'm a helpless crippled child 140* 

Tin very glad the spring is come — the sun shines out 

so bright 117 

I must not tease my mother 132 

I must not throw upon the floor 8.5 

I need not, dearest children, tell 130 

In every object here 1 see 296 

In happy boyhood they had played 153 

In nature's all-instructive book 260 

I prayed to God, be heard my prayer ............ 59 

I sat upon a bank and read 258 

I saw a little streamlet flow 273 

I saw a little girl 149 

I saw the glorious sun arise 25 

I saw a sportive butterfly 259 

I see an old man sitting there 139 

I sing th' almighty power of God 21 

I sing the wonders grace can do 186 

Israel, in ancient days 212 

I stood upon a place called earth 280 

I thank the goodness and the grace 54 

It happened on a solemn eventide 182 

I have an evil heart within 43 

I think, when I read that sweet storv of old 37 

"It is finished!" Shall we raise .. ". 230 

It was my heavenly Father's love 24 

It wins my admiration 252 

I've been roaming, I've been roaming 305 

I've been seeking fresh flowers,white, yellow and blue 266 

I was a wandering sheep 343 

I wish to be like Jesus 15 

I would not be a cruel boy 99 

Jesus, Lord, we look to thee 49 

Jesus, lover of my soul 225* 

Jesus, tender shepherd, hear me 18* 

Jesus was passing by 178 

Jesus, who bade the tempest cease 206 

Jesus, who lived above the sky 33 

Just and devout old Simeon lived 171 

Just as I am — without one plea 231 

Let me think — have I done one right action to-day. . 148 

Let us sing with one accord 06 

Let us sing, for we have reason 191 

Lift up the Gospel banner 303 

Light for the dreary vales 304 

Little bird, with bosom red 103 

Little children, never give 105 

Little children, can you say 128 

4 ' Little children, love each other" 131 



XU TABLE OF FIRST LINES. 

Hymns 

Little fly— little fly 90 

Lord ! as the rain comes down from heaven, — the rain. 282 

Lord ! hear a little infant pray 20 

Lord, how delightful 'tis to see 202 

Lord, if thou thy grace impart 206* 

Lord, I have passed another day 18 

Lord Jesus ! teach a child to pray 9 

Lord, look upon a little child 4 

Lord of light ! enthroned in glory 217 

Lord ! teach a little child to pray 8 

Lord ! to thee I lift mine eyes 5 

Lord ! when we bend before thy throne 190 

Lo ! seated on his mother's knees, a little child appears 1 67 

Mamma, let's go and see the lambs 95 

Man the life-boat ! man the life-boat ! 302 

May the grace of Christ our Saviour 235 

Monarch, pictured here in state 311 

Much will I prize God's holy book ..... 30 

My Father, hear the humble prayer 236 

My English home ! my English home 307 

My Father ! I am very ill 58 

My God, all nature owns thy sway 286 

My God, how endless is thy love 193 

My God ! my Father ! while I stray 238* 

My gracious Lord, I would not be 241 

My heavenly Father ! when to thee 10 

My little one, my little one 147 

Noble the mountain stream 274 

No one deserves to have a horse 96 

Now all is still around 254 

Now if the Lord should say to me 165 

Now let our heavenly plants and flowers 204 

Now let us march along 76 

Now let us watch our teacher's hands 81 

Now steadily, steadily, let us walk 77 

Oh ! are we not thankful for Bibles to read 55 

O come, let us go to the meadows 118 

Of the countless living things 262 

Oh can I hope, since Jesus wept 331 

Oh! could our senseless hearts but know 340 

" Oh, call my brother back to me" 141 

Oh for a heart to praise my God 189 

Oh, for a wise and serious mind 207 

Oh ! from the world's vile slavery 232 

Oh give not up the Bible 312 

Oh guide my feet, and keep them in the way 188* 

Oh ! how pleasant 'tis to see , . . . 74 

Oh, if some little heathen child 46 

Oh! I've gather'd a nosegay, so brilliant and bright. 113 



TABLE OF FIRST LINES. Xlll 

Hymns 

Oh ! let us praise our God above 127 

O merciful and gracious Lord 56 

Oh say, what is that thing called light 140 

Oh! that the Saviour's heavenly law 51 

Oh ! there are recollections 315* 

O thou, whose power o'er moving worlds presides . . 336 

O 'tis a lovely thing for youth 44 

Oh welcome the Autumn ! with fruits and with grains 289 

Oh when shall Erin's lovely isle 306 

Oh, who can give the blind their sight 225 

Oh ! who is like the God of grace 1 22* 

Oh ! who would keep a little bird confined 251 

Oh wonder past expression 228 

Old John had an apple-tree, healthy and green .... 138 

O Lord ! wilt thou teach me to pray 11 

O Lord, my sinful heart renew 45 

Once in the silence of the night 162 

One glance of thine, eternal Lord , 209 

On Filey Bridge I sat alone 300 

Only see, little girl, what a waste you have made .... 85* 

On Sunday it is Annie's rule 136* 

Open, Lord, our understanding 234* 

Opening the map of God's extensive plan 279 

Our God is good, and he is great 22 

Papa, mamma, are gone away 61 

Pleasant are thy courts above 200 

Plead thou, — oh, plead my cause 228* 

Poor and needy though I be 12 

Praise to God, immortal praise 218 

Prayer is the soul's sincere desire 187 

" Pray," said a mother to her dying child 315 

Pretty bud, I love to see 112 

Rock of Ages, cleft for me 227 

Roll on, thou mighty ocean 221 

Safely through another week 198 

Safe, sleeping on its mother's breast 133 

Saviour, like a shepherd lead us 39 

See in the west now sets the sun 196 

See, James, what a sweet little prize I have found . . 104 

See, my child, that mighty ocean 297 

See the chickens round the gate 108 

See the kind shepherd, Jesus, stands 224* 

See the kitten on the wall 249 

Shepherd of thy little flock 224 

Softly now the showers of rain 126 

Some murmur when their sky is clear 330 

So soberly and softly 272 

"Strangers!" " Pilgrims !" Is it so 

Sun, moon and stars, by day and night 26 



XIV TABLE OF FIRST LINES, 

Hymns 

Sweet to the morning traveller 320 

Swift the moments fly away 242 

Tell me, pretty swallow, tell 2.35 

Thank you, pretty cow, that made 94 

The air is chill, the rain falls fast 125 

The bird that soars on highest wing 253 

The children of an infant school 109 

The dew was falling fast, the stars began to blink . 247 

The flowers are blooming everywhere 114 

The glories of Summer and Autumn are fled 291 

The glorious sun, so dazzling bright 123 

The God of heaven is pleased to see 48 

The God of nature and of grace 219 

The golden and the crimson glow 205* 

The greenhouse is my summer seat 250 

The heart is hard in nature, and unfit 263 

The lapse of time and rivers is the same 278 

The leaves of autumn pass away 323 

The Lord is good, who gave to me 68 

The Maker and the Lord of all 261 

The Motherless! bend quietly 316 

The noon was shady, and soft airs 248 

The pretty little butterfly 89 

The priests just dip their feet 160 

The rain is falling very fast 72 

There is a fountain rilled with blood 227* 

There is an ear that listening bends 325 

There is an eye that never sleeps 324 

There is a path that leads to God 188 

There is beyond the sky 65 

There lives and works 271 

The Saviour stood by him in pain 310 

The Son of God, to save us 244* 

The spacious firmament on high 284 

The sun had reached his mid-day height 270 

The sun is ris'n again 205 

The wanderer no more will roam 231* 

The withering flash has struck the fruitful tree .... 185 

This book is all that's left me now 316* 

This is God's most holy day 19* 

This is the day when Christ arose 19 

Thou art my way, let me abide 226* 

Though quarrels may disturb the street 47 

Through the burning wastes we've wandered 158 

Through the day thy love hath spared us 195 

Thus we sing as we march, and we march as we sing 73 

" Thy kingdom come ;" from day to day 222 

'Tis a solemn tiling to pray 187* 

'Tis a lesson you should heed 83 



TABLE OF FIRST LINES. XV 

Hymns 

'Tis religion that can give 67 

To Jacob's well a woman came 173 

Tossed with rough waves, aDd faint with fear 33.3 

Trust not yourself; but your defects to know 347 

'Twas when the sea, with awful roar 299 

Twinkle, twinkle, little star 86 

Twinkle, twinkle, little star 86* 

Two and two, and hand in hand 75 

Two travellers were on their way 155 

Up in the morning's cheerful light 79 

Upon a bed of sickness laid 107 

Victoria ! Victoria 152 

Wake ! the costly hours are fleeting 243* 

We come ! we come ! and ye feel our might 292 

We give immortal praise 245 

Welcome, Christmas ! welcome here 321 

We love thee, Lord, because when we 215* 

We speak of the land of the blest 345 

What are we in the scriptures told . 31 

Whatever passes as a cloud between 329 

What hand but His who arched the skies. 267 

What if the little rain should plead 264 

What is the world ? A wildering maze 312* 

When Abraham, at God's command 156 

When all thy mercies, O my God 215 

When evening in her crimson dye 180 

When I look up to yonder sky 13 

When infants sing Jehovah's praise 6 

When many people thronged to hear 177 

When morning comes, the birds arise 17 

When one that holds communion with the skies. . . . 338 
When parents once to Christ their children brought . 179 

When scorn and hate and bitter envious pride 181 

When the dark and heavy cloud 125* 

When the glorious sun is beaming 283 

When the overwhelming flood 154 

When winter winds are blowing 120 

Where shall the child of sorrow find 237 

While humble shepherds watch their flocks 170 

While Paul was sunk in slumber 143 

Who are they in heaven who stand 64 

Who fed me from her gentle breast 132* 

Who is it each day in the week may be seen 135 

" Who is the maiden that doth bend" 161 

Who is this with bearing high 1»4 

Who taught the bird to build her nest 88 

W 7 ho was it that so lately said 288 

White ermine now the mountains wear 287 

Why do you weep 60 



XVI TABLE OF FIRST LINES. 

Hymns 

Why gaze ye on my hoary hairs 317 

Why o'er yon peasant's weary, toilworn brow 319 

" Why waste the wheat I see you throw" 121 

Work while you work 82 

Yes — " all shall work for good" — to them that love . . 281 

Yes, home is a delightful word 319* 

Yon stately ship, so firmly built 301 



APPENDIX. 

A little word in love expressed 14 

All yonder in the meadow 6 

Behold us, Lord ! a youthful band 1 

Cold the blast may blow 11 

Days of summer glory 10 

Float away, float away 9 

Little streamlet, flowing near 5 

Lo ! the heavens are breaking 7 

Morn amid the mountains 8 

Morning light is coming 2 

Now to heaven our prayer ascending 13 

O, see the cunning frost again 12 

See, the light is fading 3 

See, the rain is falling • • . • 4 

She comes our path to lighten 15 



PART FIRST. 
HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 



1. 



THE LOWLINESS OF CHRIST. 



" For ye know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that, 
though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, 
that ye through his poverty might be rich." — 2 Cor. viii. 9. 

Christ is merciful and mild, 
He was once a little child ; 
He whom heavenly hosts adore, 
Lived on earth among the poor. 

Jesus laid his glory by, 
When for us he stooped to die ; 
How I wonder when I see 
His unbounded love to me ! 

He the sick to health restored : 
To the poor he preached the Word ; 
And let little children share 
' In his love and tender care. 

Every bird can build its nest, 
Foxes have their place of rest ; 
He by whom the world was made 
Had not where to lay his head. 

He who is the Lord most high, 
Then was poorer far than I, 
That I might hereafter be 
Rich to all eternity. 
n 



2. 



3. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART 

GOD LISTENS TO CHILDREN. 

Does God stoop down to hear 

What little children say ? 
Will he incline his ear 

To listen when I pray ? 

How happy should I feel, 
How thankful should I be ! 

Oh ! let me humbly kneel 
To God, who thinks of me. 

Let me his pardon seek, 

Let me his grace implore^ 
With joy his praises speak, 

And love him evermore. 



D. A. T. 



GOD IS IN HEAVEN. 



God is in heaven ! — can he hear 

A little prayer like mine ? 
Yes, thoughtful child, thou need'st not fear. 

He listens unto thine. 

God is in heaven ! can he see 

When I am doing wrong ? 
Yes, that he can ; he looks at thee 

All day, and all night long. 

God is in heaven ! — would he know 

If I should tell a He ? 
Yes, though thou saidst it very low, 

He'd hear it in the sky. 

God is in heaven ! — does he care, 

Or is he good to me ? 
Yes, all thou hast, to eat or wear, 

'Tis God that gives it thee. 

God is in heaven ! — can I go 

To thank him for his care ? 
Not yet ; but love him here below. 

And he will see it there. 



2 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

God is in heaven ! — may I pray 

To go there when I die ? 
Yes, seek his grace ; and then one day 

He'll call thee to the sky.* 

4. CHILDREN BY NATURE SINFUL. 

Lord, look upon a little child, 
By nature sinful, rude, and wild : 
Oh ! put thy gracious hands on me, 
And make me what I ought to be. 

Lord Jesus ! take me to thy breast, 
And bless me, that I may be blest ; 
Both when I wake and when I sleep, 
Thy little lamb in safety keep. 

5. PRAYER TO GOD. 

Lord ! to thee I lift mine eyes, 
Hands and heart I lift to thee ; 

Let my prayer accepted rise, 
Weak, imperfect, though it be. 

Teach me, Lord, thy name to know, 
Teach me, Lord, thy name to love ; 

May I do thy will below, 
As thy will is done above. 

When I lay me down at night, 
O'er me watch, and near me stay ; 

And when morning brings the light, 
May I wake to praise and pray. 



D. A. T. 



6. "HOLINESS UNTO THE LORD.' 

When infants sing Jehovah's praise, 
Solemn should be the notes they raise ; 
Each look, each thought, and every word, 
Be " Holiness unto the Lord." 

CHORUS. 

Holy, Holy, Holy, Holy is our God. 
* " Hymns for Infant-Schools." By Ann Gilbert. 
b2 3 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 

When infants bow the knee in prayer, 
The great, the holy God is there ; 
Then should not every thought and word 
Be " Holiness unto the Lord ? " — Holy, &c. 

Above, where happy angels dwell, 
Infants the heavenly chorus swell ; 
And there the feeblest note that's heard 
Is "Holiness unto the Lord." — Holy, &c. 

Then how must angels grieve to hear 
The thoughtless song — the heartless prayer ; 
Think, children, think, — let ev'ry word 
Be "Holiness unto the Lord." — Holy, &c. 

7. PRAISE TO GOD FOR MERCIES. 

Almighty God ! — thy name I praise 
For parents, teachers, Christian friends ; 

For peaceful nights and happy days, 
And every gift thy mercy sends. 

In praise to thee my heart I lift, 

But more than all Thy love has given, 

I bless thee for the wondrous gift 

Of Jesus Christ, our Lord from heaven. 

O may thy Spirit from above 

Stoop down and make my heart his care. 
And shed abroad a Saviour's love, 

And write his name and likeness there. 

D. A. T. 

g # PRAYER FOR A NEW HEART. 

" Create in me a clean heart, O God ; and renew a right 
spirit within me." — Ps. li. 10. 

Lord ! teach a little child to pray, 
Thy grace to me impart; 

And grant thy Holy Spirit may 
Renew my infant heart. 
1 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

A sinful creature I was born, 

And from my birth have strayed ; 

I must be wretched and forlorn 
Without thy mercy's aid. 

But Christ can all my sins forgive, 
And wash away their stain ; 

Can fit my soul with him to live, 
And in his kingdom reign. 

To him let little children come, 
For he hath said they may ; 

His bosom then shall be their home, 
Their tears he'll wipe away. 

For all who early seek his face 
Shall surely taste his love ; 

Jesus shall guide them by his grace 
To dwell with him above. 

9. PRAYER FOR A LITTLE CHILD. 

Lord Jesus, teach a child to pray, 
Who humbly kneels to thee ; 

And every night and every day 
My Friend and Saviour be. 

While here I live, give me thy grace ; 

And when I'm called to die, 
! take my soul to see thy face, 

And sing thy praise on high. 

D. A. 

10. PRAYER FOR SINCERITY. 

My heavenly Father ! when to thee 
I lift my hands and pray, 

May I not only bow the knee, 
But feel the words I say. 

My every sin, O Lord, forgive, 

My every want supply ; 
For Jesus died that I might live, 

And pleads for me on high. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART L 

send thy Holy Spirit down, 

To dwell within my heart ; 
There may he make thy glory known, 

And never, Lord, depart. 

D. A. T. 

11. PRAYER FOR A CHILD. 

"Teach me to do thy will; for thou art my God." 
Ps. cxliii. 10. 

Lord ! wilt thou teach me to pray, 
And afterwards answer my prayer ? 

1 know thou canst hear what I say, 

Because thou art everywhere. 

Not even a sparrow can fall, 

But, Lord, it is noticed by thee ; 

And though I'm so young and so small. 
Thou art not unmindful of me. 

O teach me to do what is right, 
And when I offend thee, forgive ; 

And make it my greatest delight 
To serve thee as long as I live. 

Whatever distress I am in, 

To thee I may cheerfully call ; 
Especially keep me from sin, 

For that's the worst evil of all.* 

19. " GODLINESS WITH CONTENTMENT 
IS GREAT GAIN." 

Poor and needy though I be, 
God Almighty cares for me ; 
Gives me clothing, shelter, food, 
Gives me all I have of good. 

He will hear me when I pray, 
He is with me night and day ; 
When I sleep and when I wake, 
For the Lord my Saviour's sake. 
* From " Original Hymns for Sunday-Schools." 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

He who reigns above the sky, 
Once became as poor as I ; 
He whose blood for me was shed, 
Had not where to lay his head. 

Though I labour here a while, 
He will bless me with his smile ; 
And when this short life is past, 
I shall rest with him at last. 

Then to Him I tune my song, 
Happy as the day is long ; 
This my joy for ever be, 
God Almighty cares for me. 

D. A. T. 

13. GOD CARES FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. 

When I look up to yonder sky, 

So pure, so bright, so wondrous high, 

I think of One I cannot see, 

But One who sees and cares for me. 

'Tis he my daily food provides, 
And all that I can want besides ; 
And when I close my sleeping eye, 
I rest in peace, for he is nigh. 

Then shall I not for ever love 
This gracious God who reigns above ? 
For very good indeed is he 
To love a little child like me ! 

14. PRAYER FOR THE HOLY SPIRIT. 

Come, Holy Spirit, come ; 
O hear an infant's prayer ! 
Stoop down and make my heart thy home, 
And shed thy blessing there. 

Thy light, thy love impart, 
And let it ever be 
A holy, humble, happy heart, 
A dwelling-place for thee. 

7 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 

Let thy rich grace increase, 
Through all my early days, 
The fruits of righteousness and peace 
To thine eternal praise. 

D. A. T. 

15. GOOD DESIRES 

" Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye 
should follow his steps." — 1 Pet. ii. 21. 

I wish to be like Jesus, 

A meek, obedient child ; 
He kept his parents' word, and was 

So holy and so mild. 

I wish to be like Jesus, 

So frequently in prayer : 
Alone upon the mountain -top, 

He sought his Father there. 

I wish to be like Jesus ; 

For never do I find, 
That He, though persecuted, was 

To any one unkind. 

But, oh ! I'm not like Jesus, — 

I am a sinful child ; 
My heart is full of wickedness, 

I am not meek or mild. 

Ah, no, I'm not like Jesus, 

From evil tempers free : 
Oh, gentle Saviour, send thy grace. 

And make me more like Thee. 



GOD LOVES THOSE WHO SEEK HIM. 



16. 

" I love them that love me ; and those that seek me early 
shall find me." — Prov. viii. 17. 

God loves the little child that prays. 

And humbly seeks his face ; 
And walks in all his holy ways, 

And looks to him for grace. 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

God loves the child whose early youth 

Is given to the Lord ; 
Who learns, and keeps, and speaks the truth. 

And loves his holy word. 

God loves all those who prize his love, 

And till this life be past, 
Will shine upon them from above, 

And save them to the last. 

O Heavenly Father, shine on me, 

And all my heart unite 
To love, and serve, and honour thee, 

And make thee my delight. 

D. A. T. 

17. MORNING HYMN. 

" I laid me down and slept; I awaked, for the Lord 
sustained me." — Ps. iii. 5. 

When morning comes, the birds arise, 
And raise their voices to the skies ; 
With warbling notes and cheerful lays 
They sing their great Creator's praise. 

Shall I from rest to labour go, 
Or any work presume to do, 
Before I've sought the God of heaven. 
And first to him my tribute given ? 

Come, then, my soul, awake and pray, 
And praise thy Maker day by day ; 
Bless him for raiment, health, and food, 
And for each peaceful night's abode. 

Let every bird's sweet morning song 
Remind me as I walk along, 
Of Him whose love and guardian power 
Uphold and keep me every hour. 

9 



18. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 



AN EVENING HYMN. 



" I will both lay me down in peace and sleep : for thou, 
Lord, only makest me dwell in safety." — Ps. iv. 8. 

Lord, I have passed another day, 
And come to thank thee for thy care : 
Forgive my faults in work or play, 
And listen to my evening prayer. 

Thy favour gives me daily bread, 
And friends, who all my wants supply ; 
And safely now I rest my head, 
Preserved and guarded by thine eye. 

Look down in pity and forgive 
Whate'er I've said or done amiss ; 
And help me, every day I live, 
To serve thee better than on this. 

Now, while I speak, be pleased to take 
A helpless child beneath thy care ; 
And condescend, for Jesus' sake, 
To listen to my evening prayer.* 

Xo« THE same. 

Jesus, tender shepherd, hear me, 
Bless thy little lamb to-night ; 

Through the darkness be thou near me, 
Keep me safe till morning light. 

Through this day thy hand has led me, 
And I thank thee for thy care ; 

Thou hast warmed me, clothed and fed me, 
Listen to my evening prayer. 

Let my sins be all forgiven, 

Bless the friends I love so well ; 

Take me, when I die, to heaven, 
Happy, there with thee to dwell. 

Mary Lundie Duncan. 

* " Hymns for Infant Minds." Ann Taylor. 
10. 



PART T.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 



19. 



19. 



20. 



THE LORD'S DAY MORNING. 

This is the day when Christ arose 

So early from the dead ; 
Why should I keep mine eyelids closed, 

And waste my hours in bed ? 

To-day with pleasure Christians meet 

To pray and hear thy word, 
And I would go with cheerful feet 

To learn thy will, Lord ! 

Incline me now to read and pray, 

Prepare my soul for heaven : 
O may I love this blessed day, 

The best of all the seven. 

THE SAME. 

This is God's most holy day ; 
We must neither work nor play ; 
But we'll try to pray and sing, 
And to serve our heavenly King. 

O, 'tis pleasant now to go 
To our Saviour's house below ; 
And we hope to sing and love 
In our Saviour's house above. 

Mrs. Parson. 

FOR GRACE TO RESEMBLE THE 
LORD JESUS. 

Lord ! hear a little infant pray 
The little simple prayer I say ; 

Saviour, listen from thy throne, 
And deign to call a child thine own. 

1 would be thine, and like to Thee, 
And serve Thee in simplicity : 
Renew my heart, my sins forgive, 
And teach me, Saviour, how to live. 

11 



21. 



12 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART 

I would be like Thee : give me grace 
That as in water, face to face, 
So thine own image I may show, 
And daily in thy likeness grow. 

When other little ones I see, 
Loving and gentle may I be ; 
Affection to my parents show, 
And learn how much to them I owe. 

Oh, never, Saviour, never let 
My heart thy wondrous love forget : 
Thou who wast mock'd and crucified ! 
Thou who for love of me hast died ! 



PRAISE FOR CREATION AND 
PROVIDENCE. 

I sing th' almighty power of God, 
That made the mountains rise ; 

That spread the flowing seas abroad, 
And built the lofty skies. 

I sing the wisdom that ordained 

The sun to rule the day ; 
The moon shines full at his command, 

And all the stars obey. 

I sing the goodness of the Lord, 
That filled the earth with food ; 

He formed the creatures with his word. 
And then pronounced them good. 

Lord, how thy wonders are displayed, 
Where'er I turn mine eyes ; 

If I survey the ground I tread, 
Or gaze upon the skies. 

There's not a plant or flower below, 
But makes thy glory known ; 

And clouds arise, and tempests blow, 
By order from thy throne. 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

Creatures, as numerous as they be, 

Are subject to thy care ; 
There's not a place where we can flee, 

But God is present there. 

In heaven he shines with beams of love, 

He sees the hell beneath ; 
'Tis on his earth I stand or move, 

And 'tis his air I breathe. 

His hand is my perpetual guard, 
He keeps me with his eye ; 

Why should I then forget the Lord, 
Who is for ever nigh ? 



22. G0D MADE ALL THAT IS. 

Our God is good, and he is great, 
Around his throne the angels wait ; 
He made the sun with beams so bright, 
He made the moon which shines by night, 
The glittering skies that look so fair, 
With every star that sparkles there. 

The mountains and the rocks he made, 
And all the hills in order laid ; 
He poured the water in the seas ; 
He made the grass, the herbs, the trees, 
The valleys, and the fields so fair, 
And every flower that blossoms there. 

The lion and the tiger bold, 

The sheep and cattle of the fold, 

The little birds that sweetly sing, 

The insect with its beauteous wing, 

The fishes, — all we see that's fair 

Or good, — He made and placed them there. 

D. A. 

13 



23. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 



GOD OUR CREATOR. 



GrOD made me too with curious art, 

A thinking head, a feeling heart, 

A soul to understand His will, 

And set before it good and ill ; 

He sees if it be dark or fair, 

And knows each thought that enters there. 

Then let me try and seek his face, 
Implore his mercy and his grace ; 
Ask for the blessings of his love, 
And pray to dwell with him above. 
For in that world where all is fair, 
He is the light and glory there. 

And when this life's short scene is o'er, 
When sun and moon shall be no more, 
May I with saints and angels stand, 
Arrayed in white at his right hand, 
And worship in that world so fair, 
The Lord who reigns for ever there. 

B. A. T. 



24. G0D EVERY WHERE PRESENT. 

It was my heavenly Father's love, 

Brought every being forth, 
He made the shining worlds above, 

And every thing on earth. 

Each lovely flower, the smallest fly, 

The seas, the waterfall, 
The bright green leaves, the clear blue sky, 

'Tis God that made them all. 

He gave me all my friends, and taught 

My heart to love them well, 
And he bestowed the powers of thought, 

And speech my thoughts to tell. 
14 



L'ART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

My father and my mother dear, 

He is their Father too : 
He bids me all their precepts hear, 

And all they teach me do. 

God sees and hears me all the day, 

And 'mid the darkest night ; 
He views me when I disobey, 

And when I act aright. 

He guards me with a parent's care 

When I am all alone : 
My hymns of praise, my humble prayer. 

He hears them every one. 

God hears what I am saying now, 

what a wondrous thought ! 
My heavenly Father, teach me how 

To love thee as I ought. 

25. ABOUT GOD, WHO MADE THE SUN 
AND MOON. 

Child. 

1 saw the glorious sun arise 
From yonder mountain grey ; 

And as he travelled through the skies, 

The darkness went away, 
And all around me was so bright, 
I wished it would be always light. 

But when his shining course was done, 
The gentle moon drew nigh, 

And stars came twinkling one by one, 
Upon the shady sky : — 

Who made the sun to shine so far, 

The moon, and every twinkling star ? 

Mother. 
'Twas God, my child, who mado them alL 

By his almighty skill : 
He keeps them that they do not fall, 

15 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART T. 

And guides them as he will ; — 
That glorious God, who lives afar 
In heaven beyond the highest star. 

Child. 
How very great that God must be, 

Who rolls them through the air ! 
Too high, I fear, to notice me, 

Or listen to my prayer ! 
Oh ! mother, will he condescend 
To be a little infant's friend ? 

Mother. 
He will, my love ; for though he made 

Those wonders in the sky, 
You never need to be afraid 

He should neglect your cry ; 
For, humble as a child may be, 
A child that prays he loves to see. 

Behold the daisy where you tread, 

That little lowly thing ; 
Behold the insects over-head, 

That play about in spring : 
Though we may think them mean and small, 

Yet God takes notice of them all. 

And will not Jesus deign to make 

A feeble child his care ? 
Ah ! yes, he died for children's sake, 

And loves the infant's prayer. 
God made the stars and daisies too, 
And watches over "them and you.* 

26. MAN FORMED TO PRAISE GOD. 

Sun, moon and stars, by day and night, 
At God's commandment give us light ; 
And when we wake, and while we sleep, 
Their watch, like guardian angels, keep. 

* " Hymns for Infant Minds." Ann Taylor. 
16 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

The bright blue sky above our head, 
The soft green earth on which we tread, 
The ocean rolling round the land, 
Were made by God's Almighty hand. 

Sweet flowers that hill and dale adorn, 
Fair fruit-trees, fields of grass and corn, 
The clouds that rise, the showers that fall, 
The winds that blow — God sends them all. 

The beasts that graze with downward eye, 
The birds that perch, and sing, and fly, 
The fishes swimming in the sea, 
God's creatures are as well as we. 

But us he formed for better things ; — 
As servants of the King of kings 
With lifted hands and open face, 
And thankful heart to seek his grace. 

Thus God loved man, and more than thus, 
He sent his Son to die for us, 
And now invites us when we die, 
To come and live with him on high. 

But we must live to Him below, 
For none but such to heaven will go ; 
Lord Jesus, hear our humble prayer, 
And lead the little children there. 

Montgomery. 



27 



HYMN OF PRAISE FOR A LITTLE 
CHILD. 

God made the world in which we live, 

The sea and all the land ; 
And every thing that lives and moves, 

Is nourished by his hand. 

God made the flowers that bud and bloom 

About my little feet ; 
He made them look so very gay, 

And smell so very sweet. ^ 

c 15 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART 

God made the lambs that skip and run 

In yonder mead all day ; 
Good little lambs, they are so kind, 

They never fight — but play. 

God gives me life, and food, and clothes. 

And friends, and all I need ; 
I cannot tell how good he is, 

He's very kind indeed. 

God bends an ear to all I pray, 

He hears an infant's praise : 
Oh ! may he teach my heart to love 

And thank him all my days. 



28. 



THE AIR. 



How cool, how sweet, the breeze of morn I 
It moves the trees, it waves the corn ; 

It makes the buds to bloom : 
But for the air all plants would die ; 
No beast could move, no bird could fly ; 

Nor could we breathe or live. 
Then with one breath our praise should flow 
To Him who makes the winds to blow. 
Praise ye the Lord ! 



29. 



THE GIFT OF HEARING AND SPEECH. 



Hearing. 

For ears to hear my God I'll praise ; 
How sad would be my life's dull days, 
If, dead to all that charms the ear, 
I no sweet sound or voice could hear ! 
The bird's soft note, so sweet and gay, 
How pleasantly it cheers my way ! 
But sweeter still the voice that brings 
Good news to man, of heavenly things ; 
18 * 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

That tells how streams of mercy flow, 
To free my soul from sin and woe, 
How I a child of grace may be 
Through Jesus Christ, who died for me. 
Since such blest sounds have reached my ears. 
To raise my joy and soothe my fears, 
O never more will I attend 
To words which may my God offend ; 
But pray for grace, when sin is near, 
To close my heart, and shut my ear. 
Yet may I quick and ready be 
To hear what's good and best for me ; 
The precious word of truth and grace, 
And the sweet hymns of joy and praise ; 
That word which came from heaven above, 
Those hymns which sing his wondrous love, 
Who is so good to me ! 

Speech. 

God gave my tongue to speak his praise, 
And the sweet sounds of joy to raise 

For all his gifts so free ! 
Then to speak good to all I know, 
And the Lord's love and praise to show 

Whilst he grants life to me. 

Lord, let the lip of truth be mine ; 
'Tis what thou lov'st, the gift is thine. 

Put each false speech away ; 
One single word that harm may do, 
That is not meek, and kind, and true, 

Grant I may never say. 

Oh ! may it be my grief and pain, 
To hear men take thy name in vain ; 

Lord, turn them from their sin ! 
Guard me and my companions dear, 
And may we in thy love and fear 

A life of praise begin. 

c2 19 



30. 



31. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 

THE USE WE SHOULD MAKE OF 
THE BIBLE. 

Much will I prize God's holy book, 
And day by day in it will look ; 
And pray for grace that it may be 
The word of life and light to me : 
That it may rule my heart and ways, 
And be my guide through all my days, 
And teach my soul sweet songs of praise 
To the great Lord who gave it. 

TRUE WISDOM. 
" Wisdom is the principal thing." — Prov. iv. 7. 

What are we in the scriptures told 

Is sweeter far than honey ? 
Better than silver or than gold, 

Than houses, lands, or money ? 

Why, wisdom far surpasses wealth, 

And all the precious stones ; 
For to the soul she's life and health, 

And marrow to the bones. 

True wisdom shows the peaceful road, 

The sweet, the pleasant path, 
Which leads to life, and joy, and God, 

And saves from guilt and wrath. 

True wisdom is to fear the Lord, 
And trust his pardoning grace ; 

To do his will, and love his word, 
And long to see his face. 

The blessed Saviour from his birth 

Walked in this heavenly way : 
And all the time he dwelt on earth, 
He never went astray, 
20 ' 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

The way of life he plainly showed, 
And marked it with his blood, 

That all his Saints might find the road 
To glory and to God.* 

32. "OUR FATHER WHO ART IN 
HEAVEN." 

Great God, and wilt thou condescend 
To be my Father and my Friend ? 
I a poor child, and thou so high, 
The Lord of earth, and air, and sky. 

Art thou my Father ? Canst thou bear 
To hear my poor imperfect prayer ? 
Or wilt thou listen to the praise 
That such a little one can raise ? 

Art thou my Father ? Let me be 

A meek, obedient child to thee ; 

And try in word, and deed, and thought, 

To serve and please thee as I ought. 

Art thou my Father ? Ill depend 
Upon the care of such a friend ; 
And only wish to do and be 
Whatever seemeth good to thee. 

Art thou my Father ? Then at last, 
When all my days on earth are past, 
Send down and take me in thy love, 
To be thy better child above, f 

33 ABOUT JESUS CrfRIST, WHO DIED 
FOR SINNERS. 

Jesus, who lived above the sky, 
Came down to be a man and die ; 
And in the Bible we may see 
How very good he used to be. 

* " Hymns for Young Minds." Anne Houlditch. 
f " Hymns for Infant Minds." 

21 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART 

He went about, he was so kind, 
To cure poor people who were blind ; 
And many who were sick and lame, 
He pitied them and did the same. 

And more than that, he told them too 
The things that God would have them do ; 
And was so gentle and so mild, 
He would have listened to a child. 

But such a cruel death he died ! 

He was hung up and crucified ! 

And those kind hands that did such good. 

They nail'd them to a cross of wood ! 

And so he died ! — and this is why 
He came to be a man and die : 
The Bible says he came from heaven 
That we might have our sins forgiven. 

He knew how wicked men had been, 
And knew that God must punish sin ; 
So, out of pity, Jesus said, 
He'd bear the punishment instead. 

Now God will pardon those who pray, 
And strive from sin to turn away ; 
may we early seek his face, 
And share the riches of his grace ! * 

34 THE BIBLE TELLS US OF THE LORD 
JESUS CHRIST. 
" Search the Scriptures."— John v. 39. 
Come, let us search God's holy word, 

And see what we can find 
About that loving, gracious Lord, 
The Saviour of Mankind. 

See there how humble was his birth, 

No bed but straw or hay ; 
Though he was Lord of all the earth, 

He in a manger lay. 
• " Original Hymns for Sunday Schools." 
22 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

So lowly was he at the first ; 

And as he older grew, 
Cold, hunger, weariness, and thirst, 

The Lord of glory knew. 

But poor and needy as he seemed, 

His mighty actions showed, 
Though little by the world esteemed. 

He was the son of God. 

He healed the Sick, and raised the dead, 
The deaf and blind he cured ; 

At his command the devils fled, 
The sea obey'd his word. 

And when he was by sinners' hands 

Scourged, crucified, and slain, 
He brake asunder aU their bands, 
And rose to life again. 

Who would not love a Lord so kind, 

Or fear a God so great ? 
Whoever waits on him will find 

Tis not in vain to wait.* 

35. JESUS ONCE A CHILD. 

And was my Saviour once a child. 

A little child like me ? 
And was he humble, meek, and mild, 

As little ones should be ? 

O why did not the Son of God 

Come as an angel bright ? 
And why not leave his fair abode, 

To come with power and might. 

Because he came not then to reign, 

As sovereign here below ; 
He came to save our souls from sin, 

Whence all our sorrows flow. 

* •■ Hymns for Young Minds." Anne Houlditch. 

23 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART 

And did the Son of God most high, 

Consent a man to be ? 
And did that blessed Saviour die 

Upon the cross for me ? 

And did my Saviour freely give 

His life for sinful men ? 
What ! did he die that we might live ? 

Oh, how he loved us then ! 

33. PRAISE TO CHRIST. 

Let us sing with one accord 
Praise to Jesus Christ our Lord ; 
He is worthy whom we praise, 
Hearts and voices let us raise. 

He hath made us by his power, 
He hath kept us to this hour, 
He redeems us from the grave, 
He who died, now lives to save. 

What he bids us, let us do, 
Where he leads us, let us go ; 
As he loves us, let us love 
All below, and all above. 

Angels praise him, so will we, 
Sinful children though we be ; 
Poor and weak, we'll sing the more, 
Jesus loves the weak and poor. 

Dear to him is childhood's prayer, 
Children's hearts to him are dear ; 
Heart and voice, let all be given : 
All will find the way to heaven. 

37. THE CHILD'S GOOD WISH. 

I think, when I read that sweet story of old, 
When Jesus dwelt here among men, 
And called little children as lambs to his fold, 
I should like to have been with them then. 
24 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

I wish that his hands had been put on my head, 
And that I had been placed on his knee, 
And that I might have seen his kind look when he said, 
;; Let the little ones come unto me." 

Yet still to my Saviour, in prayer I may go, 
And ask for a share in his love ; 
And if I thus earnestly seek him below, 
I shall see him, and hear him above — 

In that beautiful place he is gone to prepare 
For all who are washed and forgiven ; 
And many dear children are gathering there ; 
" For of such is the kingdom of heaven." 

Miss Thompson. 

38. THE ADVANTAGES OF EARLY 
RELIGION. 

Happy the child, whose youngest years 

Receive instructions well ; 
"Who hates the sinner's path, and fears 

The road that leads to hell. 

When we devote our youth to God, 

'Tis pleasing in his eyes ; 
A flower, when offered in the bud, 

Is no vain sacrifice. 

'Twill save us from a thousand snares 

To mind religion young : 
Grace will preserve our following years, 

And make our virtue strong. 

To thee, Almighty God, to thee 

Our childhood we resign ; 
'Twill please us to look back, and see 

That our whole lives were thine. 

Let the sweet work of prayer and praise 
Employ my youngest breath ; 

Thus I'm prepared for longer days, 
Or fit for early death. 

25 



39. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 



SEEKING THE SAVIOUR'S GUIDANCE. 



Saviour, like a shepherd lead us, 
Much we need thy tender care ; 

In thy pleasant pastures feed us, 
For our use thy folds prepare : 

Blessed Jesus, 
Thou hast bought us — thine we are. 

We are thine, do thou befriend us, 
Be the guardian of our way ; 

Keep thy flock, from sin defend us, 
Seek us when we go astray : 

Blessed Jesus, 
Hear young children when they pray. 

Thou hast promised to receive us, 
Poor and sinful though we be ; 

Thou hast mercy to relieve us, 

Grace to cleanse, and power to free : 

Blessed Jesus, 
Let us early turn to thee. 

Early let us seek thy favour, 

Early let us do thy will ; 
Blessed Lord, and only Saviour, 

With thyself our bosoms fill : 
Blessed Jesus, 

Thou hast loved us — love us still. 



40. 



FOR A BLESSING ON BENEFACTORS. 



Fatiier of mercy, hear our prayers 
For those who do us good ; 

Whose love for us a school prepares, 
Storing our minds with food. 

And while their bounty is our theme, 
Thy praise, O Lord, we'll sing ; 

They are the kind refreshing stream ; 
But thou the unfailing spring. 
26 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

Their kind compassion claims our love, 
Oh make their souls thy care ; 

Raise them to heavenly bliss above, 
And may we meet them there ! 

41. THE EYE OF GOD EVERYWHERE. 

G-od reigns in glory, and on high 
Sits on his throne of majesty ; 
Yet from that glorious throne he bends, 
And even to a child attends. 

Asleep, awake ; by night, by day ; 
Where'er I go, whate'er I say ; 
Although the Lord I cannot see, 
His eye is always fixed on me. 

He hears me when I pray or praise, 
He also ponders all my ways ; 
May I so live as God approves, 
May I be one whom Jesus loves. 

God never will forsake his own, 
He will not leave me all alone ; 
When not another friend is near, 
May I remember God is here. 

Oh ! may I try to praise him still, 
To know, and love, and do his will ; 
Then will my joy and gladness be, 
That God's own eye is fixed on me. 

D. A. T. 

42. TH E CHILD'S WARNING AGAINST SIN. 

A watchful eye looks from above ; 

G-od marks and grieves to see, 
When lightly you esteem his love, 

Nor care his child to be. 

You think, perhaps, 'twill make you glad, 

To have your foolish way ; 
And little know how very sad 

It is to disobey. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 

But would you taste unfailing joy, 

And from each sorrow cease, 
God's love will all your wants supply — 

His ways alone are peace. 

43. THE LITTLE CHRISTIAN'S RESOLVE. 

" Thou shalt call his name Jesus ; for he shall save his 
people from their sins." — Matt. i. 21. 

I have an evil heart within, 
A heart that's often prone to sin ; 
What can a feeble infant do, 
His naughty tempers to subdue ? 

This will I do, when first I find 
An evil thought within my mind ; 
I'll go to Jesus, and I'll say, 
Lord, take this sinful thought away. 

Does not the name of Jesus mean 
One that has power to save from sin ? 
O Lamb of God, take mine away, 
And give me a new heart, I pray. 

44. AGAINST LYING. 
'tis a lovely thing for youth 

To walk betimes in wisdom's way ; 
To fear a lie, to speak the truth, 
That we may trust to all they say. 

But liars we can never trust, 

Though they should speak the thing that's true ; 

And he that does one fault at first, 

And lies to hide it, makes it two. 

45 PRAYER FOR A CHILD THAT HAS 

TOLD A FALSEHOOD. 
" Set a watch, O Lord, upon ray mouth : keep the door of 
my lips." — Ps. cxli. 3. 

O Lord, my sinful heart renew, 

Thy Holy Spirit send, 
Forgive what I have said untrue, 

And help me to amend. 
28 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

Upon my mouth, oh ! set a watch, 

That I may sin no more, 
Preserve my lips from falsehood's touch. 

Oh ! do thou keep the door. 

I know, Lord, thou lovest truth ; 

Help me to love it too, 
And through my childhood and my youth. 

The strictest truth pursue. 

C. M. 

46. THE VOICE OF CONSCIENCE. 

" Unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much 
required." — Luke xii. 48. 

Oh, if some little heathen child 
On whom the Gospel just had smiled, 
Who just had learned to know the Lord, 
And read and love his holy word, — 

If such a child came o'er the sea, 
Our happy English homes to see, 
And listen while we join to sing, 
Or bow before our heavenly King ; — 

Would not that child expect to find 
That we were holy, gentle, kind — 
And at the Saviour's sweet command, 
Were journeying to a better land ? 

And is it so ? Let conscience tell — 
She the dark story knoweth well ; 
No secret sins from her may hide, 
No angry words, or thoughts of pride ! 

Lord ! we have sinned — though Gospel light 
Hath shone around us, fair and bright ; 
Oh ! help us to repent to-day, 
Nor grieve thy Spirit quite away. 

29 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART 

We would not cease our earnest prayer, 
That heathen lands thy love may share ; 
May they and we — alike forgiven — 
Be thine on earth, and thine in heaven ! 

E. M. I. 



47. 



LOVE BETWEEN BROTHERS AND 
SISTERS. 



Though quarrels may disturb the street, 
There should be peace at home ; 

Where sisters dwell, and brothers meet, 
Disputes should never come. 

Birds in their little nests agree, 

And 'tis a shameful sight, 
When children of one family 

Fall out, and chide, and fight. 

Pardon, O Lord, our childish rage, 

Our selfishness remove ; 
That, as we grow to riper age, 

Our hearts may all be love. 



48. 



30 



BROTHERLY LOVE. 

The God of heaven is pleased to see 
That little children all agree ; 
And will not slight the praise they bring 
When loving children join to sing. 

For love and kindness please him more 
Than if we gave him all our store ; 
And children here who dwell in love, 
Are like his happy ones above. 

The gentle child who tries to please, 
Who hates to quarrel, fret and tease, 
Who fears to say an angry word — 
That child is pleasing to the Lord. 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

O God ! forgive whenever we 
Forget thy will and disagree ; 
And grant that each of us may find 
The sweet delight of being kind.* 



49. 



FAMILY UNION. 



" Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them 
that weep." — Rom. xii. 15. 

Jesus, Lord, we look to thee ; 
May we in thy name agree ; 
Let us for each other care, 
Joy or grief together share. 

Make us one in heart and mind, 
Courteous, pityful and kind, 
Lowly, meek, in thought, and word, 
That we may be like our Lord. 

50, THE HAPPY HOME. 

Happy the home, when God is there, 

And love fills every breast ; 
Where one their wish, and one their prayer, 

And one their heavenly rest. 

Happy the home, where Jesus' name 

Is sweet to every ear ; 
Where children early lisp his fame, 

And parents hold him dear. 

Happy the home, where prayer is heard, 

And praise is wont to rise ; 
Where parents love the sacred word, 

And live but for the skies. 

Lord ! let us in our homes agree, 

This blessed peace to gain ; 
Unite our hearts in love to Thee, 

And love to all will reign. 



" Hymns for Infant Minds." 



MRS. W. 
31 



HYMNS FOE INFANTS. [PART 

51. THE LAW OF CHRIST. 

Oh ! that the Saviour's heavenly law 

My constant rule might be, 
"To do to others as I would 

" That they should do to me." 

No vexing speech, nor act unkind 
Would then from me proceed, 

But love and gentleness direct 
My every word and deed. 

I should not seek to raise myself, 

And others to abase, 
But rather this my happy choice, 

To take the lowest place. 

And how shall I, a sinful child, 
To pride and wrath inclined, 

Subdue my nature, and attain 
This lovely, gracious mind ? 

Oh ! blessed Jesus, unto thee 

Alone for grace I seek, 
Who wast on earth the lowly One, 

The gentle and the meek. 

Be Thou my teacher and my guide ; 

So shall my practice be, 
To do to others as I would 

That they should do to me.* 



52. 



TIME AND ETERNITY. 



How long sometimes a day appears ! 

And weeks, how long are they ! 
Months move along as if the years 

Would never pass away. 

* " Hymns for Young Minds." By Anne Houlditch. 
32 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

But months and years are passing by, 

And soon must all be gone : 
For day by day, as minutes fly, 

Eternity comes on. 

Days, months, and years, must have an end, 

Eternity has none ; 
'Twill always have as long to spend 

As when it first begun. 

Great God ! an infant cannot tell 

How such a thing can be ; 
I only pray that I may dwell 

That long, long time with thee.* 



53. 



DIFFERENCE OF COLOR. 
" He is Lord of all." 
God gave to Afric's sons 

A brow of sable dye, 
And spread the country of their birth 

Beneath a burning sky : 
And with a cheek of olive, made 

The little Hindoo child, 
And darkly stained the forest tribes 

That roam the western wild. 

To me He gave a form 

Of fairer, whiter clay ; 
But am I, therefore, in His sight 

Respected more than they ? 
No, — 'tis the hue of deeds and thoughts 

He traces in His Book ; 
'Tis the complexion of the heart 

On which He deigns to look. 

Not by the tinted cheek 

That fades away so fast, 
But by the color of the soul 

We shall be judged at last ; 

* " Hymns for Infant Minds." 
D 



33 



HTiatfi FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 

And God, the Judge, will look at me 

With anger in His eyes, 
If I my brother's darker brow 

Should ever dare despise.* 

54i AN ENGLISH CHILD'S HYMN OF PRAISE. 

I thank the goodness and the grace 
Which on my birth have smiled, 

And made me, in these Christian days, 
A happy English child. 

I was not born, as thousands are, 
Where God was never known ; 

And taught to pray a useless prayer 
To blocks of wood and stone. 

I was not born a little slave, 

To labour in the sun, 
And wish I were but in the grave, 

And all my labour done. 

I was not born without a home, 

Or in some broken shed ; 
A gipsy baby, taught to roam, 

And steal my daily bread. 

My God, I thank thee, who hast planned 

A better lot for me, 
And placed me in this happy land, 

Where I may hear of thee.f 

55. GRATITUDE FOR THE BIBLE. 

" The seed is the Word of God." — Luke viii. 1 1 . 

Oh ! are we not thankful for Bibles to read, — 
The seed of the kingdom, unperishing seed ? 
And shall we not Beek that good seed to send forth 
To the East, and the West, and the South, and the 
North ? 

* From " The Child's Wreath of Hymns and Songs." 
f " Hymns for Infant Minds." 
34 



PART I.] IIYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

Oh yes ! where the cold snow of Greenland 

descends, — 
Where the slave 'neath a western sun wearily 

bends, — 
Where China's vast wall rises dark to the view, 
Or the Southern Isles gleam 'mid the waters so 

blue ; — 

Wherever a dear little baby hath smiled, 

Or the heart of a mother hath yearned o'er her 

child ; 
Wherever mankind have a home or a name, 
The Saviour of sinners we long to proclaim ! 

We would send forth the seed, and ask God to 

impart 
His blessing to make it spring up in the heart ; 
But, oh ! we would seek, while we scatter it round, 
That in our own garden some fruit may be found. 

Dear Saviour ! thy smile is like sunshine, which 

brings 
Life, gladness, and light to earth's beautiful 

things ; — 
Oh ! let it to every heart's garden be given, 
And fit us to dwell with our Father in Heaven. 

e. m. r. 



56. 



PRAYER FOR GRACE TO UNDERSTAND 
THE SCRIPTURES. 

merciful and gracious Lord ! 
Teach me to understand thy word ; 
Teach me, in childhood's early hour, 
To love thy name, to fear thy power. 

To know that my Redeemer gave 
His precious blood, my soul to save ; 
O may I ever grateful prove, 
For that amazing act of love. 

d 2 35 



58. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 

57. FOR A VERY LITTLE CHILD IN 
SICKNESS. 

Almighty God, I'm very ill, 
But cure me, if it be thy will ; 
For thou canst take away my pain, 
And make me strong and well again. 

Let me be patient every day, 
And mind what those who nurse me say ; 
And grant that all I have to take 
May do me good, for Jesus' sake.* 

FOR A CHILD IN SICKNESS. 

My Father ! I am very ill, 

Thou knowest all I feel ; 
And if it be thy blessed will, 

Thou canst my sickness heal. 

In trouble, if I call on Thee, 

Thy holy word declares, 
Thou wilt look down and pity me, 

And listen to my prayers. 

Since Jesus pleads for me on high, 

Oh take away my pain ; 
Be very gracious to my cry, 

And make me well again. d. a. t. 

THANKSGIVING FOR RECOVERY. 

I prayed to God, He heard my prayer, 
And made a little child his care ; 
When I was sick, he healed my pain, 
And gave me health and strength again. 
O let me now his grace implore, 
And love and praise him evermore. 

D. A. T. 

• " Hymns for Infant Minds." 

36 



59. 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

60. FOR A CHRISTIAN CHILD IN SICKNESS 
WHEN THERE IS NO PROSPECT OF RECOVERY. 

Why do you weep ? 

I am falling asleep, 
And Jesus, my Shepherd, 

Is watching his sheep : 
His arm is beneath me, 

His eye is above ; 
His spirit, within me, 

Says, "Rest in my love : 
With blood I have bought thee. 

And wash'd thee from sin ; 
With care I have brought thee, 

My fold to be in ; 
Refresh'd by still waters, 

In green pastures fed, 
Thy day has gone by — 

I am making thy bed." 
Extract, in " The Twin Brothers." 



61. 



THE CHILD SEPARATED FROM ITS 
PARENTS. 

Papa, mamma, are gone away, 

Far, far beyond the sea, 
Though very much they wished to stay. 

And live at home with me. 

I feel sometimes a lonely child, 

Now that they are not here : 
My kind mamma, who sweetly smiled, 

And wiped off every tear. 
Papa, who took me on his knee, 

His arm around me press'd ; 
Oh ! when will they come back to me, 

And clasp me to their breast ? 

IVe books, I've friends, a happy home, 
And much to make me glad ; 

But still, when thoughts of India come, 
My heart is very sad. 

37 



62. 



38 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART 

It is not that I would complain, 

'Tis wrong to fret and cry, 
And God can bring them back again, 

And God is always nigh. 

Then, while my father's far away, 

Beyond the broad blue sea, 
O Lord ! in Jesus' name I pray, 

A Father be to me ! 

Look on me as thy little one, 

Teach me to feel thy love ; 
And take me, when this life is done, 

To live with thee above. 

M. A. STODART. 

A CHILD'S LAMENTATION FOR THE 
DEATH OF A DEAR MOTHER. 

A poor afflicted child, I kneel 
Before my heavenly Father's seat, 

To tell Him all the grief I feel, 

And spread my sorrows at His feet. 

Yet I must weep ; I cannot stay 

These tears, that trickle while I bend, 

Since Thou art pleased to take away 
So dear, so very dear a friend. 

And now I recollect with pain 

The many times I grieved her sore ; 

Oh ! if she would but come again, 
I think I'd vex her so no more. 

How I would watch her gentle eye ! 

'Twould be my play to do her will ! 
And she should never have to sigh 

Again, for my behaving ill ! 

But since she's gone so far away, 
And cannot profit by my pains, 

Let me this child-like duty pay 
To that dear parent that remains. 



FART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

Let me console his broken heart, 
And be his comfort by my care ; 

That when at last we come to part, 
I may not have such grief to bear.* 



63. 



THE HAPPINESS OF HEAVEN. 

Here we suffer grief and pain ; 
Here we meet to part again ; 
In Heaven we part no more. 
Oh ! that will be joyful ! 
Joyful, joyful, joyful ! 
Oh! that will be joyful ! 
When we meet to part no more ! 

All who love the Lord below, 
When they die to heaven will go, 
And sing with saints above. 
Oh ! that will be joyful ! &c. 

Little children will be there, 
Who have sought the Lord by prayer, 
From many an infant school. 
Oh! that will be joyful ! &c. 

Teachers, too, will meet above, 
And our parents whom we love, 
Shall meet to part on more. 
Oh ! that will be joyful ! &c. 

Oh ! how happy we shall be ! 
For our Saviour we shall see, 
Exalted on his throne ! 

Oh ! that will be joyful ! &c. 

There we all shall sing with joy. 
And eternity employ 

In praising Christ the Lord. 
Oh! that will be joyful ! &c. 

• "Hymns for Infant Minds." 

39 



64. 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 

WHITE ROBES. 
Rev. vii. 

Who are they in heaven who stand 
Clothed in white, at God's right hand, 
In their robes so fair and white, 
Bright and shining, like the light ? 

Harps of gold and palms they bear ; 
All are good and happy there ; 
Much I wonder whence they came, 
Who they are and what their name. 

They who now are praising God. 
Once the path of sorrow trod ; 
Now by Christ their Saviour led, 
Crowns of joy are on their head. 

They shall never weep again, 
Never know a grief or pain ; 
All is bright and shining day : 
God has wiped their tears away. 

May I also with them stand 
Eobed in white at God's right hand, 
And with joy for ever sing 
Praises to my God and King. 

D. A. T. 

HEAVEN. 

"In thy presence is fulness of joy; at thy right hand 
there are pleasures for evermore. n — Ps. xvi. 11. 

" There is beyond the sky 

A heaven of joy and love ; 
And holy children, when they die, 

Go to that world above." 

There perfect bliss is found, 

And pleasures never cease ; 
But through eternity abound, 

And still, and still increase. 
40 



65. 



PART I.] HYMNS FOR INFANTS. 

Lord of that world above ! 

Teach us to watch and pray, 
And never let our steps remove 

From life's delightful way. 

Help us to trust in Thee, 
And run the heavenly race ; 

Then take us, when by death set free, 
To see thee face to face. 



66. 



CHILDREN IN HEAVEN. 



Around the throne of God in heaven, 
Thousands of children stand : 

Children, whose sins are all forgiven, 
A holy, happy band, 

Singing glory, glory, glory. 

In flowing robes of spotless white 

See every one arrayed : 
Dwelling in everlasting light, 

And joys that never fade, 
Singing glory, glory, glory, 

Once they were little things like you, 

And lived on earth below, 
And could not praise, as now they do, 

The Lord who loved them so, 
Singing glory, glory, glory, 

What brought them to that world above. 

That heaven so bright and fair, 
Where all is peace, and joy, and love ? 

How came those children there, 
Singing glory, glory, glory ? 

Because the Saviour shed his blood 

To wash away their sin ; 
Bathed in that pure and precious flood. 

Behold them white and clean, 
Singing glory, glory, glory, 



41 



HYMNS FOR INFANTS. [PART I. 

On earth they sought their Saviour's grace, 

On earth they loved his name ; 
So now they see his blessed face, 

And stand before the Lamb, 
Singing glory, glory, glory.* 



67. 



BLESSEDNESS OF TRUE RELIGION. 



" Godliness is profitable unto all things, having promise 
of the life that now is, and of that which is to come." — 
1 Tim. iv. 8. 

'Tis religion that can give 
Sweetest pleasures while we live ; 
'Tis religion must supply 
Solid comfort when we die. 

After death, its joys will be 
Lasting as eternity : 
Be the living God my friend, 
Then my bliss shall never end. 

* " Hymns for Young" Minds." By Anne Houlditch. 



42 



PART SECOND. 
EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 



68. 



THE SENSE OF SEEING. 



The Lord is good, who gave to me 
The sense of sight, for I can see ; 
I see my father's cheerful look, 
He shows me pictures in the book : 
I love to climb upon his knee, 
And see him sweetly smile on me. 
And mother too, and sister dear, — 
How many things are pleasant here ! 
Our baby's face so soft and bright, 
Oh is not that a pretty sight ? 
When I go out I see the sky, 
And merry little birds that fly ; 
The houses, and the busy street, 
The garden and the flowers sweet, 
The daisied grass, the lofty tree, 
The blossoms and the busy bee. 
I see bright colours all around, 
In the blue sky and on the ground : 
I see the sun, the cheerful light, 
I'll praise the Lord, who gave me sight. 

43 



69. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 



GRATITUDE TO PARENTS. 



OF LITTLE WILLIAM S FATHER, WHO IS A 
LABOURER IN THE FIELDS. 

At early morn to plough he goes, 

Through wintry rain and sleet ; 

In summer, when he reaps and mows, 

He faints beneath the heat ; 

And what he earns he shares with me, 

How very thankful I should be ! 

OF LITTLE MARY'S FATHER, WHO IS A SHEPHERD. 

On hills and moors his days he spends 

In watching o'er his sheep ; 

His weak young lambs at night he tends, 

When I am fast asleep ; 

And what he earns he shares with me, 

How very thankful I should be ! * 

of little annie's father, who works in a 

FACTORY. 

My father works amidst the noise, 

And busy hum of men : 

And little he his home enjoys, 

Till Sunday comes again : 

Oh, happy day ! then may he see 

A grateful, loving child in me. 

70. MY LITTLE SISTER. 

I have a little sister, 

She is only two years old ; 
But to us at home, who love her, 

She is worth her weight in gold. 

We often play together ; 

And I begin to find, 
That to make my sister happy, 

I must be very kind ; 

" From the " Peep of Day." 
44 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

And always very gentle 

When we run about and play. 

Nor ever take her playthings 
Or little toys away. 

I must not vex or tease her, 

Nor ever angry be 
With the darling little sister 

That God has given me.* 

71. SONG FOR AN INFANT SCHOOL. 

Children go, to and fro 
In a merry, pretty row ; 
Footsteps light, faces bright, 
Tis a happy sight ; 
Swiftly turning round and round, 
Do not look upon the ground. 
Follow me full of glee, 
Singing merrily. 

Work is done, play's begun ; 
Now we have our laugh and fun. 
Happy days, pretty plays, 
And no naughty ways ; 
Holding fast each other's hand, 
We're a loving little band. 
Follow me, full of glee, 
Singing merrily. 

72. SONG FOR A RAINY DAY. 

The rain is falhng very fast, 

We can't get out to play ; 
But we are happy while in school, 

Though 'tis a rainy day. 
Then clap, clap, all together, 

Clap, clap away ; 
Oh ! the infant school's a happy place, 

Upon a rainy day. 

* From " The Child's Wreath." 

45 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART 

For while the rain comes pattering down 

We merrily sing our song ; 
And to hearts content and spirits light 

Time quickly speeds along. 
Then clap, clap, all together, &c. 

We listen all attentively, 

To what our teachers say, 
But when our lessons all are o'er 

'Tis then the time for play. 
Then clap, clap, &c. 

With smiling faces at our posts 

So orderly we stand, 
Then quickly turn and march away 

When master gives command. 
Then march, march, all together, &c. 



73. 



THANKS AND PRAISE. 

SONG FOR AN INFANT SCHOOL. 



Thus we sing as we march, and we march as we 

sing, 
And the joy of our hearts in our voices shall ring ; 
The little birds fill all the air with their glee, 
Yet the've not half so much to be glad of as we ; 
So with thrushes and blackbirds we'll joyfully sing 
All thanks to our Father, all praise to our King. 

The grasshopper chirps in the long summer grass, 
The frisking lambs bleat in the fields as we pass ; 
So with wee things and young things well joyfully 

sing 
All thanks to our Father, all praise to our King. 

The river shouts glad, as it dances along ; 
The little stream murmurs a sweet quiet song ; 
So with rivers and streamlets we'll joyfully sing 
All thanks to our Father, all praise to our King. 
46 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

The breezes sing soft 'mid the thick leaves of June ; 
E'en the hoarse wintry wind tries to whistle a tune ; 
So with soft winds and strong winds we'll joyfully 

sing 
All thanks to our Father, all praise to our King. 

Pleasant songs at his work hums the blithe busy bee. 
And well not be less blithe or less busy than he ; 
So with all busy creatures we'll joyfully sing 
All thanks to our Father, all praise to our King. 

Thus God gives a measure of gladness to all, 
And a share of his praises to great and to small ; 
So we who owe most will most thankfully sing, 
And our voices, tho' weak, to his footstool shall ring.* 



74. PLAY AND WORK. 

Oh ! how pleasant 'tis to see 
Little children full of glee, 
Full of frolic, full of mirth 
As the kitten on the hearth. 
Harmless as the little lamb 
Gaily sporting by its dam. 
Oh ! how pleasant 'tis to see, 
Little children full of glee. 

But we must not always play, 
Frolic days and months away ; 
Like the bee upon the wing, 
We must gather in the spring ; 
Summer comes and winter too, 
We shall find enough to do ; 
Let us learn as well as play, 
Mindful of a future day. tf. i . 

* By the Author of u Tales and Sketches of Christian Life. 

47 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

75. WHERE ALL IS LOVE. 

3IARCH FOR AN INFANT SCHOOL. 

Two and two, and hand in hand, 
Here we march, a happy band ; 
They are happiest in the land 

Where all is love. 

Two and two, both girls and boys, 
We march and sing with cheerful noise ; 
None have sorrows, all have joys 
Where all is love. 

Two and two, and arm in arm, 
Friendly, kindly, free from harm ; 
Who can tell how great the charm, 
Where all is love ! 

Two and two we march along, 
Singing still our cheerful song : 
All is right and nothing wrong, 

Where all is love ! 



76. 



fc8 



HAPPY AND FREE. 

MARCH FOR AN INFANT SCHOOL. 

Now let us march along, 
Singing our pleasant song, 

Hearts full of glee ; 
And while we softly tread, 
All by good humour led, 
We may hold up our head, 

Happy and free. 

Friends who are kind and good, 
Give us our clothes and food, 
Kind we should be ; 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Trying with all our might, 
As in our teacher's sight, 
To do what's good and right, 
Happy and free. 

When the loud tempest blows, 
When it hails, rains, or snows, 

Sheltered are we : 
But with a shining sun, 
When all our work is done, 
We may walk out or run, 

Happy and free. 

He who would spend the day 
Only in idle play, 

Foolish must be : 
He who from evil flies, 
And on God's truth relies, 
He will be truly wise, 

Happy and free. 

Then as we march along, 
Singing our pleasant song, 

Wise let us be : 
Dwelling in peace and love, 
Till we from earth remove, 
Then fly to heaven above, 

Happy and free. 



D. A. T 



77. MERRY AND WISE. 

MARCH FOR CHILDREN. 

Now steadily, steadily, let us walk, 
And merrily sing, or else soberly talk ; 
Hold up our heads high, and then point out our toe. 
And step altogether, wherever we go. 
Then cheerful and happy, a smile on our face. 
Keep all in right order of time and of place. 
Begin with the left foot, go on with the right. 
And march like good soldiers, but not for to light. 

e 49 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

We march like good soldiers, but live like good friends, 
In love and in peace till our travelling ends ; 
And so from our hearts and our voices shall rise 
One song and one chorus, Be merry and wise. 

D. A. T. 



78. AWAY WITH NEEDLESS SORROW. 

MARCH FOR CHILDREN. 

Away with needless sorrow, 

Though troubles may befall, 
A brighter day to-morrow 

May shine upon us all. 
We still may march together 

Wlien rain is falling fast, 
And wet and windy weather 

Will turn to fair at last, 

Then away with needless sorrow, &c. 

We cannot tell the reason 

For all the clouds we see, 
Yet every time and season 

Must wisely ordered be. 
Let us but do our duty 

In sunshine and in rain, 
And Heaven all bright with beauty 

Will bring us joy again. 

Then away with needless sorrow, &c 

Though evening skies should lower, 

The morning may be fine, 
For He who sends the shower 

Can cause his sun to shine ; 
Then away with needless sorrow, 

Though trouble should befall, 
A brighter day to-morrow 

May shine upon us all. 

d. a. t. 
~>0 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

79. EARLY RISING. 

Up in the morning's cheerful light, 

Up in the morning early ; 
The sun is shining warm and bright, 
And the birds are singing cheerily. 

Now summer dews are on the grass, 

Hanging pure and pearly, 
And morning moments quickly pass : 

Up in the morning early. 

Heard you not the blackbird's song ? 

Loud he sings and cheerily ; 
I shall be with you ere 'tis long, 

Tripping light and merrily. 

Up in the morning's cheerful light, 
The dew is pure and pearly ; 

The sun is shining warm and bright, 
And the birds are singing cheerily. 

M. A. STODART. 

g() # ON EARLY ATTENDANCE AT 
SCHOOL. 
Come, sister, let us haste to school, 
Or we shall break that happy rule ; 
For teacher says, we should be there 
By nine o'clock — the hour of prayer. 

'Tis almost nine, I must away, 
I cannot stop to talk or play : 
I'll wash my face, and comb my hair, 
And so get there in time for prayer. 

It is in prayer that we shall find 
The Lord so very good and kind : 
O never let us heedless prove, 
But truly seek our Father's love. 

His smile, his blessing, through the day, 
Are worth a thousand hours of play ; 
Let us endeavour to be there 
Every day in time for prayer. 

e2 51 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 



81. 



ATTENTION. 

A GALLERY SONG. 



82. 



52 



Now let us watch our teacher's hands, 

Just what he does we'll do : 
And up and down, and round and round, 

His movements we'll pursue. 

He lifts them very slowly up, 

We slowly raise up ours, 
And now they stop — and see, they drop, 

Both hands he slowly lowers. 

Now round and round they gently move, 

Now back again they turn, 
Now this way round — then that way round, 

To follow him we learn. 

Both hands he puts upon his head, 
Now straight in front you see ; 

One finger now, upon each brow — 
Then softly on his knee. 

Oh ! that in every other thing, 

We copied what is good, 
And took delight to do what's right, 

As closely as we could. 

ONE THING AT A TIME. 

Work while you work, 

Play while you play, 
That is the way 

To be cheerful and gay. 

All that you do, 

Do with your might ; 
Things done by halves 

Are never done right. 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

One thing each time, 

And that done well, 
Is a very good rule, 

As many can tell. 

Moments are useless 

Trifled away ; 
So work while you work, 

And play while you play. 

M. A. STODART. 



83. 



PERSEVERANCE; OR, TRY AGAIN. 

'Tis a lesson you should heed, 
Try, try, try, again. 

If at first you don't succeed; 

Try, try, try, again. 

Then your courage should appear ; 

For if you will persevere, 

You will conquer, never fear, 
Try, try, try again. 

Once or twice though you may fail, 

Try, try, try again. 
If at last you would prevail, 

u Tr 7> tr y> tr 7 a S ain - 
If we strive 'tis no disgrace, 
Though we may not win the race ; 
What should we do in that case ? 
Try, try, try again. 

If you find your task is hard, 

Try, try, try again. 

Time will bring you your reward, 
Try, try, try again. 

All that other people do, 

Why with patience should not you ? 

Only keep this rule in view — 

Try, try, try again. 



53 



EAST VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

84. AFTERNOON SCHOOL SONG FOR 
AN INFANT SCHOOL. 

Hark ! the old church bell is booming 

One and two, one and two ; 
Merrily through the street we're coming 

Two and two, two and two. 

Pinafores and hands and faces 

White and clean, white and clean ; 

Happy faces in their places 
Must be seen, must be seen. 

Teacher will be there to meet us, 
We'll not be late, we'll not be late, 

With kind looks and words to greet us, 
She must not wait, she must not wait. 

Pretty pictures she will show us, 

Look and learn, look and learn, * 

Of things above, around, below us, 

Turn and turn, turn and turn. 

Pretty pictures, useful lessons, 

Old and new, old and new ; 
Stories from God's book of blessing, 

Good and true, good and true. 

Telling of the love He bears us, 

You and me, you and me ; 
Telling of the gift he gave us, 

Great and free, great and free.* 



85. 



THE CRUST OF BREAD. 

I must not throw upon the floor 

The crust I cannot eat ; 
For many little hungry ones 

Would think it quite a treat. 

By the Author of " Tales and Sketches of Christian Life.'' 
54 



PART n.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

My parents labour very hard 
To get me wholesome food ; 

Then I must never waste a bit, 
That would do others good. 

For wilful waste makes woeful want, 

And I may live to say, 
Oh ! how I wish I had the bread 

That once I threw away ! 



85* 



AGAINST WASTE. 



Only see, little girl, what a waste you have made, 
Your milk you have spilt, and you've crumbled 

your bread. 
How many poor children have little to eat, 
And would thankfully take the least morsel of meat ! 

And far more than that — when five thousand were 

fed 
With two little fishes and five loaves of bread, 
Though our Lord fed them all without labour or 

cost, 
Yet the fragments were gathered that nought might 

be lost. 

His eye upon you at this moment is placed, 

He gave you your breakfast — he likes not that 

waste ; 
So pick up the crumbs — there are some on the floor, 
And try, my dear child, not to waste any more. 

M. A. STODART. 



86. 



THE STAR. 



Twinkle, twinkle, little star, 
How I wonder what you are ! 
Up above the world so high, 
Like a diamond in the sky. 

55 



86. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

When the blazing sun is gone, 
When he nothing shines upon, 
Then you show jour little light, 
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night. 

Then the traveller in the dark, 
Thanks you for your tiny spark ; 
He could not tell which way to go, 
If you did not twinkle so. 

In the dark blue sky you keep, 
And often through my curtains peep ; 
For you never shut your eye, 
Till the sun is in the sky. 

As your bright and tiny spark 
Lights the traveller in the dark, 
Though I know not what you are, 
Twinkle, twinkle, little star. 

NURSERY RHYMES. 

THE STAR. 



" Twinkle, twinkle, little star, 
How I wonder what you are ! 
Up above the world so high, 
Like a diamond in the sky." 

Who was it made thy tiny light, 
Sparkling in the darkest night ? 
Whose hand doth hold thee up so far, 
When thou twinklest, little star ? 

'Twas God who made thee shine so bright, 
The God who gave me life and light ; 
And though you're beautiful, bright star, 
Yet God doth love me, better far. 

For Jesus spake the word, and thou 
Didst shine at first as thou dost now ; 
But oh ! that Jesus died for me, 
And thus God loves me more than thee. 
06 



PART II. J EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

And though thou lookest bright and free, 
Thou will wax old, and changed shall be ; 
But God shall make me brighter far 
When thou art faded, twinkling star.* 

Montague Stanley. 



87. 



88. 



GOD IS GOOD. 

God is good ! the pleasant flowers 
Growing in the fair greenwood, 

And this pretty world of ours, 
Tell us children God is good. 

The sparkling brook that runs along, 
"Where so often we have stood, 

Sings for us a gentle song, 

Saying, " Children, God is good !" 

The birds that flutter, warbling gay 
To their happy nestling brood, 

Could they speak to us, would say, 
" Little children, God is good !" 

He provides us, day by day, 

Home and clothing, friends and food ; 
Should we not, then, always pray — 

"Make, O make us children good !"t 

ON INSTINCT. 



Who taught the bird to build her nest 

Of wool, and hay, and moss ? 
Who taught her how to weave it best, 

And lay the twigs across ? 

* Mr. Stanley was so much delighted with the first verse of 
these beautifully simple lines, that being unable to procure 
the remaining verses, he composed those now given, for his 
little boy to sing. 

t " Songs for the Young." Edited by C. H. Purday. 

57 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

Who taught the busy bee to fly 

Among the sweetest flowers ; 
And lay her store of honey by, 

To eat in winter hours ? 

Who taught the little ants the way 

Their narrow holes to bore, 
And through the pleasant summer's day 

To gather up their store ? 

'Twas God who taught them all the way, 

And gave their little skill, 
And teaches children, when they pray, 

To do His holy will. 

HYMNS FOR INFANT SCHOOLS. 



89. 



90. 



58 



THE BUTTERFLY. 

The pretty little butterfly 
We know by God was made ; 

And spots and streaks of various dye 
Upon its wings are laid. 

He made those wings, and it can rise 

Far, far above my head ; 
And he has taught it how to know 

On what it may be fed. 

Not all the men in all the world 

Can make one if they try ; 
The power belongs to God alone 

To form a butterfly. 
Then surely I should never dare 

To be unkind at all ; 
Nor hurt whatever God has made, 

Although it be but small. 

THE LITTLE FLY. 

Little fly — little fly, 
You may lift your wings and try, 
You will never reach the sky, 
It was not made for you : 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

You may frisk about, and play 
In the sunshine all the day, 
But when sunshine goes away, 
Then — what will you do ? 

Little fly— little fly,— 

God, who made both earth and skies, 

He can give me wings to rise 

Up to him in heaven ; 
Here I read of him and pray, 
Learn to love him and obey ; — 
Holy keep the Sabbath day ; — 

God's one day in seven. 
Little fly— little fly,— 
Which is happiest, you or I ? 



d. A. T. 



91. THE LITTLE BUSY BEE. 

How doth the little busy bee 

Improve each shining hour, 
And gather honey all the day 

From every opening flower ! 

How skilfully she builds her cell ; 

How neat she spreads her wax ; 
And labours hard to store it well 

With the sweet food she makes. 

In works of labour, as of skill, 

I would be busy to ; 
For Satan finds some mischief still 

For idle hands to do. 

In books, or work, or healthful play, 

Let my first years be past ; 
That I may give, for every day, 

Some good account at last. 

59 



92. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 



LITTLE PUSSY. 



Come, little brother, come with me, 
I've something you will like to see ; 
Its eyes are round and very bright, 
Its breast is beautifully white. 
Its back and sides are striped with gray ; 
Like you, its very fond of play ; 
And playthings easily are found, 
Its tail it chases round and round, 
Darts after mother's ball of wool, 
Springs at the corners of the stool, 
Then bounds away, and quick returns, 
And ever some new antic learns. 
Twill fill your laughing eyes with glee 
Its many playful tricks to see ; 
But you must be a gentle child, 
And not make little pussy wild, 
But softly stroke her glossy fur, 
And listen till you hear her purr. 
So, darling brother, come with me, 
My pretty little puss to see. 



93. 



THE LITTLE DOG. 



I'll never hurt my little dog, 
But stroke and pat its head ; 
I like to see it wag its tail, 
I like to see it fed. 

Poor little dogs are very good, 
And very useful too ; 
For do you know that they will mind 
What they are bid to do ? 

Then I will never beat my dog, 
Nor ever give him pain, 
But treat him kindly every day, 
And he will love again. 
60 



PART H.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

94. THE COW. 

Thank you, pretty cow, that made 
Pleasant milk to soak my bread, 
Every day, and every night, 
Warm, and fresh, and sweet and white. 

Do not chew the hemlock rank, 
Growing on the weedy bank ; 
But the yellow cowslips eat, 
They will make it very sweet. 

Where the purple violet grows. 
Where the bubbling water flows, 
Where the grass is fresh and fine, 
Pretty cow, go there and dine. 

NURSERY RHYMES. 



95 



A VISIT TO THE LAMBS. 

Mamma, let's go and see the lambs ; 

This warm and sunny day 
I think must make them very glad, 
And full of fun and play. 

Ah ! there they are ; you pretty things, 

Now don't you run away ; 
I'm come on purpose with mamma 

To see you this fine day. 

What pretty little heads you've got. 

And such good-natured eyes, 
And ruffs of wool all round your necks, 

How nicely curled it lies ! 

Come here, you little trembler, come, 

And lick my hand, now do ; 
How silly to be so afraid ! 

Indeed I'll not hurt you. 

Just put your hand upon its back, 

Mamma, how nice and warm :, 
There, pretty lamb, you see I don't 

Intend to do you harm. 

61 



96. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 



THE HORSE. 



No one deserves to have a horse, 
Who takes delight to beat him ; 

The wise will choose a better course, 
And very kindly treat him. 

If ever it should be my lot 

To have, for use or pleasure, 
One who could safely walk or trot, 

That horse would be a treasure. 

He soon should learn my voice to know, 

And I would gently lead him ; 
And should he to the stable go, 

I'd keep him clean and feed him. 

I'd teach my horse a steady pace, 

Because, if he should stumble 
Upon a rough or stony place, 

We both might have a tumble. 

Should he grow aged, I would still 

My poor old servant cherish ; 
I could not see him weak or ill, 

And leave my horse to perish. 

For should he get too weak to be 

My servant any longer, 
I'd send him out to grass, quite free, 

And get another, — stronger. 

1). a. x. 



97. 



THE SQUIRREL. 



Ay, there's the squirrel perched aloft, 

That active little rover ; 
See how he whisks his bushy tail, 
Which shadows him all over. 
62 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Now rapid as a raj of light 

He darts up yon tall beech ! 
He skips along from branch to branch, 

And now the top can reach. 

Now view him seated on the bough, 

To crack his nuts at ease, 
While blackbirds sing, and stock-doves coo, 

Amid the neighbouring trees. 

The light wind lifts his silky hair, 

So long and loosely flowing ; 
His quick ear catches every sound — 

How brisk he looks, and knowing ! 

With cunning glance he casts around 

His merry sparkling eye : 
In yonder hazel, by the brook, 

Rich clusters he can spy. 

His lofty station soon he quits, 

To seize the milky store ; 
You ne'er can catch him, dearest child, 

The useless chase give o'er. 

The butterfly you once surprised, 

And had him in your power, 
While he his painted wings displayed 

Upon the passion-flower. 

As in the foxglove's bell he dived, 

You caught the humble bee ; 
Examined well his velvet coat, 

Then gave him liberty. 

With lambkins you might run a race, 
Though swift they hied away, 

The nimble kid attempt to chase 
Along the healthy brae ; 

But little squirrel's more alert 

Than butterfly or bee ; 
No lamb or kid is half so light, 

So swift of foot as he. 

63 



98. 



99. 



64 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

Come, dearest child, the chase give o'er, 

And, in this pleasant shade, 
Let us remember Him whose love 

Has all these creatures made. 

THE LITTLE CHILD'S SONG 
ABOUT THE BIRDS. 
I. 

If ever I see, 

On bush or tree, 
Young birds in their little nest. 

I must not, in my play, 

Steal those young birds away, 
To grieve their poor mother's breast, 

H. 

My mother, I know, 

Would sorrow so, 
Should I be stol'n away ; 

So I'll speak to the birds 

In my softest words, 
And watch them while they play. 

in. 

And when they can fly 

In the bright blue sky, 
They'll warble their song to me ! 

I think, were I sad, 

It would make me glad 
To think they were happy and free. 

THE BIRD'S NEST. 
I would not be a cruel boy 

For all this world could give ; 
Why should I take away the joy 

Of those who happy live ? 

God made the bird, and gave it wings 

To bear it through the air ; 
When on the tree it sits and sings, 

He makes it happy there. 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Her little nest so soft and warm. 

God teaches her to make it ; 
I would not dare to do her harm, 

I would not dare to take it. 

If God should say, "Where is my bird, 
The pretty bird I made ?" 

I could not answer Him a word, 
For I should be afraid. 

But children that are good and kind 
Need never frightened be ; 

When I do right, I always find 
God very kind to me. 

Go, pretty bird, and build your nest 
With twigs, and straws, and moss ; 

There with your little nurslings rest, 
You need not fear then* loss. 

Go, pretty bird, and fly away ; 

Be happy and be free ; 
And I may live to see the day 

When you shall sing to me. 



D. A. I. 



100. 



TO A LARK. 

Ah ! little lark, I see you there, 

So very, very high ! 
Just like a little tiny speck 

Upon the clear blue sky. 

How good is he who strengthens thus 
Your slight and tender wing, 

And teaches such a little throat 
So sweet a song to sing. 



65 



101. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

THE LARK. 



Hark ! hark t the lark, with fluttering wing. 

Has risen with the sun ; 
In sweet harmonious notes to sing, 

And teach its new-fledged young. 

Hark ! how it sings, while mounting high. 

And chanting in the air, 
As if it fain would reach the sky, 

To echo praises there. 

Hark ! does it say, as up it flies, 

Come, children, join my lays ; 
You little creatures, can you rise, 

And sing your Maker's praise ? 

Yes, pretty bird, our minds can soar,. 

Though in our school we stand ; 
And we can echo praises o'er, 

Though but an infant band. 



102. 



THE KIND LITTLE BOY. 



Have you ever heard of a dear little bird, 

That fled all about through the cold and the sleet ; 

And hither, and thither, and no one knows whither, 
Went hopping about on his cold little feet ? 

For the frost was all round, and the snow on the 
ground, 

And this poor little bird could find nothing to eat. 

When a kind little boy, as he saw him flit by, 

Thought how hungry and cheerless and cold he 
must be, 
So out to him he comes, with a handful of crumbs, 

And scattered them round for the birdie to see — 
When the bird saw them flung, only think how he 
sung, 
And while picking them up how delighted was he ! 
66 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

103. TO A REDBREAST. 

Little bird, with bosom red, 
Welcome to my humble shed, 
Daily near mj table steal, 
While I pick my scanty meal. 
Doubt not, little though there be, 
But I'll cast a crumb to thee ; 
Well repaid, if I but spy 
Pleasure in thy glancing eye ; 
See thee, when thou'st ate thy fill, 
Plume thy breast, and wipe thy bill. 
Come, my feather'd friend again ! 
Well thou know'st the broken pane. 
Ask of me thy daily store ; 
Ever welcome to my door ! 



104. 



THE ROBIN. 



See, James, what a sweet little prize I have found ! 
A robin, that lay half-benumbed on the ground ! 
I caught him, and fed him, and warmed in my 

breast, 
And now he's as nimble and blithe as the rest. 
Look, look how he flutters ! he'll slip from my hold ; 
Ah, rogue ! you've forgotten both hunger and cold ! 
But, indeed, 'tis in vain, for I shan't set you free. 
For all your whole life you're a prisoner with me. 
Well housed and well fed, in your cage you will 

sing, 
And make our dull winter as gay as the spring. 
But stay — sure 'tis cruel, with wings made to soar. 
To be shut up in prison and never fly more ; 
And I who so often have longed for a flight. 
Shall I keep you prisoner ? Oh no ! 'tis not right ! 
No, come, pretty robin, I must set you free. 
For your whistle, though sweet, would sound sadl} 

to me ! 

f2 67 



105. 



106. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

KINDNESS TO ANIMALS. 

Little children, never give . 
Pain to things that feel and live, 
Let the gentle robin come 
For the crumbs you save at home. 
Never hurt the timid hare, 
Peeping from her green grass lair ; 
Let her come and sport and play 
On the lawn at close of day. 
The little lark goes soaring high, 
To the bright and sunny sky ; 
Oh ! let him sing his happy song, 
Nor do these gentle creatures wrong. 

THE SPARROW. 

Glad to see you, little bird, 
'Twas your pretty chirp I heard : 
What did you intend to say ? 
" Give me something this cold day ?" 

That I will, and plenty, too ; 
All these crumbs I saved for you ; 
Don't be frightened — here's a treat ; 
I will wait and see you eat. 

Frost and snow have made you bold ; 
I'll not hurt you, though I'm told 
There are many reasons why 
Every sparrow ought to die. 

Thomas says you steal his wheat, 
John complains his plums you eat ; 
Choose the ripest for your share, 
Never asking whose they are. 

Shocking tales I hear of you ; 
Chirp, and toll me, are they true ? 
Robbing all the summer long : 
Don't you think it very wrong ? 
68 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Yet you seem an honest bird ; 
Don't be vex'd at what I've heard : 
Now, no grapes or plums you eat ; 
Now, you cannot steal the wheat. 

So I will not try to know 
What you did so long ago : 
There's your breakfast, eat away, 
Come and see me every day.* 



107. 



THE SPARROW. 



Upon a bed of sickness laid, 

An open window near 
Gave me a sound — as though it said, 

A child of want is here. 

It was a prayer that rose on high, 

Although no words I heard — 
It was a quick repeated cry — 

The chirrup of a bird. 

And was there One who would attend 

That faint and feeble cry ? 
Was there an ever-present friend 

Who would its wants supply ? 

yes ! the Lord's great name be praised, 

His ever-open ear — 
There's not a cry in trouble raised 

But that is bent to hear. 

But will the Lord for sparrows care, 

Who cannot speak a word ? 
Will God stoop down to hear the prayer — 

The chirrup of a bird ? 

yes ! it is the Lord who gives 

Both life and its supply 
To every moving thing that lives, 

Or it must faint and die. 

From " The Child's Book of Poetry." 

69 



EAST VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II- 

There's not a bird can hop around, 

Or traverse through the air, 
Or pick a crumb from off the ground, 

But God first placed it there. 

Then let us come to God with prayer, 

And seek him day by day — 
The Lord who does for sparrows care, 

Will hear when children pray. 

D. A. T. 

108# THE HEN AND HER BROOD; OR, 
THE COTTAGE-DOOR. 

See the chickens round the gate, 
For their morning portion wait ; 
Fill the basket from the store, 
Open wide the cottage-door : 
Throw out crumbs, and scatter seed, 
Let the hungry chickens feed. 
Call them — now how fast they run, 
Gladly, quickly, every one ; 
Eager, busy hen and chick, 
Every little morsel pick. 
See the hen with callow brood, 
To her young how kind and good ; 
With what care their steps she leads, 
Them, and not herself, she feeds ; 
Picking here, and picking there, 
Where the nicest morsels are, 
As she calls, they flock around, 
Bustling all along the ground ; 
Till their daily labours cease, 
And at night they rest in peace, 
All the little tiny things 
Nestling close beneath her wings ; 
There she keeps them safe and warm, 
Free from fear and free from harm. 
Now, my little child, attend : 
Your Almighty Father, Friend, 
70 



FART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Though unseen by mortal eye, 

Watches o'er you from on high. 

Though no creature can express 

God's kind care and tenderness ; 

Yet are you, by day and night, 

In your heavenly Parents sight. 

As the hen her chickens leads, 

Shelters, cherishes, and feeds ; 

So by him your feet are led, 

Over you his wings are spread. 

All the children of his care 

In his gentle pity share ; 

He, in whom all goodness dwells, 

He, whose love all love excels ; 

He, your every want supplies, 

And this Parent never dies. 

May you by his grace be taught 

Here to love him as you ought, 

Then to him, in heaven raise 

Songs of everlasting praise. d. a. t. 

109. THE FLOWERS. 

The children of an infant school, 

Whene'er allowed to play, 
Should neither fruit nor blossoms pull, 

Nor on the borders stray. 

But we may look upon them all, 
Their names and colors tell, 

And may around the garden-wall 
Their pleasing fragrance smell. 

Without the sun, nor hill nor plain 
Could yield us fruit or flowers ; 

Nor could they flourish, if the rain 
Fell not in gentle showers. 

'Tis thus within each infant heart 

No holy seed can grow, 
Till Jesus does his grace impart, 

And light and warmth bestow. 

71 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

110. BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES. 

Buttercups and daisies, 

Oh, the pretty flowers ; 
Coming ere the spring time, 

To tell of sunny hours. 
While the trees are leafless, 

While the fields are bare, 
Buttercups and daisies 

Spring up here and there. 

Ere the snow-drops peepeth ; 

Ere the crocus bold ; 
Ere the early primrose 

Opes its paly gold, 
Somewhere on a sunny bank 

Buttercups are bright ; 
Somewhere 'mong the frozen grass 

Peeps the daisy white. 

Little hardy flowers, 

Like to children poor, 
Playing in their sturdy health 

By their mother's door. 
Purple with the north-wind, 

Yet alert and bold ; 
Fearing not, and caring not, 

Though they be a-cold ! 



I 



72 



What to them is weather ! 

What are stormy showers 
Buttercups and daisies 

Are these human flowers ! 
He who gave them hardships 

And a life of care, 
Gave them likewise hardy strength 

And patient hearts to bear. 

Mary Howitt. 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

111. THE VIOLET. 

Down in a green and shady bed, 

A modest violet grew ; 
Its stalk was bent, it hung its head, 

At if to hide from view. 

And yet it was a lovely flower, 
Its colours bright and fair ; 

It might have graced a rosy bower, 
Instead of hiding there. 

Yet there it was content to bloom, 

In modest tints arrayed ; 
And there diffused a sweet perfume, 

Within the silent shade. 

Then let me to the valley go, 

This pretty flower to see ; 
That I may also learn to grow 

In sweet humility. 

ORIGINAL POEMS. 



112. 



THE BUD. 

Pretty bud, I love to see 
Much in you resembling me ; 
And, from your instructive look, 
Learn, as from a little book. 

I am young, and so are you, 
Life with us is fresh and new ; 
Yet fair buds oft withered lie, 
And the youngest children die. 

Riper flowers may wide expand, 
Win the eye and court the hand ; 
But, like you, oh may I be 
Graced with humble modesty. 



73 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

When 'tis evening, dark and chill, 
Close you wrap yourself from ill ; 
So may God my heart secure 
Safe from every thing impure. 

And as, when the sun is up, 
You expand your little cup ; 
So thy beams may I possess, 
Christ, the Sun of Righteousness.* 

s. w. P. 

113. THE MARCH GARLANDS. 

Oh! I've gather'd a nosegay, so brilliant and bright, 
Of the crocus, and primrose, and violet white ; 
With the daffodil gay, that bent low to the blast, 
Till it rear'd its bright head, and told winter was 
past. 

I'll blend them together in garlands so fair, 
Mezereon and laurel, they, too, shall be there ; 
And the poplar's red blossom, and sallow -tree's 

bloom, 
Shall cheer the dark yew of its sadness and gloom. 
But when from these flowers all beauty is past, 
The laurel shall shine bright and green to the last ; 
So beauty, like them, shall soon vanish away, 
But worth, like the laurel, shall never decay. 



THE MAY GARLAND. 



113.* 

Come, see our new garland so green and so gay, 
'Tis the first fruits of spring and the glory of May : 
Here are cowslips, and daisies, and hyacinths blue ; 
Here are buttercups bright, and anemones too ; 
Here the pansies all varied, and hawthorn so sweet, 
And the violets fragrant together do meet ; 
But yet there's no garland that we may entwine 
Like a garland of virtues, unfading, divine. 

* From " The Child's Book of Poetry." 
74 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR IXFAXTS. 



114. 



THE INFANTS MAY-DAY SONG. 



The flowers are blooming everywhere, 

On every hill and dell ; 
And, oh ! how beautiful they are, 

How sweetly, too, they smell ! 

The little birds they spring along, 

And look so glad and gay ; 
I love to hear their pleasant song, — 

I feel as glad as they. 

The young lambs bleat and frisk about, 
The bees hum round their hive ; 

The butterflies are coming out ; 
'Tis good to be alive ! 

The trees that looked so stiff and grey, 
With green wreaths now are hung : 

mother ! let me laugh and play, 
I cannot hold my tongue. 

See, yonder bird spreads out his wings, 
And mounts the clear blue skies ; 

And, hark ! how merrily he sings, 
As far away he flies. 

Go forth, my child, and laugh and play, 

And let your cheerful voice 
With birds and brooks, and merry May, 

Cry out, Rejoice, rejoice ! 

1 would not check your bounding mirth, 

My happy little boy ; 
For He who made this blooming earth, 
Smiles on an infant's joy. 

115. THE SPRING MORNING. 

Get up, little sister, the morning is bright, 
And the birds are all singing to welcome the light ; 
The buds are all opening — the dew's on the flower ; 
If you shake but a branch, see, there falls quite a 
shower. 

7-3 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

By the side of their mothers, look under the trees, 
How the young lambs are skipping about as they 

please ; 
And, by all those rings on the water, I know 
The fishes are merrily swimming below. 

The bee, I dare say, has been long on the wing, 
To get honey from every flower of the spring ; 
For the bee never idles, but labours all day, 
And thinks ( wise little insect !) work better than play. 

The lark's singing gaily ; it loves the bright sun, 
And rejoices that now the gay spring is begun ; 
For the spring is so cheerful, I think 'twould be 

wrong, 
If we did not feel happy to hear the lark's song. 

Get up, for when all things are merry and glad, 
Good children should never be lazy and sad ; 
For God gives us day -light, dear sister, that we 
May rejoice like the lark, and may work like the 
bee. 

LADY FLORA HASTINGS. 



116. 



THE SUMMER MORNING. 



How beautiful the morning, 
When summer days are long ; 

0, we will rise betimes and hear 
The wild bird's happy song — 

For when the sun pours down his ray, 
The bird will cease to sing ; 

She'll seek the cool and silent shade, 
And sit with folded wing. 

How beautiful the morning — 
'Tis nature's sweetest hour ! 

While pearls of dew adorn the grass, 
And fragrance fills the flowers. 
76 



PART H.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS, 

How beautiful the morning ! 

Come let us bound abroad, 
And fill our hearts with melody, 

And raise our songs to God.* 



117. 



CHILD'S WELCOME TO SPRING 



Fm very glad the spring is come — the sun shines 

out so bright, 
The little birds upon the trees are singing for 

delight ; 
The young grass looks so fresh and green, the 

lambkins sport and play, 
And I can skip and run about as merrily as they. 

I like to see the daisy and the buttercups once more, 
The primrose and the cowslip, too, and every pretty 

flower ; 
I like to see the butterfly fluttering her painted wing, 
And all things seem just like myself, so pleased to 

see the spring. 

The fishes in the little brook are jumping up on 

high, 
The lark is singing sweetly as she mounts into the 

sky; 
The rooks are building up their nests upon the great 

tall tree, 
And every thing's as busy and as happy as can be. 

There's not a cloud upon the sky, there's nothing 

dark or sad, 
I jump, and scarce know what to do, I feel so very 

glad: 
God must be very good, indeed, who made each 

pretty thing, 
I'm sure we ought to love him much for bringing 

back the spring. 

M. A. STODART. 
* From •« The Child's Wreath." 

77 



118. 



119. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

A MIDSUMMER'S SONG. 

come, let us go to the meadows, 

It is a fine summer day ! 
The men have been mowing the grass, 

And the people are making hay. 

And all the beautiful flowers, 
The yellow, and white, and red, 

That looked so gay in the morning, 
Are now cut down and dead. 

And let us think when we see them 

Of what the Scriptures say — 
That we are like the flowers, 

So soon we pass away ; 

That this short life is given 

To seek the things above, 
And learn the way to heaven 

Through our Redeemer's love. 

For thus we may learn some lesson, 

Whenever we walk abroad ; 
And the beautiful flowers and meadows 

May help to lead us to God. 

AN AUTUMN SONG. 

Far, far o'er hill and dale, 

Green woods are changing, 
Autumn, her many hues 

Slowly arranging : 
And o'er the smiling land, 
Fruits, as the countless sands, 
God pours, from open hand, 

With love unchanging. 

See to the harvest field 

Gleaners have hasted, 
Gathering the scattered ears, — 

None should be wasted ; 



78 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Freely we all receive, 
Freely then we should give ; 
On Him "in whom we live," 
All our care casting. 

Spring came, and passed away, 

Summer is ending ; 
Autumn will soon decay, 

With winter blending : 
While time is given us here, 
Oh, may we prize it dear ! 
In love and godly fear 

Each moment spending ! 

Life has its seasons, too, 

Blooming and fading — 
We're in its spring-time now, 

Flowery paths treading. 
Teachers the good seed sow — 
Autumn our fruit will show — 
Oh ! pray that it may grow, 

Unto heaven leading. 

120. A WINTER SONG. 

When winter winds are blowing, 

So stormy and so high, 
And very fast 'tis snowing, 

And very dark the sky ; 
How thankful we should then be 

For house and home and food, 
To God who keeps us safe from harm, 

And always does us good ! 

His mercy watches o'er us 

In every season still, 
Nor cold nor heat can harm us, 

Unless it be his will ; 
If he send pain or sorrow, 

He still will be our stay — 
Then "let the unknown morrow 

"Bring with it what it may. 

79 



EAST VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

" It can bring with it nothing 

"But he will bear us through ; 
"Who gives the lilies clothing, 

"Will clothe his people too ; 
"Beneath the spreading heavens 

"No creature but is fed, 
"And he who feeds the ravens, 

"Will give his children bread." 

Oh ! may we do his will then, 

In our appointed place ; 
And labour, "working with our hands ; " 

Still praying for his grace, 
To help us love and serve him 

Whose life for us was given — 
To turn us from our sinful ways, 

And train us up for heaven 

121. SEED TIME AND HARVEST. 

"Why waste the wheat I see you throw 
About the fields in handfuls so ? " 
Thus asked a child, with curious eye, 
When his fond father made reply : 
"It is not waste ; the seed I drop 
Will bring a noble harvest crop. 
When winter's frost, and winter's rain, 
And summer's suns have reached my grain, 
And, when, in answer to my prayer, 
My God has kindly blest it there ; 
Autumn will smile, and all I spread 
Will furnish thee and me with bread. 
Hence learn this moral : Who would reap, 
Must toil, and wait, and patience keep, 
And praise, and pray, and win from heaven 
Blessings to faith and working given. 
And little children that would rise 
Must make a willing sacrifice 
Of time, and ease, and pleasures now, 
Just as I harrow, sow, and plough." 
80 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

122. "NEVER MAN SPAKE LIKE THIS MAN. 

John vii. 46. 

From everything our Saviour saw 
Lessons of wisdom he would draw ; 
The clouds, the colours in the sky ; 
The gentle breeze that whispers by ; 
The fields, all white with waving corn ; 
The lilies that the vale adorn ; 
The reed that trembles in the wind ; 
The tree where none its fruit can find ; 
The sliding sand, the flinty rock 
That bears unmoved the tempest's shock ; 
The thorns that on the earth abound ; 
The tender grass that clothes the ground ; 
The little birds that fly in air ; 
The sheep that need the shepherd's care ; 
The pearls that deep in ocean lie ; 
The gold that charms the miser's eye — 
All from his lips some truth proclaim, 
Or learn to tell their Maker's name. * 



122.*"WHO IS LIKE UNTO THE LORD 
OUR GOD?"— Ps. cxiii. 5. 

Oh ! who is like the God of grace, 
Filling the high and holy place, 
Yet looking from his throne of bliss 
Upon a world so low as this ? 

The Hand that spread the starry sky. 
Preserves the sparrows as they fly ; 
And He, who spans the earth we tread, 
Counts every hair that clothes the head, f 

* From "The Great Exemplar." 
t From t: Creation." 
G 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

123. THE HEAVENLY BODIES PRAISE 
THE LORD. 

The glorious sun, so dazzling bright, 
The moon that sheds her milder light, 

And all the stars in glory, 
From night to night, from day to day, 
As they pursue their shining way, 

Repeat their wondrous story. 

As servants, at their Lord's command, 
They go to earth's most distant land, 

His holy word obeying ; 
Without a voice, without a sound, 
They speak his praise to all around, 

Their Maker's name displaying. 

May I from them a lesson learn, 
And never from my duty turn ; 

Forsake my Saviour !— never ; 
They praise him best who do his will, 
And, oh ! may I, delighted, still 

Thus praise his name for ever ! 



D. A. 



124. 



THE SNOW-STORM. 



I marked at eve the snow flakes fall 

So gently all around ; 
Like lightest feathers down they came, 

And softly touched the ground. 

And as with ceaseless shower they fell 

Upon each shrub and tree, 
The brilliant wreaths which there they hung 

Were beautiful to see. 

But when the early night closed in, 

The winds came howling by ; 
They tore the wreaths from off the bough, 

And whirled them through the sky. 

82 



PART H.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Where are the poor and friendless now — 

Children of want and woe ? 
How many feel the bitter wind, 

And cold and driving snow. 

How many, chill'd and pale with fear, 

To some lone garret creep ; 
And there, with scarce a covering, 

Lie down to wake and weep. 

While I, beside a blazing fire, 

My cheerful hours can spend ; 
And see, whene'er I lift my eye, 

A kind and smiling friend. 

And when the huge clock tells the hour 

That I to bed must go, 
That friend will see me wrapp'd up well 

With covering white as snow. 

And then, with sweet and earnest voice, 

Will breathe a gentle prayer, 
That God would bless her darling boy, 

And guard him sleeping there. 

And oh ! to Him who rules the storm 

How thankful should I be, 
For such a home, and such a friend 

To watch and care for me ! 

American. 



125. 



THE STORM. 

The air is chill, the rain falls fast, 
And dark and wintry is the night, 
Keen is the bleak and stormy blast, 
And not a star affords its light ; 
How can I then ungrateful be, 
Who have a house to cover me ! 
g2 



83 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

How many poor around me roam, 
Not knowing where to lay their head ; 
Without a friend, without a home, 
Except it be a mud-walled shed ! 
How can I then ungrateful be, 
Who have a house to cover me ! 

How can I then, while thus I live, 

Be discontented with my lot ! 

The Lord does countless mercies give, 

Yet who so often is forgot ? 

Oh may I ever grateful be, 

For all the Lord has given to me ! 

125.* THE THUNDERSTORM. 

When the dark and heavy cloud 
Lifts on high its awful form, 
And above us, pealing loud, 
Rolls the thunder of the storm ; 

Do not fear the lightning's flash — 

God directs it where to fall ; 

Do not fear the thunder's crash, 

For your Saviour rules it all. p. a. t . 

126. THE SHOWER. 

Softly now the showers of rain 
From the clouds descend again ; 
Drop by drop, so very small, 
Hurting nothing as they fall. 

Little flowers now suck them up, 
By the root or in the cup ; 
Richly they supply the need 
Of each tender plant and seed. 

Now the meadow grass will grow, 

It will soon be fit to mow ; 
And the corn's green rising blade 
Will be strong and healthy made. 

84 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

That same God who sends the showers 
On the trees and seeds and flowers, 
Ready is on us to pour 
Gifts from his abundant store. 

Let us, then, on Jesus call, 
To send showers of grace on all ; 
Then his spirit he will give ; 
Dry and barren souls shall live.* 



126.* 



THE RAINBOW. 



127. 



Come, see how fast the weather clears, 

The sun is shining now ; 
And on the last dark cloud appears 

A beauteous-coloured bow. 

'Tis God who makes the storm to cease. 

And sun to shine again ; 
The rainbow is the sign of peace 

Between himself and men. 

This lovely bow he stretches forth, 
And bends from shore to shore, — 

His own fair token to the earth, 
He'll bring a flood no more. 

Just such a bow shines brightly round 
The throne of God in heaven, 

Which shows his mercy has no bound, 
And speaks of sins forgiven. 

"HE IS FAITHFUL THAT PROMISED. 

Oh ! let us praise our God above ; 
His name is Truth, as well as Love ; 
One single word has never failed 
Of all his early promise sealed. 



From "The Child's Book of Poetry.' 






128. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART 

Still does the rainbow's radiant form 
Shine brightly on the passing storm ; 
Still do the seasons roll away, 
And still the night gives place to day ; 
Our bread from him is still secure, 
And water from his hand is sure : 
Yea and amen, in Christ the Lord, 
Is every promise of his word. * 

CHRISTMAS-DAY. 

Little children, can you say 
Why you're glad on Christmas-day ? 
Little children, can you tell 
Why you hear the sweet church bell ? 
Can you tell me who was born 
Early on the Christmas morn ? 

I hope you will at once reply, 

Yes, we are glad and we know why ; 

This day is joyful upon earth 

In honour of our Saviour's birth. 

The angels came from heaven to say, 

That Christ was born on Christmas-day. 

Christ is our Saviour, and we know 
When little children to him go, 
For all the good he gives — to pray 
He will not turn his face away ; 
His word in God's own book we see, 
"Let little children come to me." 

This is the birth-day of our King, 
And we our little offering bring : 
This is our Saviour's holiday, 
And therefore we are glad and gay : 
Will sing, and pray, and read his word. 
And keep the birth-day of our Lord. 

* From " Creation." 
86 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 



129. 



THE CHILDHOOD OF THE LORD 
JESUS CHRIST. 



Dear "children" there was once on earth 

A little Child, that from his birth 

No sinful passion ever knew ; 

Nor said a word that was not true ; 

Nor ever set his heart upon 

What did not to himself belong ; 

Nor cried for things that he had not ; 

Nor wish'd for more than he had got ; 

Nor ever spent his precious day 

In idle talk, or foolish play ; 

No selfish grief he ever felt ; 

No anger in his bosom dwelt ; 

But thoughts of love, and praise, and prayer, 

Like cloudless sunshine, rested there. * 



130. 



JOY INCREASED BY BEING SHARED 
WITH THOSE WE LOVE. 

I need not, dearest children, tell, 
Because I'm sure you know it well, 
How all our pleasures sweeter prove, 
When they are shared with those we love ; 
When some dear friend is by our side, 
To whom we may our thoughts confide ; 
And to whose listening ear reveal 
The gladness that our spirits feel. 
How often on some lovely day, 
Your heart has seemed to spring away, 
As if 'twould borrow wings to fly, 
And join the birds that warbled nigh ; 
The sky has never seemed to you 
To wear so pure, so soft a blue ; 
So bright the sun has never been ; 
The fields were never half so green ; 

* From "The Great Exemplar." 

-7 



EAST VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

All nature seemed in beauty clad, 

As if attired to make you glad ; 

Yet 'twas not sky, nor sun, nor flower, 

That made so bright the passing hour ; 

'Twas some kind voice, or smile as kind, 

That poured such gladness o'er your mind. 

And bade your lively feelings draw 

Delight from everything you saw. 

But if no loved mamma were near 

The story of your joy to hear ; 

No dear papa beside you walked, 

And listened while his darling talked ; 

No young companion with you played, 

Or through the groves and meadows strayed ; 

No friend beheld your harmless glee, 

With sweet affection's sympathy ; — 

As fair might be the summer day, 

And nature dressed in hues as gay, 

Yet, with a sigh your lips would own, 

'Twas very sad to be alone. * 



131. 



BROTHERLY LOVE. 

" Little children, love each other," 
'Tis the blessed Saviour's rule ; 

Every little one is brother 
To his play-fellows at school. 

We're all children of one Father, 
That great God who reigns above; 

Shall we quarrell ? No, much rather 
Would we dwell like him in love. 

He has placed us here together, 
That we may be good and kind ; 

He is ever watching whether 
We are one in heart and mind. 



* From "Creation." 
88 



PART II.] EASY TERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Who is stronger than the other ? 

Let him be the weak one's friend ; 
Who's more playthings than his brother ? 

He should like to give or lend. 

All they have they share with others, 
With kind looks and gentle words ; 

Thus they live like happy brothers, 
And are known to be the Lord's 



131/ 



132. 



BROTHERS AND SISTERS. 

Brothers and sisters are a gift 

Of mercy from the skies ; 
Oh may I always think of this 

Whene'er they meet my eyes : 
Be tender, good and kind, 

And love them in my heart, 
Lest I should sigh with better grief 

When we are called to part. 

Mrs. Sigourney. 

MY MOTHER. 

I must not tease my mother, 

For she is very kind ; 
And every thing she says to me, 

I must directly mind. 

For when I was a baby, 

And could not speak or walk, 
She let me in her bosom sleep, 

And taught me how to talk. 

I must not tease my mother ; 

And when she likes to read, 
Or has the headache, I will step 

Quite silently indeed. 

I will not choose a noisy play, 

Nor trifling troubles tell ; 
But sit down quiet by her side, 

And try to make her well. 

89 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

I must not tease my mother ; 

I've heard my father say, 
When I was in my cradle sick, 

She nursed me night and day. 

She lays me in my little bed, 

She gives me clothes and food, 
And I have nothing else to pay 

But trying to be good. 

I must not tease my mother ; 

She loves me all the day, 
And she has patience with my faults, 

And teaches me to pray. 

How much Til strive to please her, 

She every day shall see ; 
For should she go away and die, 

What would become of me ? 

Mrs. Sigourney. 



132.' 



MY MOTHER. 



Who fed me from her gentle breast, 
And hushed me in her arms to rest, 
And on my cheek sweet kisses pressed ? 

My mother. 

When sleep forsook my open eye, 
Who was it sung sweet hushaby, 
And rocked me that I should not cry ? 

My mother. 

Who sat and watched my infant head, 
When sleeping on my cradle bed, 
And tears of sweet affection shed ? 

My mother. 

When pain and sickness made me cry, 
Who gazed upon my heavy eye, 
And wept for fear that I should die ? 

My mother. 
90 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Who ran to help me when I fell, 
And would some pretty story tell, 
Or kiss the place to make it well ? 

My mother. 
Who taught my infant lips to pray, 
And love God's holy book and day, 
And walk in wisdom's pleasant way ? 

My mother. 
And can I ever cease to be 
Affectionate and kind to thee, 
Who wast so very kind to me ? 

My mother. 
Ah no ! the thought I cannot bear ; 
And if God please my life to spare, 
I hope I shall reward thy care, 

My mother. 
When thou art feeble, old, and grey, 
My healthy arm shall be thy stay, 
And I will soothe thy pains away, 

My mother. 
And when I see thee hang thy head, 
'Twill be my turn to watch thy bed, 
And tears of sweet affection shed, 

My mother. * 

THE BABY. 

Safe, sleeping on its mother's breast, 

The smiling babe appears, 
Now sweetly sinking into rest, 

Now washed in sudden tears. 
Hush, hush, my little baby dear, 
There's nobody to hurt you here. 

Without a mother's tender care 

The little thing must die ; 
Its pretty hands too feeble are, 

One service to supply ; 
And not a tittle does it know 
What kind of world 'tis come into. 
* "Original Poems." 

91 



133. 



EAST VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

The lamb sports gaily on the grass 

When scarcely born a day ; 
The foal, beside its mother ass, 

Trots frolicsome away ; 
And not a creature, tame or wild, 
Is half so helpless as a child. 

Full many a summer's sun must glow, 

And lighten up the skies, 
Before its tender limbs can grow 

To anything of size ; 
And all the while the mother's eye 
Must every little want supply. 

Then surely when each little limb 

Shall grow to healthy size, 
And youth and manhood strengthen him 

For toil and enterprize, 
His mother's kindness is a debt 
He never, never can forget.* 



134. 



LITTLE MARY. 



Before the bright sun rises over the hill, 
In the cornfields poor Mary is seen, 

Impatient her little blue apron to fill 

With the few scattered ears she can glean. 

She never looks off, nor goes out of her place, 

To play, or to idle, and chat, 
Except now and then just to wipe her warm face, 

And to fan herself with her straw hat. 

" Why don't you leave off, as the others have done, 
And sit with them under the tree ? 

I fear you will faint in the beams of the sun, 
How tired and warm you must be !" 

* " Original Poems." 
92 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

" Oh no ! my clear mother lies sick in her bed, 

Too feeble to spin or to knit ; 
My poor little brothers are crying for bread, 

And we hardly can give them a bit. 

" Then conld I be idle, or merry, or play, 
While they are so hungry and ill ? 

Ah no ! I had rather work hard all the day, 
My little blue apron to fill."* 

135. THE TIDY GIRL. 

Who is it each day in the week may be seen- 
With her hair short and smooth, and her hands ami 

face clean ; 
In a stout cotton gown of dark and light blue. 
Though old, so well mended, you'd take it for new ; 
Her handkerchief tidily pinned o'er her neck ; 
With a neat little cap, and an apron of check ; 
No great flouncing border, no ragged old lace, 
But a hem, neatly plaited, sits close round her face ; 
Her shoes and her stockings, all sound and all clean, 
She's never fine outside and dirty within. 
Go, visit her cottage, though humble and poor, 
'Tis so neat and so clean, you might eat off the floor ; 
No rubbish, no cobwebs, no dirt could be found. 
Though you hunted each corner, and searched all 

around. 
Who sweeps it so nicely, who makes all the bread, 
Who tends her sick mother, and works by her bed ? 
'Tis the neat, tidy girl, she needs no other name, 
Abroad, or at home, she is always the same. 



135. 



AGAINST PRIDE IN CLOTHES. 



How proud we are, how fond to shew 
Our clothes, and call them rich and new : 
When the poor sheep and silkworms wore 
That very clothing long before ! 

• " Original Poems." 

93 



EASr VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

The tulip and the butterfly 

Appear in gayer coats than I : 

Let me be dressed fine as I will, 

Flies, worms and flowers exceed me still. 

Then will I set my heart to find 
Inward adornings of the mind ; 
Knowledge and virtue, truth and grace, 
These are the robes of richest dress. 

No more shall worms with me compare, 
This is the raiment angels wear ; 
The Son of God, when here below, 
Put on this blest apparel too. 

It never fades, it ne'er grows old ; 
Nor fears the rain, nor moth, nor mould ; 
It takes no spot, but still refines ; 
The more 'tis worn, the more it shines. 

136. ANNIE AND HER GRANDMOTHER; OR 
THE LITTLE MARKET GIRL. 

Beside the lowly cottage gate, 

See little Ajinie's pony wait, 

While flowers and fruit, arranged with care, 

Perfume the early morning air ; 

And each full pannier at his side 

Looks gay with all the garden's pride. 

Well pleased she views her fragrant store, 

And guides her pony from the door, 

Across the heath, and down the hill, 

And near the foaming water mill ; 

Then o'er the little bridge of stone, 

With moss and ivy overgrown, 

They pass the church and school-house neat, 

And reach the busy market street. 

Amidst the crowd, with modest grace, 

See Annie seeks her usual place, 

Close to the friendly sheltering side 

Of a kind neighbour to abide — 

94 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

One who lives near them on the wild, 

And loves to help the gentle child. 

Though silent now amidst the scene, 

Had you upon the journey been, 

Young Annie's voice you might have heard 

Sweet as the song of early bird. — 

" Who'll buy my currants, red and white, 

In shining clusters clear and bright ; 

My strawberries, too, so fine and good, 

Fresh gathered in the hawthorn wood ; 

Ripe bunches from the cherry trees, 

Sweet honey made by the busy bees ? 

Here's mignonette to scent the air, 

And roses red, and lilies fair, 

Forget-me-not of azure blue, 

And heart's-ease of each varied hue ; 

Here's jessamine with its starry eye, 

And fragrant herbs for you to dry. 

My grandmother is old and poor, 

She lives beside the upland moor ; 

She's little else to help her now, 

But the plants which in her garden grow ; 

And no one lives with her but me, 

And I'm but a little girl you see ; 

She's kinder to me than tongue can tell, 

And little Annie loves her well ; 

She teaches me to read and pray, 

And when an orphan babe I lay, 

She took me home with her to live, 

And gave me all she had to give. 

Oh ! could I now but helpful be 

To her who was so kind to me !" 

And here a tear drops on the cheek, 

Speaks plainer far than words can speak, 

How dearly Annie longs to prove 

Her grateful zeal and filial love. 

Dear children, think what debts you owe, 

How best affection you can show. 

M. * * M. 

9o 



136.* 



EASY TERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

ANNIE; OR, THE LITTLE SUNDAY 
SCHOLAR. 

On Sunday it is Annie's rule 
To hasten to the Sabbath-school, 
That she the Bible well may know, 
And in the paths of wisdom grow ; 
With young and dear companions raise, 
Sweet songs of gratitude and praise, 
And learn to love His blessed name 
Who to this world of sorrow came, 
And dwelt with sinful man below, 
To save us both from sin and woe. 
And what though summer skies are clear, 
And woods and pleasant fields are near, 
(In which on any other day 
Dear little Annie loves to play, 
To gather cresses in the brook, 
Or on the bank for straAvberries look), — 
What though the birds so gaily sing, 
And flowers beneath her footsteps spring, 
They cannot tempt her now to stray 
Or linger trifling on her way ; 
But rather prompt within her mind 
The thought, "How very good and kind 
Is God, who makes each pretty thing, 
The flowers that bloom, the birds that sing ! " 
Then Annie lifts her grateful eyes 
To Him who dwells above the skies, 
And hymns and texts the way beguile, 
Until she meets her teacher's smile. 
And now, dear children, could I tell 
How Annie says her lesson well, 
And how with pleased, yet serious look, 
She listens to God's holy book ; 
And how her answers, meek and wise, 
Prove that she does that volume prize, 
Making her teacher's heart o'erflow, 
And with the purest pleasure glow ; 
96 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Then could I tell you how, at night. 
'Tis little Annie's great delight 
To read aloud the sacred page, 
Cheering her feeble parent's age, 
While on her youthful duteous head, 
Those trembling hands are fondly spread. 
Oh ! could you see the happy pair, 
And listen to their evening prayer, 
Then see them calmly sink to rest, 
With faith and love so richly blest ; 
Oh, would you not, like Annie, try 
To seek a blessing from on high ; 
Like her, your parent's joy to prove ; 
Like her, your Saviour's name to love ; 
Like her, on his own truth to feed ; 
Like her, to practise what you read ? 



M**M. 



137. 



COMPASSION. 



Around the fire, one wintry night, 

The farmer's rosy children sat, 

The faggot lent its blazing light, 

And jokes went round, and harmless chat: 

When, hark ! a gentle hand they hear 
Low tapping at the bolted door, 
And thus, to gain their willing ear, 
A feeble voice was heard implore : 

"Cold blows the blast across the moor, 
The sleet drives hissing in the wind ; 
Yon toilsome mountain lies before, 
A dreary, treeless waste behind. 

" My eyes are weak and dim with age. 
No road, no path can I descry ; 
And these poor rags ill stand the rage. 
Of such a keen inclement sky. 

n 9 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

" So faint I am, these tottering feet 
No more my palsied frame can bear. 
My freezing heart forgets to beat, 
And drifting snows my tomb prepare : 

" Open your hospitable door, 
And shield me from the biting blast ; 
Cold, cold it blows across the moor, 
The weary moor that I have passed." 

With hasty steps the farmer ran, 
And close beside the fire they place 
The poor half-frozen beggar-man, 
With shaking limbs and pale-blue face. 

The little children flocking came, 
And chafed his frozen hands in theirs ; 
And busily the good old dame 
A comfortable mess prepares. 

Their kindness cheered his drooping soul, 
And slowly down his wrinkled cheek 
The big round tear was seen to roll, 
And told the thanks he could not speak. 

The children then began to sigh, 
And all their merry chat was o'er ; 
And yet they felt, they knew not why, 
More glad than they had done before. 



THE APPLE-TREE. 



138. 

Old John had an apple-tree, healthy and green, 
Which bore the best codlings that ever were seen, 

So juicy, so mellow, and red; 
And when they were ripe, as old Johnny was poor, 
He sold them to children that passed by his door, 

To buy him a morsel of bread. 

Little Dick, his next neighbour, one often might see 
With longing eye viewing Ibis nice apple-tree, 

And wishing a codling might fall : 

98 



TART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

One day as he stood in the heat of the sun, 
He began thinging whether he might not take one. 
And then he looked over the wall. 

And as he again cast his eye on the tree, 

He said to himself, " how nice they would be, 

So cool and refreshing to-day ! 
The tree is so full, and I'd only take one. 
And old John won't see, for he is not at home, 

And nobody is in the way." 

But stop, little boy, take your hand from the bough, 
Remember, though John cannot see you just now, 

And no one to chide you is nigh — 
There is One, who by night, just as well as by day, 
Can see all you do, and can hear all you say, 

From his glorious throne in the sky. 

Oh then, little boy, come away from the tree, 
Content, hot, or weary, or thirsty to be, 

Or anything rather than steal ; 
For the great God, who even in darkness can look, 
Writes down every crime we commit in his book, 

However we think to conceal. * 

139. THE OLD BEGGAR MAN. 

I see an old man sitting there, 
His withered limbs are almost bare, 
And very hoary is his hair. 

Old man, why are you sitting so ? 
For very cold the wind doth blow ; 
Why don't you to your cottage go ? 

Ah, master, in the world so wide, 
I have no home wherein to hide, 
No comfortable fire -side. 

When I, like you, was young and gay, 
I'll tell you what I used to say, 
That I would nothing do but play- 

* " Original Poems." 

ii 2 99 



EAST VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

And so, instead of being taught 
Some useful lesson, as I ought, 
To play about was all I sought. 

And now that I am old and grey, 

I wander on my lonely way, 

And beg my bread from day to day. 

And oft I shake my hoary head, 
And many a bitter tear I shed, 
To think the useless life I've led. * 



139.* 



THE SLUGGARD. 



God did not make the lovely day 
That we might waste its hours away, 
In needless slumbering on our bed, 
Till morning's precious hours were fled. 
See how the dreamy sluggard lies 
Upon his couch, and hates to rise ; 
He folds his hands upon his breast, 
And begs a little longer rest : 
The sunbeams meet his eyes in vain ; 
He turns away, and sleeps again. 
I passed beside a field, and found 
Its fence was broken to the ground ; 
With weeds and thorns 'twas overgrown ; 
The sluggard called that field his own. f 

I4(h THE CONTENTED BLIND BOY. 

Oh say, what is that thing called light, 

Which I must ne'er enjoy ? 
What are the blessings of the sight ? 

Oh tell your poor blind boy. 

You talk of wondrous things you see, 
You say the sun shines bright ; 

I feel him warm, but how can he 
Or make it day or night ? 

* "Nursery Rbvmes." f From "Creation." 

100 



TART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

My day or night myself I make, 
Whene'er I sleep or play : 

And could I always keep awake, 
With me 'twere always day. 

With heavy sighs I often hear 
You mourn my hapless woe ; 

But sure with patience I can bear 
A loss I ne'er can know. 

Then let not what I cannot have 
My cheer of mind destroy ; 

I know that He who died to save 
Can bless a poor blind boy. 

When I can hear of all the love 
My Saviour bears to me, 

I'm happy, for I look above, 
Although I cannot see. 



140. 



* 



THE LITTLE CRIPPLE. 

I'm a helpless crippled child, 
Gentle Christians, pity me ; 
Once in rosy health I smiled, 
Blithe and gay as you may be ; 
And upon the village green, 
First in every sport was seen. 

Now, alas ! I am weak and low, 
Cannot either work or play ; 
Tottering on my crutches slow, 
Drag along my weary way ; 
Now no longer dance and sing 
Gaily in the merry ring. 

Many sleepless nights I live, 
Turning on my weary bed ; 
Softest pillows cannot give 
Slumber to my aching head ; 
It is pain that makes it fly 
From my heavy, wakeful eye. 

101 



141. 



EAST VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

But, oh ! let me not complain, 
Still sweet comfort shines for me ; 
'Tis enough to soothe my pain, 
When I think, O Lord ! of thee ; 
All thy tender love and care, 
And kind answers to my prayer. 

From my chamber-window high, 
Lifted to my easy chair, 
I the village green can spy : 
Once I used to frolic there. 
All those joys indeed are past, 
But my better pleasures last. 

Gentle Christian, passing by, 
Stop awhile and comfort me, 
Tell me of the joys on high, 
Of the God I long to see ; 
And for you I'll breathe a prayer, 
Leaning in my easy chair. * 

THE FIRST GRIEF. 



" Oh call my brother back to me ! 

I cannot play alone ; 
The summer comes with flower and bee ; 

Where is my brother gone ? 

" The butterfly is glancing bright, 

Across the sunbeam's track ; 
I care not now to chase its flight — 

Oh call my brother back ! 

" The flowers run wild ; the flowers we sowed 

Around our garden tree ; 
Our vine is drooping with its load — 

Oh call him back to me !" 

"He would not hear my voice, dear child ! 

He may not come to thee ; 
The face that once like spring-time smiled, 
On earth no more thou'lt see. 
♦ "Original Poems.'* 
102 



TART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

" A rose's brief, bright life of joy, 

Such unto him was given ! — 
Go ! thou must play alone, my boy ! 

Thy brother is in heaven." 

" And has he left the birds and flowers ? 

And must I call in vain ? 
And through the long, long summer hours. 

Will he not come again ? 

" And by the brook, and in the glade, 

Are all our wanderings o'er ? 
Oh, while my brother with me played, 

Would I had loved him more !" 

MRS. HEMANS. 



142. 



THE LITTLE WANDERING JEW. 



Far, far from Zion, far from God, 
And suffering still the chastening rod, 
Hopeless and homeless meets your view 
The little weary wandering Jew ! 

No Father's name, no worship sweet, 
No Saviour's love, no mercy-seat, 
( Though by his nation brought to you) 
Now bless the little weary Jew. 

O Christian Gentiles ! can you hear 
That Gospel, to your souls so dear, 
And yet no sympathy from you 
Await the little wandering Jew ? — 

Or canst thou view the eastern star 
Which brought the wise men from afar, 
And whilst it shines so bright on you, 
Forget the darkness of the Jew ? 

Or canst thou hear thy God's address — 
" Who blesseth thee, I'll ever bless 
And yet refuse the tribute due, 

ach and cheer the little Jew ? 

103 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

143. THE HEATHEN'S CRY FOR HELP. 

Acts xvi. 9. 

While Paul was sunk in slumber. 

A stranger met his eye ; 
"To Macedon come over 

And help us," was his cry. 

With God the Holy Spirit, 

And Jesus for his stay, 
He listened to the vision, 
^ And thither bent his way. 

That cry even now is sounding 

From near and distant land ; 
And shall we all unheeding, 

Withhold the helping hand ; 

No ! on where duty calls us, 

'Tis little we can do, 
Yet let us use our efforts, 

And to our God be true. 

Our pennies and our farthings 

We may give to the Lord, 
And pray for those who labour 

To spread abroad His word. 

M. A. STODART. 



144. 



A LESSON FOR CHILDREN. 



A (iRAiN of corn an infant's hand 

May sow upon an inch of land, 
Whence twenty stalks may rise and yield 

Enough to crop a little field. 

The harvest of that field may then 

Be multiplied by ten limes ten, 
Which, sown thrice more, would furnish bread 

Wherewith an army might be fed. 
104 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

A penny is a little thing, 

Which e'en a poor man's child may fling 
Into the treasury of heaven, 

And make it worth as much as seven. 

As seven ! — nay, worth its weight in gold, 
And that increased a millionfold ; 

For, mark — a penny tract, if well 
Applied, may save a soul from hell. 

That soul could scarce be saved alone, 
Its bliss, I trust, it would make known ; 

"Come," it would say, "and you shall see 
What great things God has done for me." 

Hundreds the joyful sound might hear, 
Hear with the heart as well as ear ; 

And these to hundreds more proclaim 
Salvation through the only Name. 

That only Name, above, below, 

Let Jews, and Turks, and Pagans know, 

That every tongue and tribe may call 
On Jesus Christ as Lord of all. 

MONTGOMERY. 



145. 



LITTLE CHARLOTTE AND MARY. 

"A penny I have, 

'Tis all my own," 
Little Charlotte exclaimed 

In lively tone. 
"I cannot do much 

With a penny, I fear, 
But I'll buy myself something 

To eat or to wear." 

"A penny I have," 

Little Mary said, 
And she thoughtfully raised 

Her hand to her head. 

105 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

"'Both missions and schools 

Want money, I know, 
But I fear that 'tis little 

A penny can do." 

So Charlotte ran off 

And some apples she bought, 
While Mary her mite 

To the mission-box brought ; 
And which of them, think you, 

More cheerfully smiled ? 
And which of the two 

Was the happier child ? 

M. A. STODART. 



146 



LITTLE MARY AND THE STRAW 
BONNET. 

{Fro?n the French of Malun.) 
A good and gentle child, 

Named little Mary Brown, 
Lived in a cottage on the road 

Not very far from town. 

She loved to go to school, 
And in her hours of leisure, 

Reading the Lord's most holy word 
Was her chief joy and pleasure. 

One morning her mamma, 

Who brought her up with care, 

When kneeling near her humbly said, 
"O Father, hear my prayer. 

"Grant that my little girl 
May choose the better part, 

And early let thy heavenly grace 
Put zeal into her heart. 

"0 teach her, blessed Lord, 

To follow day by day, 
The faithful Shepherd who now calls 
Young children to his way, 
106 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

"A lamb of thine own flock, 

By her thy will be done, 
And ever may she love to spread 

The kingdom of Thy Son." 

" Oh ! tell me, mother dear/' 

Cried Mary, full of love, 
" What can a little helpless child 

Do for the Lord above ?" 

"Mary," her mother said, 

<l The very meanest thing 
Will be, if offered up aright, 

A worthy offering. 

"There only wants the will 

To labour for the Lord, 
Who every little help accepts 

To circulate His word. 

"And if you would but try 
These worthless straws to plat, 

You soon might learn to make and sell 
A bonnet or a hat. 

"And then the little sums 

Of money you would get, 
You might with humble, grateful zeal 

To Jesus dedicate. 

"And so the Bible sent 

To distant heathen lands, 
Would tell men of God's wondrous love. 

And teach them his commands." 

With pleasure Mary heard 

The good that she might do, 
And earnestly resolved to try 
This labour to pursue. 

107 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

So scarce a week had passed 

Ere little Mary knew 
To choose the best and finest straws, 

And plat and sew them too. 

Her little fingers worked 

With industry and care, 
And to her pious task she gave 

Each moment she could spare. 

Soon she had done enough 

For something to be made, 
And then she to her mother came 

And, kneeling by her, said : 

" Oh ! may my dear mamma, 

Who prays so much for me, 
Henceforth with joyful heart, Lord, 

Daily delight in Thee. 

"I humbly offer now 

This bonnet that I've made, 
And oh ! how thankful shall I be 

If by my humble aid, 

"Thy book, more widely spread, 

To some poor sinner given, 
May teach him truly to repent, 

And lead him up to heaven." 

THE REV. J. HEALE. 



147. 



MOTHERS EVENING ADDRESS TO A 
LITTLE CHILD. 



My little one, my little one, 
Night is come and day is gone, 
It is time to lay your head 
On your comfortable bed, 
But first, to God your Father pray, 
And thank him for his care to-day. 
108 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

Now, my darling, lay your head 
On your soft and peaceful bed ; 
And as quietly you lie, 
Recollect that Christ is nigh, 
And your soul may safely rest 
On his kind and tender breast. 

Let your latest thoughts be given 
To the Lord of earth and heaven, 
And when sleep is gone away, 
Lift your heart to him and pray ; 
Sleeping, waking, thus you'll prove 
Jesu's care, and Jesu's love. 

M. A. STODART. 

148. THE LITTLE BOY'S EVENING 
THOUGHTS ABOUT HIMSELF. 

Let me think — have I done one right action to-day. 

One thing that was gentle and good ? 
Have I tried to be loving and kind in my play, 

And in school to behave as I should ? 

When my dear little sister was fretful with pain, 

Did I do all I could to amuse ? 
When she threw down my toys, did I bring them 
again, 

And lend her my playthings to use ? 

When my dear father told me to leave off my play. 

And help him to work in the field, 
Did I cheerfully try to give up my own way, 

And ready obedience to yield ? 

When repeating my hymn, did I think of the Lord, 

My heavenly Father above, 
Did I try to be thankful while hearing that word 

Which tells of his wonderful love ? 
Oh, I fear I am wilful, and selfish and vain ; 

I am sorry to think of the past ; 
Yet as God is so good I will still try again, 

He will help me to please him at last. M • * M, 

109 



149. 



EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 



AGAINST INTEMPERANCE. 



I saw a little girl 

With half uncovered form, 
And wondered why she wandered thus 

Amid the winter storm ; 
They said her mother drank 

What took her sense away, 
And so she let her children go 

Hungry and cold all day. 

I saw them lead a man 

To prison for his crime, 
Where solitude and punishment 

And toil divide the time ; 
And as they forced him through the gate 

Unwillingly along, 
They told me 'twas intemperance 

That made him do the wrong. 

I saw a woman weep 

As if her heart would break ; 
They said her husband drank too much 

Of what he should not take. 
I saw an unfrequented mound, 

Where weeds and brambles wave ; 
They said no tear had fallen there — 

It was a drunkard's grave ! 

They said these were not all 

The risks the intemperate run, 
For then 1 was danger lest the soul 

Be evermore undone. 
Water is very pure and sweet, 

And beautiful to see ; 
And since it cannot do us harm, 

It is the drink for me.* 

* From" The Child's Wreath.' 5 
110 



TART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 



150. 



THE BURNT CHILD.* 



A little girl, named Annie Gray, 
Was going home from school one day, 
And, as the day was rather warm, 
Had hung her cloak upon her arm, 
The cloak was woollen — nice and thick ; 
But suddenly Ann's heart beat quick, 
As breathless ran past Sally Dyer, 
Crying out, " Fire ! oh ! John's on fire P 
Now tell me what, in such a case, 
Would you have done in Annie's place ? 
Would you have run in search of aid, 
And thus your useful help delayed ? 
Ann to the cottage hastened on, 
Where dwelt poor Mary Williamson ; 
And then the sight that met her view 
Proved her worst fears were all too true. 
A moving column of thick flame, 
Which hither, thither, w r ent and came, 
Was all that could be seen of John, 
The widowed mother's youngest son. 
His little sisters, trembling there, 
With screams terrific rent the air. 
But on the burning boy, Ann flung 
The cloak that on her arm was hung, 
And so well wrapped him about, 
That soon the fire was quite put out ; 
And Johnny's life was saved that day 
By the good sense of Annie Gray. 

Remember this, and do the same — 

Wrap woollen round your clothes in flame- 

Vkkmi i 

* It is vory desirable for Teachers to n waken the attention 
of children to the danger of fire, and to the means of extin- 
guishing ir. 

Ill 



151. 



152 



EAST VERSE FOR INFANTS. [PART II. 

ENGLAND AND HER QUEEN. 

Hurrah ! hurrah for England ! 

Her woods and valleys green ; 
Hurrah for good Old England ! 

Hurrah for England's queen ! 

Strong ships be on her waters, 
Firm friends upon her shores, 

Peace, peace within her borders, 
And plenty in her stores. 

Right joyously we're singing, 

We're glad to make it known 
That we love the land we live in, 

And our queen upon her throne. 

Then hurrah for merry England, 

And may we still be seen 
True to our own dear country, 

And loyal to our queen ! 

M. A. STODART. 



THE INFANT SCHOLAR'S ADDRESS 

TO THE QUEEN. 
Victoria ! Victoria ! 

We hail thy gentle rule ; 
Victoria, the patroness 

Of every infant school. 
The kings of old their people led 

To battles fierce and wild, 
'Tis nobler far, with fostering care, 

To train each little child. 

When spring's return with primroses 

And violets fills the green, 
We'll weave the pretty flowers to make 

A chaplet for our queen. 
When summer brings the lovely rose 

Again to deck the bowers, 
We'll think of thee when we behold 

That fairest queen of flowers. 
112 



PART II.] EASY VERSE FOR INFANTS. 

In autumn, when the yellow crops 

Beneath the sickle bend, 
We'll pray that peace and plenty may 

Victoria's reign attend. 
And when the winter's wind and snow 

Beat cold against the door, 
We'll think of her whose laws protect 

The fireside of the poor. 

We little children scarce can tell 

What others mean by care ; 
But we are told 'tis sorely felt 

By those a crown who wear. 
Then, when thy heart with sorrow swells, 

Whate'er thy troubles be ; 
Cast all thy care on Him who wore 

A thorny crown for thee. 

May God our sovereign lady grant 

Long o'er this land to rule ; 
And children's children bless her name 

In this our infant school. 
If here we ne'er should see thy face. 

May we hereafter meet, 
Where thou wilt meekly cast thy crown 

At our Redeemer's feet. 

MRS.HERSCHELL. 



END OF PART II. 



113 



PART THIRD. 

PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY 
IN VERSE. 



153. 



CAIN AND ABEL. 



" He that loveth not his brother abideth in death. "- 
1 John iii. 14. 

In happy boyhood they had played 

Beside their parents' knee, 
Had rambled in the greenwood shade, 

And climbed the forest tree. 
The earth before them opened wide, 

Fresh clad in living green ; 
They loved to wander side by side, 

Rejoicing in the scene. 

How great the change ! to manhood grown, 

What sight strikes on the eye ? 
One brother gives a dying moan — 

First of his race to die. 
The murderer stands in silent fear, 

His eye bent on the ground ; 
"Where is thy brother?" meets his ear ; 

He trembles at the sound. 

Ah ! lit lie did their parents dream, 

In childhood's merry play, 
When all seemed bright as morning beam. 

One should the other slay. 
114 



i'AUT III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

Deeply they mourn for Abel slain, 

The gentle and the good ; 
But more they mourn for envious Cain, 

Stained with his brother's blood. 

And oh ! in childhood's thoughtless hour, 

When all seems bright and blest, 
Little we know with what strange power 

Evil may rend the breast ; 
Little we know what passions lie 

Deep in our treacherous soul ; 
But, Lord ! to Thee we lift our cry, 

Those passions to control.* 

M. A. STODART. 

154. THE FLOOD. 

" Come thou and all thy house into the ark." — Gen. vii. 1. 

When the overwhelming flood 

Came upon a world of sin, 
Noah made an ark of wood, 

God was pleased to shut him in. 

As the swelling waters flowed, 

Over valley, tree, and hill, 
Then the ark in safety rode ; 

High it rose and higher still. 

God to Noah granted grace, 

When all other people died ; 
He had sought his Maker's face, 

None had called on God beside. 

Only love and fear the Lord, 

Lift your heart to him in prayer, 

Rest upon your Saviour's word, 
God will for his children care. 

All who are, like Noah, his, 

God will safe to glory raise, 
There to dwell where Jesus is, 

See his face and sing his praise. 

d, a. r. 

* From u Scriptural Poems for Children." 

1 2 1 lo 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

155. HAGAR AND ISHMAEL. 

" And God heard the voice of the lad." — Gen xxi. 17. 

Two travellers were on their way, 

A mother and her child ; 
The path they followed seemed to lay 

All through a desert wild. 

That child, when in his happy home, 

Had spoken words of scorn ; 
And therefore he was sent to roam, 

A wanderer forlorn. 

The water was all spent and gone — 
No spring, no stream at hand, 

Could they, as sad they travelled on, 
See in the barren sand. 

At length the mother looked around, 
And there beneath the shade 

Of some few shrubs, upon the ground 
Her little son she laid. 

And there she wept; and turned aside, 
And raised her voice on high ; 

And loudly in her grief she cried, 
"Let me not see him die." 

She had a Friend who knew her grief, 

Her trouble, and her fears ; 
A Friend that brought her quick relief, 

And wiped away her tears. 

That gracious Friend was God, who heard 

The child, in trouble, cry ; 
And by his Angel Bent a word, 

To say he should not die. 

The angel, calling from the skies, 

Said, "llagar, do not fear ;" 
And then God opened Hagar's eyes, 

To see a fountain near, 
116 



PART III.] TORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY, 

Some water then with joy she drew, 

And to her child she ran ; 
He drank, revived, and lived, and grew 

To be a mighty man. 

O let us bless the God of grace, 
Who hears us when we pray, 

And from the child who seeks his face, 
Will never turn away. 

D. A. T 



156. 



THE GOD OF ABRAHAM. 



u God will provide himself a lamb for a burnt offering." 
— Gen. xxii. 8. 

When Abraham, at God's command, 
Took fire, and wood, and knife in hand, 

To slay his only son ; 
Though painful thoughts his soul oppressed. 
One thought prevailed above the rest ; 

It was, "Thy will be done." 

He loved his son — but more he loved 
The Lord, who thus his servant proved ; 

And so by duty led, 
He went, believing God, who gave 
To him his son, could also save, 

And raise him from the dead. 

He stretched his hand — he raised the knife 
To take away his Isaac's life ; 

When lo ! an angel's voice — 
"Lay not thine hand upon the lad ;" 
Well might the father's heart be glad, 

Well might his soul rejoice ! 

Happy are they who humbly trust 
In God — the holy and the j ust, 

Whose eyes can see the heart ; 
Who though he may his people try, 
Will yet be found for ever nigh, 

His succour to impart. 

117 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

Isaac was spared — but Christ has died — 
The Lamb God did himself provide ; 

On whom our sins were laid. 
His only Son he did not spare, 
When on the cross he hung, and there 

Our mighty debt he paid. 

Oh ! may we love and trust the Lord ! 
And do his will, and keep his word ; 

And we shall surely find 
The God of Abraham our friend, 
Who is, and will be to the end, 

A friend for ever kind. 

D. a. i 

157. THE INFANT MOSES. 

Exodus xi. 1 — 10. 

God's people once in Egypt were, 

A strange and foreign land ; 
By Pharaoh kept in bondage there 

And ruled with cruel hand. 

He ordered that their little ones, 

Wherever they were found, 
Their new-born babes, their infant sons. 

Should every one be drowned. 

The wife of Amram sought a way 

Her little child to save ; 
For oh ! what mother could obey 

The order Pharaoh gave ? 

Three months she hid her darling boy, 

Those mon t lis were quickly past ; 
And well she knew her treasured joy 

She must give up at last. 

She also knew thai God was near. 

And he could give her aid; 
And so, with mingled hope and fear. 
A little ark she made — 
118 



TAKI III.] TORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

An ark of bulrushes, in which 

Her babe might softly lie ; 
And pitched it in and out with pitch. 

To keep it safe and dry. 

Then where the flags and rushes grew 

Did she in faith repair, 
And in its bed, so strange and new. 

She laid her infant there. 

But who should on that very day 

Come to the river side, 
And with her maidens bend her way, 

Just when the ark she spied ? 

King Pharaoh's daughter left her home 
To seek the cooling wave ; — 

She little thought that she had come 
A child from death to save. 

She saw the ark, and wished to know 
What could therein be kept ; 

Her maidens opened it — and lo ! 
An infant ! — and it wept. 

"It is a IJebrew child," she said. 

And pity touched her heart : 
She wished a nurse could there be led, 

To take the mother's part. 

A girl, who had kept out of sight. 

Now ventured near to speak : 
She asked the princess if she might 

A Hebrew woman seek. 

The princess gave her glad assent — 
The girl, half wild with joy, 

Then for her own dear mother went 
To nurse her own dear boy. 

The princess called the child her own. 

And Moses he was named ; 
But God to him his ways made known. 

And God his service claimed. 

119 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

He gave up all to serve the Lord, 

And wise and learned grew ; 
He lived God's wonders to record, 

And work his wonders too. 



157. 



D. A. T. 

MOSES THE FAITHFUL SERVANT 
OF GOD. 

Heb. xi. 24—27. 



God spake to Moses face to face, 
As though he were his friend ; 

And meek was he, and rich in grace, 
And faithful to the end. 

By him the Lord deliverance wrought 

And set his people free ; 
While they who their destruction sought 

All perished in the sea. 

May we, with joy, like him forsake 
This world's vain, sinful ways, 

And Christ our glorious portion make, 
And give to him the praise. 



D. A. T. 



158. MARAH AND ELIM. 

Exodus xv. 22—27. 

Through the burning wastes we've wandered 
Three long days, nor once complained. 

Though both flesh and spirit fainted, 
For a hope our souls sustained. 

Three long days of dreary sunshine, 

Scorching us with dazzling beams ; 
Three long [lights of heavy silence, 

Gladdened by no sound of streams. 
120 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

Hark ! the waters now around us, 

See them sparkling in the sun ; 
Surely now our trial ceaseth ! 

Surely now our goal is won ! 

Lips long parched and sealed in silence 

Press the joyous waves to kiss : 
Eyes, whose tears were dried by anguish, 

Overflow with tears of bliss. 

Gentle girls, themselves untasting, 

Raise to dearer lips the prize, 
Drinking draughts of sweeter pleasure 

In the smile of grateful eyes. 

But a moment, but a moment, 
Let the rapturous dream remain ; 

But a moment — from the nation 
Bursts a sob of wildest pain. 

Children dash the bitter waters 
From them with a moaning cry ; 

Mothers by the mocking fountains 
Lay their thirsting babes to die. 

Hearts that bore the trial bravely 
With this shattered hope have burst, 

For the streams our God has opened — 
Bitter streams — but mock our thirst. 

Was't for this the parted ocean 

Meekly bent our feet to kiss, — 
Fiercely, then, the oppressor whelming ? 

Were our first-born spared for this ? t 

Better to be slaves in Egypt, 

Better to have perished there ; 
Better ne'er a hope have tasted 

Than to sink in this despair. 

Israel ! Israel ! hush thy murmurs, 

Hide thy guilty head in dust ! 
He who is the joy of heaven 

Feeleth grief in thy distrust. 

121 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

Gently through thy wails He whispers, 

" I am he that healeth thee;" 
E'en to-day the stream thou loathest 

Shall thy best refreshment be. 

And to-morrow, but to-morrow, 

He thy sins so often grieve, 
Trains thee for, and storeth for thee, 

Joys thy heart can scarce conceive. 

Streams of waters, gushing, leaping, 
'Neath the shade of many a palm ; 

Let no memory of murmurs 
Mar for thee that blessed calm. 

So thy Marah shall be Elim, 

And thy Elim know no fears ; 
For the fount of deepest gladness 

Lieth near the place of tears.* 



THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 



159. 

" Look unto me, and be ye saved, all ye ends of the earth.' 
— Isaiah xlv. 22. 

Amid the dying and the dead 

The healing type was raised ; 
The dying moved the languid head, 

And lived while there they gazed ; 
The weeping mother looked and smiled ; 
The father led his fainting child ; 
The child its feeble grandsire sought, 
And life to all avIio looked was brought . 

A blessed type — 'tis passed away, 

For types and shadows flee, 
And in the glowing light of day 

The substance we may see : 

* Bv the Author of " Tales and Sketches of Christian Life. 
122 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

To Christ the Lord we raise our eye, 
For he was lifted up on high, 
Life to a dying world to give ; 
And all who look to him shall live. 

Jesus ! the precious truth I know, 

And at thy feet I bend ; 
For where should such a sinner go 

Except to such a friend ? 
My heart is false, my will is wild, 
My every thought with sin defiled ; 
O may I look with simple faith, 
And thus be saved from endless death !* 

M. A. STODAItT. 



160. 



THE PASSAGE OVER JORDAN. 

Joshua iii. 11 — 17. 

The priests just dip their feet 

In Jordan's rapid stream ; 
The waters quick retreat — 

Like walls of silver seem. 
O why do Jordan's waters fly, 
And leave the stony channel dry ? 

The priests in Jordan stay, 

While Israel's mighty host 
With haste pursue their way 

To Canaan's pleasant coast. 
What power restrains the flowing tide, 
While in the deep the priests abide ? 

Full long the white-robed band 

Wait in the depths below ; 
But when they reach the land, 

Once more the waters flow. 
What hand has broke the unseen chain, 
That did the water's force restrain ? 

* From " Scriptural Poeina for Children." 

\2 r c 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

It is the Lord restrains 

The rapid river's tide ; 
It is the Lord unchains 

The walls on either side ; 
It is the Lord who thus would mark 
His love to those who bear his ark. 

O bless us, Lord, like those 

Who in the river stood ; 
A way for us unclose, 

Through this world's dangerous flood ; 
And lead us with thy numerous host 
From lowest depths to heaven's high coast. * 



161. 



RUTH AN EXAMPLE OF FILIAL PIETY- 

"A full reward be given thee of the Lord God of Israel, under 
whose wings thou art come to trust." — Ruth ii. 12. 

"Who is the maiden that doth bend 
Those scattered ears to glean ? " 

Thus Boaz asked, when in his field 
The stranger Ruth was seen. 

From Moab's country she had come 
With her who mourned the dead ; 

She sought in Israel's land a home, 
And worked for daily bread. 

That aged one she would not leave, 

But clave to her in love, - 
And daily she pursues her toil, 

Looking for help above. 

All day the scattered ears she gleans 

Beneath the burning sun, 
And scarcely from her labour rests 

Until her work be done. 

But wherefore had that maiden left 

Her friends and early home ? 
And wherefore to a stranger land 

With old Naomi come ? 

* From "Line Upon Line." 
124 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

It was a ray of Israel's light 

That fell upon her heart ; 
" Thy God shall be my God," she said, 

" And nought but death shall part." 

Her simple faith was not in vain ; 

The Lord is kind and just ; 
A full reward was given by Him 

In whom she came to trust. 

A full reward ! O far beyond 

What fancy can conceive, 
In blessings from her Father's hand 

Did that poor maid receive.* 

M. A. STODART. 

162. SAMUEL. 

"Speak, Lord; for thy servant heareth." — 1 Sam. iii. 9. 

Once in the silence of the night, 
The lamp of God was clear and bright ; 
And there, by holy angels kept, 
Samuel, the child, securely slept. 

An unknown voice the stillness broke ; 
" Samuel ! " it called, and thrice it spoke. 
He rose — he asked, "Whence came the word ? 
"From Eli ?"— No : it was the Lord ! 

Thus early called to serve his God, 
The paths of righteousness he trod ; 
Wisdom and mercy ruled his breast, 
And Israel, taught by him, was blest. 

Speak, Lord, and from our earliest days. 
Incline our hearts to love thy ways ; 
O let thy voice now reach our ear ; 
Speak Lord, and let thy servants hear. 

* "Scriptural Poems For Children." 

125 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

163. DAVID; OR SUCCESS IS FROM THE 
LORD. 
1 Sam. xvii. 45. 

He stands a stripling slight and small 

Against that man of might, 
Yet calm and tranquil is his brow, 

And firm his heart for fight. 
Why should he shrink from giant strength ! 

God's word is sure and tried ; 
Why should he fear what man can do ? 

The Lord is on his side. 

His brothers' scorn he hath withstood, 

The fear of doubting king, 
And there, defenceless and unarmed, 

He stands with stone and sling ; 
Goliath's brow on him is bent 

With bitter scoffing word, 
But David fears not sword nor spear, 

His trust is in the Lord. 

'Tis done ! one stone has laid him low, 

The giant's on the ground, 
And gladdening shouts from Israel's camp 

Re-echo wild around. 
Their youthful champion they praise — 

The faithful and the brave ; 
And David feels with silent joy, 

The Lord is strong to save. 

And I, to war with mighty foes, 

A youthful soldier stand ; ■ 
Jesus, be with me in the fiirlit. 

Stretch forth thy helping hand ; 
The devil, world, and flesh are joined 

In all their might and pride ; 
But wherefore should I turn away 

If thou art on my side ? 

M. A. S TOD ART. 

126 



PART HI.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 



164. 



THE WELL OF BETHLEHEM. 



k ' And David longed and said, Oh, that one would give me 
to drink of the water of the well of Bethlehem, which 
is by the gate.'' — 2 Sam. xxiii. 15. 

Faint on Rephaam's sultry side 

Sat Israel's warrior king ; 
" Oh for one draught," the hero cried, 

" From Bethlehem's cooling spring ! 
From Bethlehem's spring, upon whose brink 
My youthful knee bent down to drink." 



Three gallant men stood nigh, and heard 
The wish their king expressed ; 

Exchanged a glance, but not a word, 
And dashed from 'midst the rest. 

And strong in zeal, with ardour flushed, 

They up the hill to Bethlehem rushed. 



And now the city gate they gain, 

And now in conflict close ; 
Unequal odds ! three dauntless men 

Against unnumbered foes. 
Yet through their ranks they plough their way 
Like galleys through the ocean spray. 



They come again ; — and with them bring 

Nor gems nor golden prey ; 
A single cup from Bethlehem's spring 

Is all they bear away ; 
And through the densest of the train 
Fight back their glorious way again. 

* * * * 

127 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

With deep emotion David took 

From their red hands the cup ; 
Cast on its stains a shuddering look, 

And held it heavenward up. 
" I prize your boon," exclaimed the king, 
" But dare not taste the draught you bring." 
***** 

" To heaven the glorious spoil is due ; 

And His the offering be, 
Whose arm has borne you safely through, 

My brave, but reckless, three !" — 
Then on the earth the cup he poured — 
A free libation to the Lord. 

There is a well in Bethlehem still, 

A fountain, at whose brink 
The weary soul may rest at will, 

The thirsty stoop and drink : 
And, unrepelled by foe or fence, 
Draw living waters freely hence. 

Oh, did we thirst as David, then, 

For this diviner spring ! 
Had we the zeal of David's men 

To please a higher King ! 
What precious draughts we thence might drain, 
What holy triumphs daily gain !* 

lOO. SOLOMON; OR THE WISE CHOICE. 

"And God said, Ask what I shall give thee." — 1 Kings iii.5. 

Now if the Lord should say to me, 
"What gift shall I bestow on thee?" 
Should I like Solomon reply, 
"O give me wisdom from on high !" 

Yet wisdom is the only thing 
That real happiness can bring, 
And restless must my heart remain, 
Until this wisdom I obtain. 

i Extracts from a Poem by the late Rev. II. F. Lyte. 
128 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

It would not make me truly wise, 

To know the stars that fill the skies, 

Or all the fishes in the seas, 

Or beasts and birds, or flowers and trees. 

Wisdom to love the thing that's right. 
Tis this will give my heart delight. 
This wisdom then, O grant to me, 
That I may ever live with thee. * 



166. 



JEHOVAH THE FRIEND OF THE 
WIDOW AND THE ORPHAN 

2 Kings iv. 1 — 7. 



Come, trembling mourners, dry your tears. 
O'er all your sorrows and your fears, 

Let faith in God prevail : 
He is the helpless orphan's friend, 
The widow's cause he will defend, 

His word can never fail. 

A widow to Elisha cries, — 

Tells him from whence her griefs arise, 

And how, in sorrow's hour, 
She trembles for her darling boys — 
Her sole remaining earthly joys — 

No longer in her power. 

For now, their father's debts to pay, 
As bondmen from their home away 

Her sons are forced to go : 
She pleads, "her husband feared the Lord M 
And she, too, hopes upon his word, 

And has no help below. 

The prophet, then, with kindly care 
Leads the poor mourner to declare, 
That, spite of all her toil, 

• From " Line Upon Line.'' 

k 129 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

Nought of her former store remains, 
And her lone dwelling now contains 
But one small pot of oil. 

Yet soon her humble faith shall prove 
That God, to those who trust his love, 

Rich mercies will renew : 
Elisha bids her quickly send, 
And ask her neighbours round to lend 

Spare vessels "not a few." 

Meekly obedient is she found, 
The empty vessels ranged around, 

And closed the open door ; 
While her dear boys each vessel bring, 
As from a never failing spring, 

The oil flows more and more. 

The mother asks another still, 
But not one more remains to fill, 

And now the oil is stayed ; 
But such a rich, abundant store, 
Hath God bestowed upon the poor. 

And such provision made, — 

That all her debts, at once removed, 
The mother and her sons beloved 

May now securely dwell, — 
And spend a grateful life of praise, 
Walking in His most holy ways 

Who doeth all things well. 

Thus round each unprotected head 
The wing of Israel's God is spread ; 

He knows each mourner's grief; 
And still his ear is swift to hear, 
Ready his arm to save from fear, 

And strong to bring relief. 

M * *M. 

130 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURB HISTORY. 



167. 



EL1SHA AND THE SHUN AM MITE. 



11 Women received their dead raised to life again. ' T 
— Heb. xi. 35. 

Lo ! seated on his mother's knees, a little child appears ! 
Why is her face so pale with dread, her eyes so full 

of tears ? 
That very morning bright with health, her blooming 

boy was seen, 
And in the busy harvest field full many an hour has 

been; 
There, by his aged father's side, bounding in sportive 

glee, 
Like a young lamb, as full of play, as happy, and 

as free. 
Say, hast thou marked the flower so fair, that scent > 

the early dawn ? 
The mower's scythe but sweeps the field — we look. 

and it is gone ! 
So suddenly a dart of pain ends all this infant's play. 
And, " Father, oh my head ! my head ! " is all that 

he can say. 
The parent raised his drooping child, and bade a 

servant bear 
The boy with tenderness and haste, to his fond 

mother's care. 
He sat upon her knees till noon ! she marked his 

closing eye, 
She felt his heart more feebly beat, she caught his 

parting sigh. 
Oh, who can tell what floods of grief rush o'er that 

mother's soul ! 
Oh, who can tell what strength of faith can yet that 

grief control ? 
She gives no cry, she seeks no aid, but silently com 
And on the prophet's lowly couch, her lit 

treasure lays. 

k2 131 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

Why does she seek that chamber out, why place the 

body there ? 
Oh ! 'tis because she knows, she feels, it is the place 

of prayer. 
The holy man of God for whom that simple room 

was made, 
Has often there for her and hers with pious fervour 

prayed. 
See how she cast one look of love ! then shuts the 

chamber door, 
And hastens forth with mien composed, and eyes 

that weep no more. 
She prays her lord with speed to send an ass and 

servant too, 
As she without an hour's delay would to Elisha go. 
Surprised, he asks, "But wherefore now? 'tis not 

the Sabbath-day, 
Tis not new moon." "It shall be well," her gentle 

accents say. 
Soon by the servant see her placed, and hear her 

meek command, 
To drive with speed, and not for her, keep back his 

urging hand. 
Far off the prophet sees her come, her movements 

fear inspire, 
He sends Gehazi of her health and household to 

inquire. 
"Run now, I pray thee, forth to meet this Shunam- 

mite, and say, 
Oh is it well with thee, thy lord, and little child to-day? " 
Simply she answers, "It is well ;" she knows her 

Father's will, 
Ilowe'er severe its dealings seem, is wise and 

gracious still. 
But on she presses to the hill where stands the man 

of God, 
And clasps his feet, and silent kneels, on Carmel's 

grassy sod. 

132 



PART in.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

Gehazi comes to raise her up, — his master's words 

forbid ; 
" Oh, touch her not, her heart is full, the cause from 

me is hid ; 
The Lord has not revealed the grief that weighs her 

spirit down, 
But deeply is her soul oppressed — stand back — let 

her alone." 
"My Lord! did I a son desire?" — at last these 

accents burst ; 
"Did I not say, Do not deceive thine handmaid's 

simple trust ? " 
At once these words the truth reveal : Elisha's kindly 

heart 
To the afflicted mother's soul hastes comfort to 

impart. 
" Gehazi, gird thy loins, and still with speed pursue 

thy way, 
Till on the pale face of the child my staff thy hand 

shall lay." 
So spake the prophet ; to his feet still does the 

mother cling : 
No touch but his, the man of God, to her can 

comfort bring. 
"As lives thy soul," she firmly says, "as lives thy 

God above, 
I will not leave thee, from thy side my steps shall 

not remove." 
Then rose Elisha at her word, and to the house of 

woe, 
(Gehazi passing on before) they both in silence go. 
No joyous child ran forth, as once, the prophet's 

smile to meet, 
To hail the guest so much beloved, and kiss his 

honoured feet. 
Gehazi (his sad task performed) as they approach 

the door, 
Tells them in death's cold sleep the child is lying as 
before. 

133 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

Elisha enters, and behold ! upon his bed is laid 
The lifeless body of the child, just as his servant 

said. 
He closed the door upon them twain, and then in 

fervent prayer, 
Besought the Lord of life to show his mighty power 

there. 
He stretched himself upon the boy, as though he 

would impart 
Breath to the little lifeless frame, warmth to the 

frozen heart. 
His mouth he presses to the lips, so motionless and 

pale: 
" Lord ! wilt thou suffer faith, and prayer, and love 

like this to fail?" 
Ah no ! returning signs of life, in answer from 

above, 
Reward the prophet's prayer of faith — he sees the 

infant move ; 
Beneath his touch the flesh grows warm, the eyes 

behold the light ; 
How feels Elisha as he looks upon the wondrous 

sight ! 
But not alone will he enjoy the mercies of that hour, 
He calls the mother to adore and praise Jehovah's 

power. 
He shows the child! — "Take up thy son" — low at 

his feet she falls, 
And oh what proofs of love and grace that moment 

she recalls ! 
See how she fondly clasps the child, to her by God 

twice given ; 
And feels she has received again her precious son 

from heaven ! 
Children, think of this mother's faith : think of this 

child restored, 
And learn to know, and trust, and love, Elisha's 

gracious Lord. 

M**M. 

134 



PART III. "| PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 



168. 



THE BLESSING OF A FAITHFUL AND 
PIOUS SERVANT 



A little captive maiden stood 

Before a Syrian dame ; 
A worshipper of Israel's God, 

From Israel's land she came ; 
The Syrian bands that land had sought, 
And that young maiden with them brought. 

And now in heathen land she sighed, 

A child of God apart ; 
No earthly friend her steps to guide, 

And soothe her aching heart ; 
But yet her father's God was there, 
To point her path, and hear her prayer. 

And he was pleased that child to make 

A messenger of good, 
For often of the seer she spake 

Who in Samaria stood ; 
And "Would to God," she sometimes said. 
" My Lord were to that prophet led ! " 

The simple tale we need not tell, 

Her words were not in vain ; 
Upon her master's ear they fell, 

And glorious was his gain ; 
His fearful leprosy was healed, 
And God was to his soul revealed. 

Lord ! wheresoever I may be, 

In high or low estate, 
May I be faithful found to Thee, 

And humbly on Thee wait ; 
And strive and pray thy truth to spread, 
E'en like that little captive maid ! 

M. A. STODART. 

135 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

169. DANIEL, SHADRACH, MESHACH, 
AND ABEDNEGO. 

" Our God whom we serve is able to deliver us." 
— Dan. iii. 17. 

Good Daniel would not cease to pray 

With all his foes in view ; 
He called on God three times a-day, 

As he was used to do ; 
Nor feared the power of wicked men, 
Who put him in the lion's den. 

Nor was he of those beasts afraid, 

Though ready to devour ; 
The Lord his God, to whom he prayed, 

Preserved him from their power : 
The hungry lions did not dare 
To touch the holy prophet there. 

And thus the Lord did once preserve 

Three good young men of old, 
Who did not dare bow down and serve 

The image made of gold : 
For as they feared his holy name, 
He saved them from the burning flame. 

Then let us walk in wisdom's way, 

Though troubles may afflict ; 
Though wicked people dare to say, 

We need not be so strict ; 
For God, who keeps his servants thus. 
Will surely be as kind to us.* 

* Original Hymns For Sunday Schools. 



136 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

NEW TESTAMENT.* 

1 70. SONG OF THE ANGELS ON THE BIRTH 
OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST. 

While humble shepherds watch their flocks 

In Bethlehem's fields by night, 
An angel sent from heaven appeared, 

And filled the plains with light. 

" Fear not," he said, (for sudden dread 

Had seized their troubled mind,) 
"Glad tidings of great joy I bring 

To you, and all mankind. 

" To you, in David's town, this day 

Is born, of David's line, 
The Saviour who is Christ the Lord ; 

And this shall be the sign — 

" The heavenly babe you there shall find 

To human view displayed, 
All meanly wrapped in swaddling bands, 

And in a manger laid." 

Thus spake the Seraph ; and forthwith 

Appeared a shining throng 
Of Angels, praising God, and thus 

They sang their joyful song. 

" All glory be to God on high, 

And to the earth be peace ; 
Good will is shown by heaven to men, 

And never more shall cease." 

171. THE AGED SIMEON'S JOY. 
Just and devout old Simeon lived ; 

To him it was revealed, 
That Christ, the Lord, his eyes should see, 

Ere they in death were sealed. 

* The subjects from the Gospels are arranged chronologically, 
according to Nevrcome. 

137 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

When Jesus, to the temple brought 

By Mary's pious care ; 
As Heaven's appointed rites required, 

To God was offered there. 

The Holy Spirit to those courts 

The aged Simeon drew, 
He saw the Virgin with her Son, 

And straight his Lord he knew. 

With holy joy upon his face 

The good old father smiled, 
Then fondly in his withered arms, 

He clasped the promised child. 

And while he held the Heaven-born Babe 

Who came to bless mankind, 
He spake with earnest look, and heart 

Rejoicing, yet resigned : 

" Now, Lord ! according to thy word 

Let me in peace depart ; 
Mine eyes have thy salvation seen, 

And gladness fills my heart. 

" At length my arms embrace my Lord, 

Now let their vigour cease ; 
At last my eyes my Saviour see, 

Now let them close in peace. 

" This great salvation, long prepared, 

And now disclosed to view, 
Doth prove thy love is constant still, 

And promises are true. 

" That sun I now behold, whose light 

Shall heathen darkness chase, 
And rays of brightest glory pour 

Around thy chosen race." 



138 



PABT ill.] PORTIONS 01 B MPTUBI BDDTORY. 



172. 



[ < GOD SO LOVED THE WORLD. 



" God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world, 
but that the world through him might be saved.'' — 
John iii. 14—18- 

As when the Hebrew prophet raised 

The brazen serpent high, 
The wounded looked, and straight were cured. — 

The people ceased to die ; 

So from the Saviour on the cross 

A healing virtue flows ; 
Who looks to him with lively faith, 

Is saved from endless woes. 

For God gave up his Son to death, 

So wondrous was his love, 
That all the faithful might enjoy 

Eternal life above. 

Not to condemn the sons of men 

The Son of God appeared ; 
No weapons in his hand are seen, 

Nor voice of terror heard : 

He came to raise our fallen state, 

And our lost hopes restore ; 
He leads us to the mercy-seat, 

And bids us fear no more. 

But vengeance just for ever lies 

On all the guilty race, 
Who God's eternal Son despise, 

And scorn his offered grace. 



173 



. THE LIVING WATER, OR JACOB'S 

WELL. 

LO Jacob's well a woman came, 
For water from a neighbouring town ; 

A stranger, there, unknown his name, 

Had, faint and weary, -at him down. 

139 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

He meekly said, " Give me to drink," 
As water from the well she drew ; 
Ah ! little did that woman think 
The tribute that to him was due. 

He asked for water, but had she 
Known that the Lord of life was there, 
For his salvation full and free, 
Had been her own, her earnest prayer. 

From his own lips the truth she learned, 
From his own love the gift received ; 
And in the stranger's form discerned 
That Lord in whom she now believed. 

Children, that kind and gracious Lord 
Is just as full of love for you ; 
Implore his Spirit, search his word, 
And you shall know and praise him too. 

He will the living stream impart, 
He will the Holy Spirit give ; 
O come, and he will fill your heart, 
O come, and drink of him, and live. 

d. A. T. 

174. AFFLICTIONS BRING US TO JESUS. 

" And himself believed, and his whole house." 
John iv. 53. 

Behold the spot on which Capernaum stands,* 
How beautiful the prospect it commands ; 
The peaceful lake, the distant mountains blue, 
The rich and smiling valley charm the view. 
And fresh the breeze that sweeps across the sea, 
The deep, still, lovely lake of Galilee. 
Perhaps we think that nobleman is blest 
Who in so fair a scene has fixed his rest, 

* Recent travellers describe the appearance of the lake of 
Gennesareth from Capernaum as singularly grand and im- 
pressive. — Rev. H. Horne. 
140 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

And quite forget that rank and wealth are vain 

To shield from grief, anxiety and pain. 

Alas ! the fevered pulse and languid eye 

Have caused that father many a mournful sigh ; 

Anxious he watches by that bed of pain, 

Oh ! will his darling son revive again ? 

But say ! what cheering thought has crossed his 

brow ? 
Why hastes he from the dying chamber now ? 
He leaves the house — no lingering, no delay — 
At once to Cana's hill* he bends his way ; 
The afflicted family and servants still 
Their anxious watch, and tender cares fulfil, 
But all in vain — the fever rages high, 
And soon, it seems, the noble youth must die. 
One, trembling, holds his hand within her own, 
And bends her ear to catch his dying groan. 
Why starts she thus ? — that parched hand and 

brow 
Seemed fanned, as by a sudden coolness now, 
As though a breath of pure and vital air 
Were breathed around that chamber of despair. 
Just at the seventh hour, with awe-struck heart, 
They seem to see the dread disease depart, 
And life, and health, and vigour once again 
Beam from those eyes, so late weighed down by pain. 
The faithful servants haste their Lord to find, 
And gladden with their tale the father's mind. 

Now, my dear children, let us mark with care 
What Scripture tells us of his faith and prayer. 
It was to Jesus that he bent his way 
On that most painful, yet most blessed day. 
Beseeching him to come and heal his son ; 
He rests not till the gracious deed is done ; 
The Saviour's kind rebuke can scarcely hear. 
But mingling hope with sad parental fear, 

* Cana is situated on a gentle eminence to the west of 
Capernaum. — Rev. H. He 

141 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

His full heart bursts in one imploring cry, 

" My Lord, come down ere yet my child shall die." 

Hark to that voice of mercy ! u Go thy way, 

Thy son doth live," we hear the Saviour say ; 

And lo ! it was just at the seventh hour 

That Jesus spake that word of love and power. 

Believes the man ? yes, with faithful heart, 

He does believe that word can life impart ; 

And who can tell what feelings in him burn, 

As homeward now his joyful footsteps turn, 

As the glad servants tell of health restored, 

And he remembers Christ's life-giving word ? 

Oh, as the happy family unite, 

And view that blooming face with fresh delight, 

As each glad tongue proclaims the Saviour's grace. 

Each grateful heart resolves to seek his face ; 

Do they regret the days of anguish past, 

The grief which led to such a Lord at last ? 

So may we learn to trust in darkest hour, 
So may we triumph in our Saviour's power. 



175. 



M 

THE WIDOW AND HER SON. 
Luke vii. 11—16 



A widowed mother lost her son, 

She had no son beside ; 
He was her loved, her only one, 

And he fell sick and died. 

And many a friend shed many a tear, 
But none had power to save ; 

They placed the body on the bier. 
To bear it to the grave 

And as they slowly passed along, 

Much people came from Nain, 
Where they had dwelt, and joined the throng. 

A sad and silent train. 
142 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

When lo ! a company appears, 

A band by Jesus led ; — 
Jesus can dry the mourner's tears, 

Jesus can raise the dead ! 

His heart, with tender pity moved, 

Felt for the widow's grief ; 
" Weep not," he said, and soon he proved 

His hand could give relief. 

He touched the bier, — the mourner's eyes 

Are fixed upon the Lord ; 
" Young man, I say to thee, Arise," 

Is His Almighty word. 

He rises up, — he speaks, — he lives ; 

No tear need now be shed ; 
Christ to the widowed mother gives 

The child she mourned as dead. 

They glorify the God of heaven, 
They praise the Saviour's name, 

And oh ! to us may grace be given, 
That we may do the same. 

For He who raised the widow's son 

Can raise us up on high ; 
And give us, when our work is done, 

To praise him in the sky. 

D. A. T. 

176. THE LITTLE SHIP ON THE WAVES. 

Mark iv. 37—41. 

A little ship was on the sea, 

It was a pretty sight ; 
It sailed along so pleasantly, 

And all was calm and bright. 

The sun was sinking in the west, 
The shore was near at hand ; 

And those on board, with hearts at rest, 
Thought soon to reach the land. 

143 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART in. 

When lo ! a storm began to rise, 
The wind grew loud and strong ; 

It blew the clouds across the skies, 
It blew the waves along. 

Oh ! how that little ship was tossed ! 

It rilled with water fast ; 
It seemed as though it would be lost, 

And must go down at last ! 

And all, but One, were sore afraid 

Of sinking in the deep ; 
His head was on a pillow laid, 

And he was fast asleep. 

" Master ! we perish — Master ! save," 
They cried, — their Master heard ; 

He rose, rebuked the wind and wave, 
And stilled them with a word. 

He to the storm says, "Peace, — be still," — 

The raging billows cease ; 
The mighty winds obey his will, 

And all are hushed to peace. 

They greatly wondered ! so may we, 

And ask, as well as they, 
Who could this glorious Person be, 

Whom winds and seas obey ? 

Oh ! well we know it was the Lord, 
Our Saviour and our Friend ; 

Whose care of those who trust his word 
Will never, never end. d. a. t. 

177. BREAD AND TO SPARE. 

" And Jesus saw much people, and was moved with com- 
passion towards them, because they were as sheep not 
having a shepherd." — Mark vi. 34. 

\Yiik\ many people thronged to hear 

The preaching of the word, 
They came from countries far and near, 

To listen to the Lord. 
144 



PARI III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

He preached the gospel to the poor, 

As he was wont to do ; 
He saw them weary, and was sure 

That they were hungry too. 

With kind compassion in his heart, 

And pity in his eye, 
The Saviour hastened to impart 

A blessing from on high. 

He sent his own disciples round 

To bid them take their seat, 
In companies, upon the ground, 

And give them food to eat. 

But no one save one little lad 

Could any food provide ; 
Five barley loaves were all he had, 

And two small fish beside. 

And they were very far from home, 

And knew not what to do ; 
Nor yet from whence more bread must come, 

But One was there who knew. 

He took the loaves, looked up, and brake, 

And blessed that little store ; 
And then, the more they seemed to take, 

It multiplied the more. 

For when five thousand men were fed, 

Who came to Jesus there ; 
Twelve baskets full of broken bread 

Were gathered up with care. 

For Jesus is a Friend indeed 

To all who are distrest ; 
He does both soul and body feed, 

He gives the weary rest. 

D. A. T. 



14o 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

178. THE MAN BORN BLIND RESTORED 

TO SIGHT. 
" I am the Light of the World. "—John ix. 5. 

Jesus was passing by, 

One sat in darkest night, 
Blind from his birth, his sightless eye 

Knew not the Lord of Light ; 
But Jesus marked him in the way, 
And touched his eyes with healing clay. 

"Unto Siloam go, 

There wash," the Saviour said ; 
He went — what splendours round him glow ! 

The shades of night are fled ; 
The pure, bright light on him is streaming, 
And things, till now unseen, are beaming. 

And I, too, was born blind ; 

In darkness dread and deep ; 
Light of the World ! illume my mind, 

Arouse me from my sleep ; 
Show me the wonders of thy word ; 
And make me know thee as my Lord.* 

M. A. STODART. 

179. CHILDREN BROUGHT TO CHRIST TO 

RECEIVE HIS BLESSING. 

" Suffer the little Children to come unto Me." Mark x. 14. 

When parents once to Christ their children brought, 
That he might lay his hands on them and pray ; 

The Lord's disciples in their hurry sought 
To send these little children all away. 

But Jesus was displeased that they should send 
One soul away who humbly sought his face ; 

More kind is he, more ready to attend 

Our simple prayer, than we to ask his grace. 

* From " Scriptural Poems for Children." 
146 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

He laid his gentle hands upon their head ; 

O ! what a gracious Saviour we have got ! 
" Suffer the little children," Jesus said, 

" To come unto me, and forbid them not." 

As a good shepherd gathers with his arm 
The tender lambs, and in his bosom lays 

And carries them, to keep them safe from harm, 
And feed and nourish them in pleasant ways, 

So does our Saviour to his bosom take 
The little children who to him are given ; 

He calls them all his lambs, and he will make 
Their souls his care, and guide them safe to 
heaven. 

With kind compassion, and with tender love, 
Jesus ! upon thy little flock look down, 

And with thy heavenly blessing from above, 

The prayers and labours of their teachers crown. 

I). A. T. 



180. 



THE SUPPER AT BETHANY. 



" And the house was filled with the odour of the oint- 
ment." — John xii. 3. 

When evening in her crimson dye, 
Had steeped the towers of Bethany, 

At twilight's shadowy fall ; 
A feast for Jesus was prepared, 
And those who loved him gladly shared, 

The quiet festival. 

Then calmly on the golden west 
The wearied daylight sank to rest — 

The world was wrapped in night ; 
O happy, chosen few, to be 
Among that blessed company, 

With Christ the Living Light ! 
Then Mary, at her Saviour's feet, 
Whilst thus they were in converse sweet, 

A precious ointment poured ; 

l2 147 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

And wiped it with her flowing hair, 
All silently, while kneeling there, 
And worshipped her Lord. 

But soon the quiet evening air 

Bore the sweet fragrance everywhere, 

As when night-flowers unfold ; 
Her secret gift of rich perfume 
Was wafted round the quiet room, 

Her lowly love was told. 

Thus, Saviour, may my grateful breath 
In trustful prayer and humble faith 

Silently rise to heaven ! 
Till all may see, that on my Lord 
My heart's deep worship hath been poured, 

My love as ointment given ! * 



181. 



JESUS MOCKED AS A SAVIOUR. 



" He saved others ; Himself he cannot save.'' — 
Matt, xxvii. 42. 

When scorn and hate and bitter envious pride 
Poured out their darts against the crucified, 
Found they no fault but this in Him so tried, 
" He saved others !" 

Those hands — thousands their healing touches knew, 
On withered limbs they fell like heavenly dew ; 
The dead have felt them, and have lived anew : 
" He saved others !" 

The blood is trickling slowly from them now ; 
Thou canst not raise them to thy bleeding brow, 
Nor on them thy parched lips and forehead bow. 
" He saved others !" 

That voice from out their graves the dead hath stirred, 
Crushed, outcast hearts grew joyful as they heard ; 
For every woe it had a healing word. 
" He saved others !" 

* " Hymns For The Fireside," by Mrs. Henry Lynch. 
148 



PART in.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

For all Thou had'st sweet tones of sympathy ; 
Hast Thou no word for this Thine agony ! 
Thou pitiedst all — doth no man pity Thee ? 
" He saved others !" 

So many fettered hearts thy touch hath freed, 
Physician ! and Thy wounds unstanched must bleed ? 
Hast Thou no balm for this Thy sorest need ? 
" He saved others !" 

Lord ! and one sign from Thee could rend the sky, 
One word from Thee, and low those mockers lie : 
Thou mak'st no movement, utterest no cry ; 
"And we are saved."* 

182. THE JOURNEY TO EMMAtTS. 
Luke xxiv. 13—32. 

It happened on a solemn eventide; 

Soon after he that was our Surety died, 

Two bosom-friends, each pensively inclined, 

The scene of all their sorrows left behind, 

Sought their own village, busied as they went, 

In musings worthy of the great event : 

They spake of Him they loved, of Him whose life, 

Though blameless, had incurred perpetual strife ; 

Whose deeds had left, in spite of hostile arts 

A deep memorial graven on their hearts. 

The recollection, like a vein of ore, 

The farther traced, enriched them still the more ; 

They thought him, and they justly thought him one 

Sent to do more than he appear'd to have done ; 

To exalt a people, and to place them high 

Above all else, and wondered he should die. 

Ere yet they brought their journey to an end, 

A stranger joined them, courteous as a friend ; 

And asked them, with a kind, engaging air, 

What their affliction was, and begged a share. 

Informed, he gathered up the broken thread, 

And, truth and wisdom gracing all he said, 

* By the Author of " Tales and Sketches of Christian Life .'' 

149 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

Explained, illustrated, and searched so well 
The tender theme on which they choose to dwell, 
That, reaching home," The night," they said, "is near; 
We must not now be parted, sojourn here." 
The new acquaintance soon became a guest, 
And, made so welcome at their simple feast, 
He blessed the bread, but vanished at the word, 
And left them, both exclaiming, " 'Twas the Lord ! 
Did not our hearts feel all he deigned to say ? 
Did they not burn within us by the way ?" 
Now theirs was converse such as it behoves 
Man to maintain, and such as God approves ; 
Their views, indeed, were indistinct and dim, 
But yet successful, being aimed at him : 
Christ and his character their only scope, 
Their object, and their subject, and their hope. 
They felt what it became them much to feel, 
And, wanting him to loose the sacred seal, 
Found him as prompt as their desire was true, 
To spread the new-born glories to their view. 

Cowper. 

183. THE HAPPY CONVERT. 

Acts viii. 26—40. 
" And he went on his way rejoicing." 

Barren and lonely is the desert strand, — 
A long farewell to Judah's pleasant land, — 
The land of promise ! and the land of light ! 
Of holy privilege, and high delight. 
To Gaza's ruins is the chariot come, 
Bearing the stranger to his distant home. 
That noble stranger ! mark his thoughtful brow ; 
It bears of anxious care the traces now. 
A few short weeks ago his heart had hailed 
This same lone spot with joy, while hope prevailed 
That obstacles surmounted, dangers past, 
He should ascend Jehovah's courts at last ; 
With holy worshippers unite to raise 
To Israel's God the psalm of solemn praise ; 
150 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

And still from learned scribes instruction gain, 

And clearer views of Israel's hope obtain. 

Alas ! the sigh that heaves his anxious breast 

Proves he has failed to find the promised rest. 

Dark clouds have mantled thick o'er Zion's hill, 

Uncertainty and strife her mansions fill ; 

Malice he there has found, and sullen fear, 

And rumours strange have reached his troubled ear 

When Israel's doctors fail where shall he turn ? 

How in Candace's palace truth discern ? 

Such thoughts may move him, but with stedfast 

mind, 
He grasps one treasure, trusting there to find 
The light he seeks. The Word he ponders o'er, 
And searches deep to reach its hidden store. 
iC Philip, arise !" Hark to that distant word ! 
Thus speaks afar the angel of the Lord. 
And led by him the teacher is brought nigh, 
E'en as the Ethiopian's chariot passes by. 
For man to man must preach Emmanuel's name, 
And man to man must Jesus' love proclaim. 
Surpassing grace ; thus worms of earth to raise, 
And suffer sinful lips to speak thy praise ! 
" Stranger, returning to thy heathen land, 
The word thou readest dost thou understand ?" 
Humbly Candace's minister replied, 
"How can I, except one should be my guide ? 
Who, in the wondrous passage I have read, 
Who is this Sheep, unto the slaughter led ? 
Who is this Lamb, so silent and so meek ? 
Of whom, I pray thee, does the prophet speak?" 
Then faithful Philip seated by his side, 
Tells him how Jesus lived, how Jesus died, 
How in that spotless unresisting Lamb, 
Was veiled the glory of the great "I Am." 
How He of sin endured the o'erwhelming load, 
To bring our guilty wandering souls to God. 
The stranger listens— but no words can tell 
The thoughts that in his raptured bosom swell. 

151 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

In that "dry root" from out the barren ground. 

The tree of Life his anxious soul has found. 

In that meek " man of sorrows" owns his Lord, 

And sees fresh glory in each living word. 

The Sun of Righteousness with healing wings, 

Joy and salvation to his spirit brings. 

And wells of hope and love unknown before 

Yield forth the riches of their secret store. 

But heaven-taught faith to swift obedience moves, 

And ever thus its holy nature proves. 

The ardent convert longs without delay 

To own his Saviour in the face of day. 

"What now doth hinder me to be baptized i 

See, here is water !" Joyful and surprised, 

The Teacher answers, "If with all thy heart 

Thou dost believe, thou mayest." Deep thoughts 

impart 
To both an energy that suits the hour, 
And clothes the convert's simple words with power : 
" I do believe that Jesus is the Son 
Of God Most High, the anointed Holy One." 
Then he commands the chariot to stand still, 
And both the appointed rite of Christ fulfil. 
Oh, happy stranger ! still more happy guide 
Ascending with him from the water side ! 
Brethren in faith, in hope, in holy love, 
Rejoicing angels hail ye from above. 
Oh moments worth a life of thoughtless mirth ! 
As days of heaven upon this fallen earth ! 
Ye seem to tell us of the joys to come, 
Ye breathe the fragrance of our heavenly home ; 
But on this earth ye were not made to stay, 
We taste your sweetness, and ye pass away. 
The Ethiopian nobleman must go 
And serve the Lord he just begins to know ; 
'Midst Afric's deserts make an oasis bloom, 
And cheer with Gospel light her Heathen gloom : 
While faithful Philip at Azotus found, 
Still publishing glad tidings all around, 

152 



PART in.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

Must with a constant and untiring zeal, 
His Saviour's Name to other hearts reveal. 
So be it, Lord ! if thus we best fulfil 
The gracious purpose of thy holy will. 
So be it, Lord ! for thou wilt still abide, 
And be of each the teacher and the guide. 

m ■ 



184. 



THE TRIUMPH OF GRACE. 



" Lord, what wilt thou hare me to do?" Acts ix. 6. 

M If any man be in Christ he is a new creature." — 
2 Cor. v. 17. 

Who is this with bearing high, 
Fiery zeal, and haughty eye ? 
" Breathing slaughter," on he rides, 
And his fierce companions guides. 
Like the dread volcano's gleam, 
Like the burning lava's stream. 
Many a Christian's doom is sealed, 
When his mission is revealed. 
By that proud and lofty brow, 
Well we " Saul of Tarsus" know. 

Who is this with shrouded eyes ! 
Prostrate on the ground he lies. 
See him now, with trembling feet, 
Seek Damascus' narrow street. 
Angels listen to the prayer 
Poured from contrite spirit there. 
Dawn at length breaks o'er the night, 
" Brother Saul, receive thy sight." 
Jesus' pierced yet loving hand 
From the burning plucks the brand. 

Who is this whose ardent love 
Glows with fervour from above ? 
Gladly now he spends his breath, 
Welcomes danger, toil, and death. 
Henceforth one his constant aim, 
Free salvation to proclaim. 

153 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

Jesus' boundless love declare, 
Jesus' cross and crown to share. 
Like the noble river's tide, 
Life springs up its course beside. 

Hark ! the hymn of praise we hear, 
Swelling on the midnight air. 
Who are they that pour the strain ? 
Prisoners bound with cruel chain. 
Brethern they in works of love ; 
Fellow-heirs of bliss above. 
Vainly tyrants would destroy 
Springs like theirs of secret joy, 
Which can make the dungeon bright 
With its own celestial light. 

Who is this on Asia's strand, 
Kneeling 'midst a weeping band ? 
Woman's love, and childhood's tear, 
Cling round him, their Father dear. 
Now they clasp his honoured feet, 
Now his longer stay entreat. 
Deep within he shares their pains, 
But a deeper love constrains. 
" Wherefore weep, and break mine heart ? 
Breaking, still I must depart." 

Yawns around a watery grave ! 
'Midst the dark tempestuous wave, 
Who is this unmoved by fear, 
Speaking words of hope and cheer, 
" God, who can alone preserve, 
Whose I am, and whom I serve, 
Sends his angel to declare, 
Still he will in pity spare." 
Paul, for love of Jesus bound, 
Thou art he thus dauntless found. 

Who is this, the aged saint, 
With long years of labour faint ? 
Faint in body, but within, 
Rising o'er a world of sin. 
154 



PART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

Triumphing through Jesus' blood, 

Hoping soon to cross the flood ; 

Writing, praying, pleading still, 

Leaving all to Jesus' will. 

Miracle of grace below ! 

"Paul the aged" well we know. m ** m. 

185. THE FRUITFUL DISCIPLE. 

" Full of good works and alms deeds. ,? — Acts ix. 36. 
The withering flash has struck the fruitful tree, 
Low in the dust its verdant head we see — 
And was there, then, no other to be found, 
No barren useless cumberer of the ground, 
That thou, O Death ! shouldst hither aim thy dart, 
And quench the light of love in Dorcas' heart ? 

Yes, deeply had she felt her Saviours love, 
And, quickened by His Spirit from above, 
" Receiving freely," did most freely give, 
And as a ministering angel live. 
Oh, who like her could wipe the flowing tear ? 
In hour of need, oh, who like her draw near ? 

Is there no hope ? oh, yield not to despair ! 
Lydda is nigh, and Peter sojourns there : 
A ray of comfort cheers the sorrowing train, 
His presence will at least relieve their pain. 
And as the faithful messengers depart, 
A softened sorrow steals o'er every heart. 

He comes at last ! oh, lead him to the room, 
Where she we love lies ready for the tomb ! 
Fresh bursts of grief the mournful sight renews, 
And touching is the scene that Peter views — 
The tranquil features of the silent dead, 
The widowed group that stand around the bed. 

Each weeping mourner will her case declare, 
And show some proof of Dorcas' tender care — 
The gifts of love, the garments she has made, 
Are by their eager, trembling hands displayed. 
The good Apostle, sorrowing, shares their grief ; 
Oh, will he be allowed to bring relief ? 

155 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

And now he seeks for solitude and prayer 
Alone with Jesus, humbly pleading there : 
That voice which bade Jairus' daughter rise, 
Can that not speak in power from the skies ? 
Strong, strong in faith, he kneels beside the dead, 
Then calls the gentle spirit that has fled. 

We seem to hear the wondrous word, " Arise !" 
We seem to see the gently opening eyes — 
The blood returning to each azure vein, 
The look of meek intelligence again ; 
We seem to feel the touch of Peter's hand, 
And share the joy of that rejoicing band. 

Oh, for the life of love that Dorcas led ! 

Such grateful tears shed o'er our dying bed, 

Such living faith in Jesus' power to save, 

A yet more blessed triumph o'er the grave, — 

A dearer voice to bid our dust arise, — 

"A morning without clouds" to meet our opening eyes. 

M**M. 

185.* PRAYER ANSWERED. 

" Many were gathered together praying/' — Actsxii. 12. 

Devout and earnest is the voice of prayer, 
And anxious, trembling hearts are gathered there — 
A lowly chamber, yet a peaceful home ; 
For thither Christian brethren love to come. 
Though in the city's midst, it shares the dew 
Of Hermon's hill, for hearts both fond and true 
There dwell in union, and together prove 
The fragrant influence of Emmanuel's love. 
But now they meet in sorrow — sighs and tears 
Reveal the bitter anguish of their fears ; 
They fear for one, now in the dungeon's gloom, 
Alas ! to-morrow sentenced to the tomb. 
The madden'd people, like a savage beast, 
Have tasted blood, and would renew the feast, 
Their cruel hate unquenched by one foul deed, 
James late has fallen, Peter now must bleed ; 
156 



FART III.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 

And Herod, marking well their savage joy, 

Learns thence what arts of pleasing to employ. 

But is there nothing loving hearts can do ? 

To cross the tyrant's will no course pursue ? 

Ah, yes ! 'tis prayer, deep, earnest, fervent prayer, 

That saves those trembling brethren from despair. 

They prayed — as pleaded Israel by the brook 

When Esau's martial bands their journey took ; 

As the proud eastern monarch's lowly wife 

Pleaded in Shushan for her people's life. 

But hark ! what sound has caught the listening ear 

Of the young Rhoda ? Now she turns to hear, 

Now hastes with eager gladness to relate 

" 'Tis Peter's voice — he stands before the gate." 

They gaze astonished on her beaming eye, 

But to her joyful tidings faith deny. 

" Sure thou art mad" — yet still the damsel pleads 

" 'Tis even so." A solemn awe succeeds : 

" It is his angel ! the death pang is o'er !" 

But that continued knocking at the door 

Claims to be answered, till with breathless gaze 

Each eye is fixed on Peter with amaze. 

But how describe the feelings that prevail, 

As that dear brother tells his wondrous tale, 

As all the scenes of that eventful night 

Pass in review before their mental sight ? 

The sleeping soldiers, and the guarded door, 

The radiance shining on the dungeon floor ; 

The angel's touch, the quickly falling chain, 

The opening gate, the fresh air breathed again ; 

The dreamy wonder passing from the mind, 

The holy awe and gratitude combined ; 

The sense of wonderful deliverance given, 

Of help vouchsafed direct from God in heaven. 

Oh, midst the rapture of that loving band, 

Who in the midnight hour round Peter stand : 

Is there no voice which gently chiding saith, 

" Why did ye doubt, oh ye of little faith ?" 

Yes, better than our fear, our hope, our prayer, 

So dost Thou oft, O Lord ! thy love declare. 

157 



PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. [PART III. 

Surpassing human faith, thy gifts alight, 

When scarce our trembling prayers seem winged for 

flight ; 
Midst groans and tears, as in the dust we lie, 
The threatening clouds have vanished from the sky. 
Each dreaded evil fades like mist away, 
Or gleams with radiance from the opening day : 
Some angel hand unclasps the dungeon chain, 
And light, life, liberty are ours again. 

M * * M. 

186. INSTANCES OF GRACE. 

" My grace is sufficient for thee." — 2 Cor. xii. 9. 

I sma the wonders grace can do — 

How it can change the heart ; 
What mighty strength it will subdue, 

And mightier strength impart. 

Grace makes the towers of pride to fall, 

And rage and hate relent ; 
Grace turned a proud, blaspheming Saul 

Into a praying saint. 

Grace gave him boldness to declare 

The truth in Jesu's name ; 
'Twas grace that made him strong to bear 

Affliction, want and shame. 

Grace moved a Matthew willingly 

To leave his all for Christ ; 
That little sentence, " Follow me," 

From Jesu's lips sufficed. 

Grace in Zaccheus gave away 

The half that he possessed ; 
And taught him four-fold to repay 

Whome'cr he had oppressed. 

Grace found its way to Peter's heart, 

When Jesus turned and looked ; 
And bitter tears the sin confessed, 

Which dying love rebuked. 
158 



PART in.] PORTIONS OF SCRIPTURE HISTORY. 



186. 



Grace made a timid Joseph bold, 

And Nicodemus too ; 
Not half the wonders can be told 

That grace divine will do.* 

THE SAINTS IN GLORY. 
Rev. vii. 13—17. 
How bright these glorious spirits shine ! 

Whence all their white array ? 
How came they to the blissful seats 
Of everlasting day ? 

Lo, these are they from sufferings great 

Who came to realms of light, 
And in the blood of Christ have washed 

Those robes which shine so bright. 

Now with triumphal palms they stand 

Before the throne on high, 
And serve the God they love, amidst 

The glories of the sky. 

His presence fills each heart with joy, 

Tunes every mouth to sing ; 
By day, by night, the sacred courts 

With glad hosannas ring. 

Hunger and thirst are felt no more, 

Nor suns with scorching ray ; 
God is the sun whose cheering beams 

Diffuse eternal day. 

The Lamb which dwells amidst the throne 

Shall o'er them still preside, 
Feed them with nourishment divine, 

And all their footsteps guide. 

In pastures green hell lead his flock, 

Where living streams appear ; 
And God the Lord from every eye 

Shall wipe off every tear. 

" Hymns for Young Minds." By Anne Houlditch. 
END OF PART III. 159 



, PART FOURTH. 
HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 



187. 



PRAYER. 



Prayer is the soul's sincere desire, 

Unuttered or expressed ; 
The motion of a hidden fire, 

That trembles in the breast. 

Prayer is the burden of a sigh, 

The falling of a tear ; 
The upward glancing of an eye, 

When none but God is near. 

Prayer is the simplest form of speech 

That infant lips can try ; 
Prayer, the sublimest strains that reach. 

The Majesty on high. 

Prayer is the Christian's vital breath, 
The Christian's native air ; 

His watchword at the gates of death : 
He enters heaven with prayer. 

Prayer is the contrite sinner's voice, 

Returning from his ways ; 
While angels in their songs rejoice, 
And cry, " Behold, he prays ! " 
160 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

The saints in prayer appear as one, 
In word, in deed, and mind ; 

While with the Father, and the Son, 
Sweet fellowship they find. 

Nor prayer is made on earth alone ; 

The Holy Spirit pleads, 
And Jesus, on the eternal throne, 

For sinners intercedes. 

Thou, by whom we come to God, 
The Life, the Truth, the Way ! 

The path of prayer thyself hast trod ; 
Lord, teach us how to pray ! 

MONTGOMERY. 

187* SECRET PRAYER. 

"Pray to thy Father which is in secret. '' — Matt. vi. 6. 

'Tis a solemn thing to pray ; 

'Tis to speak to Him who made us ; 
Who upholds us every day, 

And alone can bless and aid us. 

Sweet it is when all alone, 

To pour out our hearts before him ; 

Humbly kneeling at his throne, 
There to praise and to adore him. 

Saviour, all my need thou knowest, 
And my every thought canst see ; 

All I have 'tis thou bestowest ; 
Every blessing comes from thee. 

Often would I kneel before thee, 
When no eye can see but thine ; 

Saviour, hear a child implore thee, 
Oh, accept this prayer of mine. 

Let me love thee, let me fear thee, 

Let me follow in thy way ; 
Let me keep for ever near thee ; 

Guide me, Saviour, lest I stray. 

M 161 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 



188. 



THE NARROW PATH. 
"Enter ye in at the strait gate. "— Matt. vii. 13. 

There is a path that leads to God ; 

All others go astray : 
Narrow, but pleasant, is the road, 

And Christians love the way. 

It leads straight through this world of sin. 

And dangers must be passed : 
But those who humbly walk therein, 

Will get to heaven at last. 

How shall a feeble pilgrim dare 

This narrow path to tread ? 
For on the way is many a snare 

For youthful travellers spread : 

While the broad road, where thousands go, 

Lies near and opens fair ; 
And many turn aside, I know, 

To walk with sinners there. 

But lest my feeble steps should slide. 

Or wander from thy way, 
Lord, condescend to be my guide, 

And I shall never stray. 

Then I may go without alarm, 

And trust his word of old, 
" The lambs he'll gather with his arm, 
, And lead them to the fold." 

Thus I may safely venture through, 

Beneath my Shepherd's care, 
And keep the gate of heaven in view. 

Till I shall enter there. 
162 



part'iv.] hymns for the young. 



188.* 



THE PATH OF PEACE. 



u The path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth 
more and more unto the perfect day." — Prov. iv. 18. 

Oh guide my feet, and keep them in the way — 
The way of pleasantness, the path of peace ; 
Shine on my soul, and to the perfect day, 
Brighter and brighter still thy light increase ; 

That blessed light, which from the world above 
Points out the footsteps where thy saints have trod, 
And marks in wisdom, righteousness, and love, 
The road to heaven, to glory, and to God ! 

D. A. T. 

189. THE CLEAN HEART. 

" Blessed are the pure in heart," 

Oh for a heart to praise my God, 

A heart from sin set free ! 
Sprinkled with that atoning blood 

So freely shed for me ; 

A heart resigned, submissive, meek, 

My great Redeemer's throne ; 
Where only Christ is heard to speak, 

Where Jesus reigns alone : 

A humble, lowly, contrite heart, 

Believing, true, and clean ; 
Which neither life nor death can part 

From Him that dwells within : 

A heart in every thought renewed, 

And filled with love divine ; 
Perfect, and right, and pure, and good, 

A copy, Lord, of thine. 
Thy nature, gracious Lord, imparl ; 

Come quickly from above ; 
Write thy new name upon my heart, 

Thy new, best name of Love. 

M 2 163 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

190. CONFESSION, PRAISE, AND PRAYER. 

Lord ! when we bend before thy throne 

And our confessions pour, 
Teach us to feel the sins we own, 

And shun what we deplore. 

Our fallen spirits pitying see, 

True penitence impart ; 
Then let a healing ray from thee 

Beam hope upon the heart ! 

Oh, when our youthful tongues essay 

Their grateful songs to raise, 
Grant that our souls may join the lay, 

And rise to thee in praise ! 

When we disclose our wants in prayer, 

May we our wills resign ; 
And not a thought our bosom share, 

Which is not wholly thine ! 

May faith each meek petition fill, 

And waft it to the skies ; 
And teach our hearts 'tis goodness still. 

That grants it, or denies ! 



191. 



PRAISE. 

''Whoso offereth praise glorifieth me." — Psalm 1. 23. 
Let us sing, for we have reason ; 

Let us join with those above ; 
Praise is never out of season ; 

Let us praise the God of love. 
We have cause indeed to sing, — 
Jesus is our glorious King. 

When we reach the full enjoyment 
Of the state where sorrows end, 

Praise will be our sweet employment, 
We shall praise the sinner's Friend ; 

Christ, who washed us with his blood, 
Saved and brought us nigh to God. 
164 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

But how different then our praises, 
From the thanks we render now ; 

Well our coldness may amaze us, 
When we think how much we owe ! 

But no coldness will remain, 

When that glorious state we gain. 

Yet our God accepts our praises, 
Offered while we sojourn here ; 

He, on whom th' archangel gazes 
With delight and holy fear, 

Hears his people when they sing, 

And accepts the praises they bring. 



192. 



MORNING HYMN. 



"The Lord's mercies are new every morning." — 
Lam. iii. 23. 
Another night of sweet repose ! 

Again I wake in peace : 
Father of lights ! I bless thy name, 
Whose mercies never cease. 

Each day thou dost with tender love 

Rich blessings on me pour : 
I love thee, Lord ! but oh ! I would 

That I could love thee more. 

O pardon, pardon, all my sins, 

So many, and so great ; 
How often do I grieve my God ! 

Yet, surely, sin I hate. 

O never let me, Lord, forget 
That Christ has died for me ; 

And may his love constrain my soul 
To live, this day, to thee. 

193. MORNING, OR EVENING. 
My God, how endless is thy love ! 

Thy gifts are every evening new ; 
And morning mercies from above 
Gently distil, like early dew. 

165 



194. 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

Thou spread'st the curtain of the night, 
Great Guardian of my sleeping hours ; 

Thy sovereign word restores the light, 
And quickens all my drowsy powers. 

I yield my powers to thy command, 
To thee I consecrate my days ; 

And daily blessings from thine hand 
Demand my daily songs of praise. 

EVENING HYMN. 

Glory to thee, my God, this night, 
For all the blessings of the light : 
Keep me, keep me, King of kings, 
Beneath thine own almighty wings. 

Forgive me, Lord, for thy dear Son, 
The ill that I this day have done ; 
That with the world, myself, and thee, 
I, ere I sleep, at peace may be. 

Teach me to live, that I may dread 
The grave as little as my bed ; 
Teach me to die, that so I may 
With joy behold the judgment day. 

O may my soul on thee repose, 
And with sweet sleep mine eyelids close ; 
Sleep that may me more active make, 
To serve my God, when I awake. 

* When restless in the night I lie, 
My soul with heavenly thoughts supply ; 
Let no ill dreams disturb my rest, 
No powers of darkness me molest. 

may my soul for ever share 
The bliss of thy paternal care ; 
'Tis heaven on earth, 'tis heaven above, 
To see thy face and sing thy love. 

* The last four verses are suitable to be added in illness. 
166 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Should death itself my sleep invade, 
Why should I be of death afraid ? 
Protected by thy saving arm, 
Though he may strike, he cannot harm. 
For death is life, and labour rest, 
If with thy gracious presence blest ; 
Then welcome sleep, or death to me, 
I'm still secure, for still with thee, 

Praise God, &c. 

195. EVENING HYMN. 

" He that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep." 
— Ps. cxxi. 4. 
Through the day thy love hath spared us, 

Wearied we lie down to rest ; 
Through the silent watches guard us, 

Let no foe our peace molest. 
Saviour ! thou our guardian be, 
Sweet it is to trust in Thee. 

Pilgrims here on earth and strangers, 
Dwelling in the midst of foes ; 

Us and ours preserve from dangers, 
In thine arms may we repose ; 

And when life's short day is past. 

Rest with thee in heaven at last. 



196 



EVENING HYMN FOR A SCHOOL. 
See in the west now sets the sun ! 
The day declines fast, and our work is done ; 
But, ere we part, we'll bless that Friend 
Whose kindness knows no decline or end : 
Come, brothers, come, our hearts we'll raise. 
And cheerfully sing to our Father's praise. 

Guide of our youth ! we thank thee, Lord, 
That we are taught early to know thy word ! 
We to thy tender mercy owe 
Each various good we have below ; 
Come, brothers, come, we'll join to bleea 
The Friend of the poor and the fatherless. 

167 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

All we, like sheep, have gone astray, 
And every one turned his own false way. 
But, for each ill that we have done, 
There's mercy with thee, for thy dear Son. 
Come, brothers, come, we'll kneel and pray 
For pardon of all we have done to-day. 



197. 



EVENING THOUGHTS FOR A CHILD. 



" Keep me as the apple of the eye, .hide me under the 
shadow of thy wings." — Ps. xvii. 8. 

As at the fall of night, 

The bird in haste returning ; 
And wearied with its flight 

Its cradled home discerning ; 
There folds its wing, and hides its head, 
And nestles in its leafy bed ; 

As by the parent dam, 

(Kind nature's voice obeying,) 

The little suckling lamb 
Its feeble form is laying ; 

Enjoying all the good it knows, 

Its pleasant food, and calm repose ; 

As on the mother's breast, 

Safe in her watchful keeping, 
And softly hushed to rest, 

The little babe is sleeping ; 
Without a care, without a fear, 
Without a thought of danger near ; — 

So in my Saviour's grace, 

My Saviour's love confiding ; 

And till I see his face, 

Firm in his truth abiding ; 



As safe, as happy I may be, 
For Jesus watches over me. 



D. A. T. 



168 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

198. HYMN FOR SATURDAY EVENING. 

Safely through another week 
God has brought us on our way ; 

Let us now a blessing seek 

On the approaching Sabbath day : 

Day of all the week the best, 

Emblem of eternal rest. 

Mercies, multiplied each hour, 

Gracious Lord, our praise demand; 

Guarded by thy mighty power, 
Nourished by thy bounteous hand. 

Now from worldly care set free, 

May we rest this night with thee. 

When the morn shall bid us rise, 
May we feel thy presence near ; 

May thy glory meet our eyes, 
When we in thy house appear ; 

And may all our Sabbaths prove 

Foretastes of thy joys above 



199 



SABBATH MORNING. 

Another six day's work is done, 

Another Sabbath is begun ; 

May we enjoy in holy rest 

The sacred day which God has blessed. 

O that our prayers and thanks may rise 
As grateful incense to the skies ; 
And draw from heaven that sweet repose. 
Which he who rests in Jesus knows — 

That heavenly calm within the breast, 
Pledge of a yet more glorious rest, 
Which for the church of God remains, 
The end of cares, the end of pains. 
In holy duties let the day, 
In holy pleasures pass away : 
How sweet a Sabbath thus to spend, 
In hope of one that ne'er shall end ; 

169 



200. 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

THE EXCELLENCY OF THE 
SANCTUARY. 



" How aimable are thy tabernacles, O Lord of hosts ! 
Ps. lxxxiv. 1. 

Pleasant are thy courts above, 
In the land of light and love ; 
Pleasant are thy courts below, 
In this land of sin and woe. 

Happy birds that sing and fly 
Round thy altars, Most High ! 
Happier souls, that find a rest 
In a heavenly Father's breast ! 

Happy souls ! their praises flow 
Even in this vale of woe ; 
Waters in the desert rise, 
Manna feeds them from the skies. 

On they go from strength to strength, 
Till they reach thy throne at length, 
Grace and glory flow from thee : 
Shower, O shower them, Lord, on me ! 



201. 



INVITATION TO THE HOUSE OF GOD. 



" Every one that keepeth the sabbath from polluting it, 
and taketh hold of my covenant; even them will I 
bring to my holy mountain, and make them joyful in 
my house of prayer." — Isaiah lvi. 6, 7. 

Come to the house of prayer, 
And bow before the Lord ; 
Join in the praises offered there, 
And hear the preached word. 

Come to the house of God, 
Hear what the Scripture saith, 
How by the Saviour's precious blood 
Man is redeemed from death. 
170 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Come to the house of prayer, 
Where Jesu's people meet ; 
Pour out before him all thy care. 
Seek mercy at his feet. 

Come to the house of God, 
Come where his Spirit moves ; 
Come, sound Jehovah's praise abroad, 
With those whom Jesus loves. 

Sinner ! I pray thee, come, 
Wait not a moment's pace ; 
God hath not yet pronounced thy doom, 
For thee there still is grace. 

Come to the house of God. 
His pardon to implore ; 
Forsake the dangerous downward road, 
Despise his day no more. 



202. 



FOR THE LORD'S-DAY EVENING. 



Lord, how delightful 'tis to see 
A whole assembly worship thee ! 
At once they sing, at once they pray, 
They hear of heaven, and learn the way. 

I have been there, and still would go, 
'Tis like a little heaven below ; 
Not all my pleasure and my play 
Shall tempt me to forget this day. 

write upon my memory, Lord, 
The texts and doctrines of thy word ; 
That I may break thy laws no more, 
But love Thee better than before ! 

With thoughts of Christ, and things divine, 
Fill up this foolish heart of mine ! 
That, hoping pardon through his blood, 

1 may lie down, and wake with God. 

171 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 



203. 



SABBATH PEACE. 

AN EXTRACT. 



For our Sabbath peace we bless Thee 

For the quiet hour of prayer ; 
For the holy stillness resting 

On nature everywhere ; 
For the soft bells gently chiming 

Upon the quiet air ; 
For our Sabbath peace we bless Thee, 

For the quiet time of prayer ! 

For the calm and deep communion 

That contrite spirits feel, 
With Jesus the Redeemer, 

As in thy courts they kneel. 
There is water for the thirsty, 

Rest for the weary there ; 
For our Sabbath peace we bless Thee, 

For the quiet hour of prayer ! 

We fear not the oppressor, 

Nor the stern avenger's rod ; 
We bless Thee, that in boldness, 

We may kneel before our God. 
No chains, nor prison darkness, 

Our trembling souls to scare, — 
For our Sabbath peace we bless Thee, 

For the quiet time of prayer! 

For the banner of thy love, 

That floats above our path, 
When sorrow's angry billows 

Rise in tempestuous wrath ; 
For thy sustaining presence, 

Through six day's toil and care ; 
For our Sabbath peace we bless Thee, 

For the quiet time of prayer. 

MRS. HENRY LYNCH. 

172 



PART IY.] HY^rNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

204. MONDAY MORNING. 

Now let our heavenly plants and flower- 
Diffuse a fragrance more divine ; 

Refreshed by the sweet Sabbath showers, 
With richer beauty they should shine. 

We have been wafted for awhile 
Far, far away from this low scene ; 

Been cheer'd by our Redeemer's smile, 
Been suffer'd on his breast to lean. 

What has he taught us ? what should be 
The fruit of intercourse so blest ? 

0, should not all around us see 
His image on our souls imprest ? 

Within His ivory palace fair 

We entered — a much favoured train ; 

Myrrh, aloes, cassia, filled the air ; 
Our garments should the scent retain. 

And we should pass along the earth 
Like birds that live upon the wing ; 

Rise to the country of our birth, 
And on our way its anthems sing.* 

205. EMIGRANT'S MORNING HYMN, 

The sun is ris'n again ! 

Yet few his rising greet ! 

No cheerful songs of happy birds, 

No stir of busy feet. 

But far and wide, on either hand, 

None hail him but this pilgrim band. 

Lord Christ ! our Light and Life, 
Search Thou our dark hearts through. 
For thou who know'st each secret sin. 
Canst cleanse and pity too. 
The sun which shows our sins as night 
Will clothe the sinner in His light. 
" Hymns for a Week.'' 

173 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV- 

0, give us wakeful hearts, 
As children of the day, — 
Awake to watch and do Thy will, 
To labor, praise and pray. 
Slumber and dreams belong to night ; 
May we do all with all our might. 

O give us lowly hearts ! 
Bowed by the sense of sin ; 
Bowed lower by the wondrous love 
Which makes the sinner clean. 
Patient to bear with ill and wrong, 
As Thou hast borne with us so long. 

give us tender hearts 

To feel each other's care, 

To watch and help each other's need, 

Each other's burdens bear ; 

Rejoicing in the lowest place — 

The place of service and of grace. 

That so from this lone ship 

May sweeter music rise 

Than ever filled the woods in spring, 

Floating through sunny skies, 

From hearts forgiving and forgiven, — 

The music that they love in heaven. 



205. 



* EMIGRANT'S EVENING HYMN. 



The golden and the crimson glow 
Have faded from the sea, 
And all around us and below, 
Dark waves plash heavily. 

But, Jesus ! let Thy healing ray 
Upon our hearts be shed ; 
Thy presence makes the darkness day- 
Be Thou about our bed. 
174 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE TOUXG. 

The voice that whispers sin forgiven 
Can bid the storm be still ; 
The ocean is as calm as heaven, 
If such our Father's will. 

The winds and waves Thy laws must keep. 
However fierce and wild, 
And rock Thy children safe to sleep, 
As a mother rocks her child. 

Thus guarded by Thy love and grace. 
Calm may our slumbers be ; 
The ocean i3 a peaceful place 
To hearts at peace with Thee. 

Or if, while in Thy blood we trust, 
The tempest o'er us rolls, 
Thou knowest whence to wake our dust, 
And where to meet our souls.* 

206. MEEKNESS. 

"Peace, be still." 
Jesus, who bade the tempest cease, 

And calmed the raging sea, 
Can in my bosom whisper " Peace," 
And say " Be still" to me. 

My angry passions rise and swell, 

Just like the stormy wind ; 
And, Jesus, thou alone canst quell 

These tumults of the mind. 

When wicked tempers stir within, 

And vex my troubled soul, 
Do thou, great Conqueror of sin, 

My rage and pride control. 

Give me a spirit like thine own — 

The spirit of the dove ; 
And melt this stubborn heart of stone 
By the soft flame of love.t 
* By the Author of "Tales and Sketches of Christian Life." 
t M Hymns for Young Minds." 

175 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

206.* GOD GIVETH GRACE TO THE 
HUMBLE. 
" Be ye clothed with humility." 
Lord, if thou thy grace impart, 
Poor in spirit, meek in heart, 
I shall as my Saviour be, 
Clothed with humility. 

Simple, teachable, and mild, 
Humble as a little child ; 
Pleased with all the Lord provides, 
Weaned from all the world besides. 

Father ! fix my soul on thee, 
Every evil let me flee ; 
Nothing want beneath, above ; 
Happy in thy care and love. 

Oh ! that all may seek and find 
Every good in Jesus joined ; 
Him let every saint adore, 
Trust him, praise him, evermore, 

207, "CONSIDER YOUR WAYS/' 
Haggai 1.5. 

Oh, for a wise and serious mind 
To ponder well the path I take, 

Ere, to eternity consigned, 
In hell or heaven I awake ! 

Oh for a true, a living faith, 
To make the promises my own : 

An ear to hear what Jesus saith, 
An eye to look on Christ alone ! 

Thy Spirit, my Saviour ! give ; 

To me that living faith supply ; 
And let me to thy glory live, 

And let me to thy Glory die. 

D. A. T. 

176 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

208. SIN NO TRIFLE. 

" Fools make a mock at sin." — Prov. xiv. 9. 

Great God, 'tis written in thy book, 
" Fools make a mock at sin :" 

These words of thine are light and truth, 
And show me what's within. 

My conscience tells me, I the same 

Have very often done ; 
Smiled at my own and others' sin, 

And called it sport and fun. 

Thus, like a fool, I've dared to love 
What God doth most detest ; 

And that which sinks the soul to hell, 
Hath been my idle jest. 

Lord, the folly of my heart 

Before thee open lies ; 
Forgive my sin for Jesu's sake, 

And make me truly wise.* 

209. THE WAY OF ACCESS. . 

2 Cor. v. 21. 

One glance of thine, eternal Lord, 

Pierces all nature through, 
Nor heaven, nor earth, nor hell afford 

A shelter from thy view ! 

The mighty whole, each smaller part, 

At once before thee lies ; 
And ev'ry thought of ev'ry heart 

Is open to thine eyes. 
Though greatly from myself conceal'd, 

Thou seest my inward frame ; 
To thee I always stand reveal'd 

Exactly as I am. 

* " Hymns for Young Minds." 

N ] 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [rAKT IV. 

Since therefore I can hardly bear 

What in myself I see. 
How vile and blaek must I appear 

Most holy God to thee ! 

But sinee my Saviour stands between. 

In garments dyed in blood. 
Tis he, instead of me. is seen. 

When I approach to God. 

Thus, though a sinner I am safe ; 

He pleads before the throne. 
His life and death in my behalf. 

And calls my sins his own. 

What wondrous love, what mysteries 

In this appointment shine ! 
My breaches of the law are his. 

And his obedience mine.* 

:210. KINDNESS TO THE POOR PROVES 
OUR LOVE TO CHRIST. 
Matt. xxv. 40. 
High on a throne of light, Lord, 

Dost thou exalted shine : 
What can our poverty bestow. 

Since the whole world is thine ? 
But thou hast brethren here below. 

Partakers of thy grace. 
Whose humble names thou wilt confess 
Before thy Father's lace. 

In them thou mayest be clothed and fed. 

And visited and cheered : 
And. in their accents ot % disl 

Our Saviour's voice is heard. 

Whate'er our willing hearts can gi 

Lord, at thy feet we lay : 
Grace will the humble gift reoefr 

And grace at length repay. 

* Olney Hvmns. 

n 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

211. THE EVER-PRESENT GOD. 

God made the world — in every land 
His love and power abound ; 

All are protected by his hand, 
As well as British ground. 

The Indian hut, the English cot, 

Alike his care must own ; 
Though savage nations know him not, 

But worship wood and stone. 

He sees and governs distant lands, 
And constant bounty pours, 

From wild Arabia's burning sands 
To Lapland's frozen shores. 

In forest shades, and silent plains, 
Where feet have never trod, 

There in majestic power he reigns, 
An ever-present God. 

All the inhabitants of earth 
Who dwell beneath the sun, 

Of different nations, name, and birth, 
He knows them every one. 

Alike the rich and poor are known, 
The cultured and the wild ; 

The lofty monarch on the throne, 
And every little child. 

While he regards the wise and fair, 

The noble and the brave, 
He listens to the beggar's prayer, 

And the poor negro slave. 

He knows the worthy from the vile. 

And sends his mercies down : 
None are too mean to share his smile, 

Or to provoke his frown. 

N 2 179 



212 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

Great God ! and since thy piercing eye 

My inmost heart can see, 
Teach me from every sin to fly, 

And turn that heart to thee.* 



THE GOSPEL PREACHED IN THE 
OLD TESTAMENT TYPES. 

Israel, in ancient days, 

Not only had a view 

Of Sinai in a blaze, 

But learned the Gospel too ; 
The types and figures were a glass, 
In which they saw a Saviour's face. 

The paschal sacrifice, 
And blood-besprinkled door, 
Seen with enlightened eyes, 
And once applied with power, 

Would teach the need of other blood 

To reconcile a holy God. 

The lamb, the dove, set forth 
His perfect innocence, 
Whose blood of matchless worth 
Should be the soul's defence ; 
For he who can for sin atone 
Must have no failings of his own. 

The scape -goat on his head 

The people's trespass bore, 

And, to the desert led, 

Was to be seen no more : 
In him our Surety seemed to say, 
"Behold, I bear your sins away." 

Dipped in his fellow's blood, 
The living bird went free ; 
The type well understood, 
Expressed the sinner's plea ; 
Described a guilty soul enlarged, 
And by a Saviour's death discharged. 
* Hymns for Infant Minds, 
180 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Jesus, I love to trace, 

Throughout the sacred page, 

The footsteps of thy grace, 

The same in every age ! 
Oh grant that I may faithful be 
To clearer light, vouchsafed to me ! cowpek. 



213. 



THE EXCELLENCY OF THE BIBLE. 

2 Tim. iii. 15. 

Great God, with wonder and with praise, 

On all thy works I look ; 
But still thy wisdom, power, and grace, 

Shine brightest in thy Book. 

The stars that in their courses roll, 

Have much instruction given ; 
But thy good word informs my soul 

How I may climb to heaven. 

The fields provide us food, and show 

The goodness of the Lord ; 
But fruits of life and glory grow 

In thy most holy word. 

Here are our choicest treasures hid, 

Here our best comfort lies ; 
Here our desires are satisfied, 

And hence our hopes arise. 

Lord, make me understand thy law, 
Show what my faults have been ; 

And from thy Gospel let me draw 
Pardon for all my sin. 

Here would I learn how Christ has died 

To save my soul from hell ; 
Not all the books on earth beside 

Such heavenly wonders tell. 
Then let me love my Bible more, 

And take a fresh delight 
By day to read these wonders o'er, 

And meditate by night. 

181 



214. 



HOIKS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

: THE ENTRANCE OF THY WORD 
GIVETH LIGHT." 



" My doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall 
distil as the dew." — Deut. xxxii. 2. 

Fair as the sunny beams of light, 
That cast upon the mountain height 

Their rich and golden ray ; 
Thy truth, thy glorious truth hath shone, 
To make surpassing wonders known, 

And guide us on our way. 

Gentle, refreshing as the dew, 
Which falls in silence, to renew 

Earth's parched and fading face ; 
Thou dost in tenderest love impart, 
To cheer, renew, and bless the heart 

The Spirit of thy grace. 

O cherish still, direct and bless, 
And keep in paths of righteousness 

The purchase of Thy love ; 
Till, raised from this dark vale of death, 
We praise thee with immortal breath, 

In Thy bright world above. 

D. A. T. 

215. A CHRISTIAN CHILD'S REMEMBRANCE 
OF PAST MERCIES. 

When all thy mercies, O my God, 

My rising soul surveys, 
Transported with the view, I'm lost 

In wonder, love, and praise. 

Oh ! how can words with equal warmth 

The gratitude declare, 
The love that glows within my heart ? 

But thou canst read it there. 

182 



PART IV.] HT]V£NS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Thy providence my life sustained, 
And all my wants redrest, 

When as a helpless babe I lay 
And hung upon the breast. 

To all my weak complaints and cries 

Thy mercy lent an ear, 
Ere yet my feeble thoughts had learned 

To form themselves in prayer. 

Unnumbered comforts to my soul 
Thy tender care bestowed, 

Before my infant heart conceived 
From whom those comforts flowed. 

Ten thousand thousand precious gifts 

My daily thanks employ, 
Nor is the least a cheerful heart 

That tastes these gifts with joy. 

Through every period of my life 

May I thy love proclaim, 
And after death in distant worlds, 

Resume the glorious theme. 

When nature fails, and day and night 
Divide thy works no more, 

Oh ! may my ever grateful heart 
Thy mercy still adore. 

Through all eternity to Thee, 

A grateful song 111 raise ; 
For oh ! eternity's too short 

To utter all thy praise. 



215. 



3£ 

GRATITUDE FOR SPIRITUAL 



MERCIES. 
,( We love Him, because He first loved us" — 1 John iv. 19. 

We love Thee, Lord, because when we 

Had err'd and gone astray, 
Thou didst recall our wand'ring souls 

Into the homeward way. 

1S3 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

When helpless, hopeless, we were lost 

In sin and sorrow's night, 
Thou didst send forth a guiding ray 

Of Thy benignant light. 

Because when we forsook thy way, 

Nor kept thy holy will, 
Thou wert not an avenging Judge, 

But a gracious Father still : 
Because we have forgot thee, Lord. 

But thou hast not forgot, — 
Because we have forsaken thee, 

But thou forsakest not. 

Because, Lord, thou loved'st us 

With everlasting love ; 
Because thou gav'st thy Son to die, 

That we might live above : 
Because when we were heirs of wrath, 

Thou gav'st the hope of heaven ; 
We love because we much have sinned 

And much have been forgiven.* 



216 



THANKSGIVING. 



" What shall I render unto the Lord for all his benefits 
toward me?" — Ps» cxvi. 12. 

For mercies countless as the sands, 

Which daily I receive 
From Jesus my Redeemer's hands, 

My soul, what canst thou give ? 

Alas ! from such a heart as mine 
What can I bring him forth ? 

My best is stained and dyed with sin, 
My all is nothing worth. 

Yet this acknowledgment I'll make 

For all He has bestowed ; 
Salvation's sacred cup I'll take, 

And call upon my God. 

* Spiritual Songs. 
184 



FART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

The best return for one like me, 
So helpless and so poor, 

Is, from his gifts to draw a plea, 
And ask him still for more. 

I cannot serve him as I ought, 
No works have I to boast : 

Yet would I glory in the thought, 
That I shall owe him most. 



217. 



THE MERCIES OF GOD INNUMERABLE. 



'If I would declare and speak of them they are more 
than can be numbered." — Ps. xl. 5. 

Lord of Light ! enthroned in glory, 
Wondrous are thy works of old ; 

Mortal tongue the matchless story 
Of thy love can ne'er unfold. 

Would I reckon all I owe Thee ? 

Count Thy mercies — "ever new ?" 
Mountain heights rise up before me, — 

Depths unfathomed meet my view. 

Vain the task ! what foot shall ever 

Himalay's summits gain ? 
Or what piercing eye discover 

Fountains of the Atlantic main ? 

Vain the task ! yet heavenly pleasure 
Spreads like sunshine o'er my soul, 

And the still increasing treasure 
Binds me to thy sweet control. 

Oh ! may gratitude constrain me, 
Living faith, which works by love, 

Humble service here to yield thee, 
Perfect praise in realms above. 

M * * M 

185 



'218. 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUXG. [PART IV. 



THANKSGIVING FOR HARVEST. 



219. 



Praise to God, immortal praise, 
For the love that crowns our days ! 
Bounteous Source of every joy, 
Let thy praise our tongues employ ! 
For the blessings of the field ; 
For the stores the gardens yield ; 
For the joy which harvests bring ; 
Grateful praises now we sing. 
Clouds, that drop refreshing dews ; 
Suns, that genial heat diffuse ; 
Flocks, that whiten all the plain ; 
Yellow sheaves of ripened grain : 
All that Spring, with bounteous hand, 
Scatters o'er the smiling land ; 
All that liberal Autumn pours 
From her overflowing stores : 
These, great God, to thee we owe ; 
Source whence all our blessings flow ; 
And for these our souls shall raise 
Grateful vows, and solemn praise. 

THE VISIBLE CREATION. 



The God of nature and of grace 

In all his works appears ; 
His goodness through the earth we trace, 

His grandeur in the spheres. 

Behold this fair and fertile globe, 
By Him in wisdom planned ; 

'Twas He who girded, like a robe, 
The ocean round the land. 

Lift to the firmament your eye, 
Thither his path pursue ; 

His glory, boundless as the sky, 
O'erwhehns the wondering view. 
186 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

He bows the heavens, the mountains stand 

A highway for their God ; 
He walks amidst the desert land, 

Tis Eden where He trod. 

The forests in his strength rejoice ; 

Hark ! on the evening breeze, 
As once of old, the Lord God's voice 

Is heard among the trees. 

Here on the hills He feeds his herds, — 

His flocks on yonder plains : 
His praise is warbled by the birds ; 

O could we catch their strains, — 

Mount with the lark, and bear our song 

Up to the gates of light, 
Or with the nightingale prolong 

Our numbers through the night ! 

In every stream his bounty flows, 

Diffusing joy and wealth ; 
In every breeze his Spirit blows 

The breath of Life and health. 

His blessings fall in plenteous showers 

Upon the lap of Earth, 
That teems with foliage, fruit, and flowers, 

And rings with infant mirth. 

If God hath made this world so fair, 

Where sin and death abound, 
How beautiful beyond compare 

Will Paradise be found ! 

MONTGOMERY. 



220. 



MISSIONARY HYMN. 

From Greenland's icy mountains, 
From India's coral strand ; 

Where Afric's sunny fountains 
Roll down their golden sand : 



187 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

From many an ancient river, 

From many a palmy plain, 
They call us to deliver 

Their land from error's chain. 

What though the spicy breezes 

Blow soft o'er Ceylon's isle ; 
Though every prospect pleases, 

And only man is vile : 
In vain with lavish kindness 

The gifts of God are strewn ; 
The heathen, in his blindness, 

Bows down to wood and stone. 

Shall we, whose souls are lighted 

With wisdom from on high — 
Shall we, to men benighted, 

The lamp of life deny ? 
Salvation ! oh, salvation ! 

The joyful sound proclaim; 
Till each remotest nation 

Has learnt Messiah's name 

Waft, waft, ye winds, his story, 

And you, ye waters, roll, 
Till, like a sea of glory, 

It spreads from pole to pole ; 
Till o'er ransomed nature, 

The Lamb for sinners slain, 
Redeemer, King, Creator, 

In bliss returns to regin. 



Heber. 



221. MISSIONARY HYMN. 

Matt, xxviii. 19. 20. 

Roll on, thou mighty ocean, 
And as thy billows flow, 

Bear messengers of mercy 
To every land below. 

188 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Arise, ye gales, and waft them 
Safe to the destined shore, 

That man may sit in darkness 
And death's deep shade no more. 

O thou Eternal Ruler, 

Who rulest with thy arm 
The tempests of the ocean, 

Protect them from all harm ; 
Thy presence e'er be with them, 

Wherever they may be ; 
Though far from those who love them, 

Still let them be with thee. 



222. 



^THY KINGDOM COME. 1 



" Thy kingdom come ;" from day to day 
We lift our hands to God and pray ; 
But who has ever duly weighed, 
Or pondered on the words he said ? 

"Thy kingdom come ;" day of joy ! 
When praise shall every heart employ, 
When hatred, strife, and battles cease, 
And man with man shall be at peace. 

Then all will know and love the Lord, 
And live according to His word; 
And every evil will remove, 
For God will reign, and " God is Love" 



223. 



D. A. T. 

CHRIST THE CAPTAIN OF SALVATION. 



Captain of Israel's host, and guide 
Of all who seek the land above ; 

Beneath thy shadow we abide, 

The cloud of thy protecting love ; 

Our strength, thy grace; our rule, thy word ; 

Our end, the glory of the Lord. 

189 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

By thine unerring Spirit led, 

We shall not in the desert stray ; 
Our table by thy bounty spread, 

Our wants supplied from day to day ; 
As far from danger as from fear, 
While Love, Almighty Love, is there. 



224. 



CHRIST THE GOOD SHEPHERD. 



224. 



Shepherd of thy little flock, 
Lead me by the shadowing rock, 
Where the richest pasture grows, 
Where the living water flows. 

By that pure and silent stream, 
Shelterd from the scorching beam, 
Shepherd, Saviour, Guardian, Guide, 
Keep me ever near thy side. 

THE SAME SUBJECT. 

See, the kind Shepherd, Jesus, stands, 
And calls his sheep by name ; 

Gathers the feeble in his arms, 
And feeds each tender lamb. 

He leads them to the gentle stream, 

Where living water flows ; 
And guides them to the verdant fields, 

Where sweetest herbage grows. 

When, wandering from the peaceful fold, 

We leave the narrow way, 
Our faithful Shepherd still is near, 

To Seek us when we stray. 

The weakest lamb amidst the flock 
Shall be its Shepherd's care ; 

While folded in our Saviour's arms, 
We're safe from every snare. 
190 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 



225. 



225 



CHRIST THE TRUE PHYSICIAN. 

Oh, who can give the blind their sight, 

And make the simple wise, 
And pour a flood of holy light 

On nature's darkened eyes ? 

Who can with vital strength supply 
The withered, halt, and lame ? 

And give a living energy 
To nature's failing frame ? 

Oh, who can give the heart relief, 

The sinking spirits raise, 
And change the heavy sigh of grief 

To songs of joy and praise ? 

Thou great physician of the soul, 

To thee we tune our song ; 
And thus while endless ages roll, 

The grateful theme prolong. 

'Tis Jesus gives the blind their sight, 

And makes the simple wise, 
And pours a flood of holy light 

On nature's darkened eyes ; 

And He will give the heart relief, 

The sinking spirits raise, 
And change the heavy sigh of grief 

To songs of joy and praise. d. a. t. 

* CHRIST THE SURE REFUGE. 
Isaiah xxv. 7. 

Jesus, lover of my soul, 

Let me to thy bosom fly, 
While the billows near me roll ; 

While the tempest still is high. 
Hide me, O my Saviour, hide, 

Till the storm of life is past ; 
Safe into the haven guide, 

receive my soul at last ! 

191 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

Other refuge have I none, 

Hangs my helpless soul on Thee ; 
Leave, leave me not alone, 

Still support and comfort me ! 
All my trust on Thee is stayed, 

All my help from Thee I bring ; 
Cover my defenceless head 

With the shadow of thy wing ! 

Plenteous grace with Thee is found, 

Grace to pardon all my sin ; 
Let the healing streams abound ; 

Make and keep me pure within ! 
Thou of life the fountain art, 

Freely let me take of Thee ; 
Spring thou up within my heart. 

Rise to all eternity ! 

226. CHRIST THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD. 
John viii. 12. 

Christ, whose glory fills the skies ; 

Christ, the true and only Light, 
Sun of Righteousness, arise, 

Triumph o'er the shades of night ! 
Day-spring from on high, be near ; 
Day-star, in my heart appear ! 

Dark and cheerless is the morn 

Unaccompanied by thee ; 
Joyless is the day's return 

Till thy mercy's beams we see ; 
Till they inward light impart, 
Glad the eyes and warm the heart ! 

Visit, then, this soul of mine : 

Pierce the gloom of sin and grief ; 

Fill me, Radiancy Divine, 
Scatter all my unbelief; 

More and more thyself display, 

Shining to the perfect day. 
192 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

226.* CHRIST THE WAY, AND THE TRUTH, 

AND THE LIFE. 

John xiv. 6. 

Thou art my way, let me abide 
In thee, my Lord, nor turn aside, 

What voice soe'er invite ; 
Nor let my trembling footsteps fail, 
Till, streaming o'er death's shadowy vale, 

I see heaven's glorious light ! 

Thou art my truth ! — in thee I find 
All that renews and heals my mind, 

Enlightens it and cheers ; 
On thee I feed, in thee I rest, 
Nourished and satisfied and blest, 

Set free from doubts and fears. 

Thou art my life ! — spring up in me, 
A well of living water be, — 

A fount of purity ; 
Grow deeper, mightier, day by day, 
Till old things shall have past away, 

And sin itself shall die. 

Jesus my way my truth my life, — 
Sheltered from earth's turmoil and strife, 

How blest a lot is mine ! 
Thy word I trust, thy praise I sing, 
Safe 'neath the covert of thy wing, 

And filled with peace divine.* 



227. 



CHRIST THE ROCK OF AGES. 



Rock of Ages, cleft for me, 
Let me hide myself in thee ! 
Let the water and the blood 
From thy riven side which flowed, 
Be of sin the double cure, 
Cleanse me from its guilt and power. 
From the " Christian Remembrancer" for 1846. 

o 193 



227. 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

Not the labours of my hands 
Can fulfil thy law's demands ; 
Could my zeal no respite know, 
Could my tears for ever flow, 
All for sin could not atone : 
Thou must save, and thou alone. 

Nothing in my hand I bring, 
Simply to thy cross I cling ; 
Helpless, look to thee for grace, 
Guilty, plead thy righteousness. 
Vile, I to the fountain fly ; 
Wash me, Saviour, or I die ! 

While I draw this fleeting breath, 
When my eyelids close in death, 
When I soar to worlds unknown, 
See thee on thy judgment throne, 
Rock of Ages, cleft for me, 
Let me hide myself in thee ! 

CHRIST THE FOUNTAIN OPENED. 
Zech. xiii. 1. 



There is a fountain filled with blood, 
Drawn from Emanuel's veins ; 

And sinners plunged beneath that flood, 
Lose all their guilty stains. 

The dying thief rejoiced to see 

That fountain in his day ; 
And there may I, as vile as he, 

Wash all my sins away. 

Dear dying Lamb, thy precious blood 

Shall never lose its power, 
Till all the ransomed Church of God 

Be saved to sin no more. 

E'er since, by faith, I saw the stream 

Thy flowing wounds supply, 
Redeeming love has been my theme, 
And shall be till I die. 
194 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Then, in a nobler, sweeter song, 

I'll sing thy power to save ; 
When this poor lisping, stammering tongue 

Lies silent in the grave. 

COWPER. 

228. CHRIST THE REDEEMER. 

"I have found a ransom." — Job xxxiii. 24, 

" He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised 
for our iniquities : the chastisement of our peace was 
upon him; and with his stripes we are healed." — 
Isaiah, liii. 5. 

Oh wonder past expression ! 

Chastened and bruised for me, 
Stricken for my transgression, 

The Lord, my God, I see ; 
My grief and shame enduring, 

He poured his soul to death ; 
My endless life securing, 

When he resigned his breath. 

With deep humiliation 

I seek thy mercy-seat, 
Thou God of my salvation, 

To worship at thy feet : 
Teach me, this world forsaking. 

To glory in thy cross ; 
And, thee my portion making, 

Count all beside as loss. 

Oh grant thy promised Spirit, 

Thine image, Lord, restore, 
And fit me to inherit 

Where thou art gone before ; 
While here, thy servant make me, 

Thy cheering presence give ; 
And then to glory take me, 

To see thy face— and live. 

D. A. T. 

o 2 195 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

OOQ * CHRIST THE ADVOCATE. 
&AKJ. Heb> vii# 25# 

Plead thou, — oh, plead my cause ! 

Each self-excusing plea 

My trembling soul withdraws, 

And flies to thee. 
Where justice rears her throne, 
Ah ! who, save thee alone, 
May stand, O spotless One ? 

Plead thou my cause ! 

Ah ! plead not ought of mine, 
Before thine altar thrown : 
Fragments — when all is thine, 

All, all thine own ! 
Thou seest what stains they bear : 
Oh ! since each tear, each prayer, 
Hath need of pardon there, 

Plead thou my cause ! 

With lips that, dying, breathed 
Blessings for words of scorn ; 
With brow when I had wreathed 

The piercing thorn ; 
With breast to whose pure tide 
He did the weapon guide, 
Who hath no home beside, 

Plead thou my cause ! 

Plead, when the tempter's art 
To each fond wish of mine, 
Denies this faithless heart 

Can e'er be thine. 
If slander whisper, too, 
The sin I never knew, 
Thou, who couldst urge the true, 

Plead thou my cause ! 
Oh ! plead my cause above ; 
Plead thine within my breast, 
Till there thy peaceful Dove 

Shall build her nest. 
196 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Thou knows't this will, how frail ; 
Thou knows't, though language fail, 
My soul's mysterious tale : 
Plead thou my cause ! 

WARING. 

229. CHRIST ALL-SUFFICIENT. 

" Unto you which believe he is precious. w — 1 Pet. ii. 7. 
Draw me, my Saviour, after thee ! 
So shall I run, and never tire ; 
With gracious words still comfort me ; 
Be thou my hope, my sole desire. 
Free me from every snare ; nor fear, 
Nor sin, can come if thou art there. 

What in thy love possess I not ? 

My star by night, my sun by day ; 

My spring of life, when parched with drought ; 

My wine to cheer, my bread to stay, 

My strength, my shield, my safe abode, 

My robe before the throne of God. 

In weakness, Lord, be thou my strength ; 
In suffering, Lord, be thou my power; 
And when the storms of life shall cease, 
Jesus, in that important hour, 
In death, as life, be thou my guide, 
And save me, who for me hast died. 

229. SAME subject. 

" For it pleased the Father that in Him should all fulness 
dwell."— Col. i. 19. 

I lay my sins on Jesus, 
The spotless Lamb of God; 

He bears them all, and frees us 
From the o'erwhelming load. 

I bring my guilt to Jesus, 
To wash my crimson stains 

White in his blood most precious, 
Till not a spot remains. 

197 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

I lay my wants on Jesus, 

All fulness dwells in him, 
He healeth my diseases, 

He doth my soul redeem. 

I lay my griefs on Jesus, 
My burdens and my cares ; 

He from them all releases, 
He all my sorrows shares. 

I love the name of Jesus — 
Immanuel, Christ, the Lord ! 

Like fragrance on the breezes, 
His name is spread abroad. 

I long to be like Jesus — 

Meek, loving, lowly, mild ; 
I long to be like Jesus — 

The Father's only child. 

I long to be with Jesus, 

Amid the heavenly throng, 
To sing with saints his praises, 

To learn the angels' song. 

230. "IT IS FINISHED!" 

"It is finished !" Shall we raise 
Songs of sorrow, or of praise ; 
Mourn to see the Saviour die, 
Or triumph in his victory ? 

If of Calvary we tell, 
How can songs of triumph swell ? 
If of man redeemed from woe, 
How shall notes of mourning flow ? 

Ours the guilt which pierced his side, 
Ours the sin for which he died ; 
But the blood which flowed that day 
Washed our sin and guilt away. 
198 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Lamb of God ! thy death has given 
Pardon, peace, and hope of heaven ; 
" It is finished !" let us raise 
Songs of thankfulness and praise. 



23(V 



PRAISE TO CHRIST. 



Come, let us join our cheerful songs 
With angels round the throne ; 

Ten thousand thousand are their tongues, 
But all their joys are one. 

" Worthy the Lamb that died," they cry, 

"To be exalted thus ;" 
" Worthy the Lamb," our lips reply, 

" For He was slain for us." 

Jesus is worthy to receive 

Honour and power divine ; 
And blessings more than we can give, 

Be, Lord, for ever thine. 

Let all creation join in one, 

To bless the sacred name 
Of Him who sits upon the throne, 

And to adore the Lamb. 



231. 



COMING TO JESUS. 



" Him that cometh unto me, I will in no wise cast out. 1 
— John vi. 37. 

Just as I am, — without one plea, 
But that thy blood was shed for me, 
And that thou bidd'st me come to thee, 
Lamb of God, I come ! 

Just as I am, — and waiting not 
To rid my soul of one dark blot, 
To thee, whose blood can cleanse each spot, 
Lamb of God, I come ! 

199 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

Just as I am, — though tossed about 
With many a conflict, many a doubt, 
"Fightings within, and fears without," 
Lamb of God, I come ! 

Just as I am, — poor, wretched, blind, 
Sight, riches, healing of the mind, 
Yea, all I need in thee to find, 

O Lamb of God, I come ! 

Just as I am, — thou wilt receive, 
Wilt welcome, pardon, cleanse, relieve : 
Because thy promise I believe, 

Lamb of God, I come ! 

Just as I am, — thy love, I own, 
Has broken every barrier down : 
Now, to be thine, yea, thine alone, 

O Lamb of God, I come ! 

231. THE ACCEPTED BELIEVER. 

"Accepted in the Beloved." — Ephes. i. 3—6. 

The wanderer no more will roam, 
The lost one to the fold hath come, 
The Prodigal is welcomed home, 

O Lamb of God, in thee ! 

Though clad in rags, by sin defiled, 
The Father hath embraced his child, 
And I am pardoned, reconciled, 

O Lamb of God, in thee ! 
It is the Father's joy to bless, 
His love provides for me a dress, 
A robe of spotless righteousness, 

O Lamb of God, in thee ! 

Now shall my famished soul be fed, 
A feast of love for me is spread, 
I feed upon "the children's bread," 

Lamb of God, in thee ! 
200 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

Yea, in the fulness of his grace, 
He puts me in the children's place, 
Where I may gaze upon his face, 

Lamb of God, in thee ! 

I cannot half his love express, 

Yet, Lord ! with joy my lips confess, 

This blessed portion I possess, 

O Lamb of God, in thee ! 

It is thy precious name I bear, 
It is thy spotless robe I wear, 
Therefore, the Father's love I share, 

O Lamb of God, in thee ! 

And when I in thy likeness shine, 
The glory and the praise be thine, 
That everlasting joy is mine, 

O Lamb of God, in thee ! 

232. "SET YOUR AFFECTIONS ON 
THINGS ABOVE." 

Col. iii. 2. 
Oh ! from the world's vile slavery, 
Almighty Saviour set me free ; 
And, as my treasure is above, 
Be there my thoughts, be there my love. 

But oft, alas ! to well I know, 

My thoughts, my love, are fixed below ; 

In every lifeless prayer I find 

The heart unmoved, — the absent mind. 

Oh ! what that frozen heart can move, 
That melts not at the Saviour's love ? 
What can that sluggish spirit raise, 
That will not sing the Saviour's praise ? 

Lord, draw my best affection's hence, 
Above this world of sin and sense ; 
Cause them to soar beyond the skies, 
And rest not till to thee they rise. 

MRS. COTTERILL. 

201 



232. 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

* " LOOKING FOR THAT BLESSED 
HOPE." 

Titus xi. 13. 
How long, Lord our Saviour, 

Wilt thou remain away ? 
Our hearts are growing weary 

Of thy so long delay ; 
O when shall come the moment 

When, brighter far than morn, 
The sunshine of thy glory 

Shall on thy people dawn ? 

How long, O gracious Master, 

Wilt thou thy household leave ? 
So long hast thou now tarried, 

Few thy return believe : 
Immersed in sloth and folly, 

Thy servants, Lord, we see ; 
And few of us stand ready 

With joy to welcome thee. 

How long, Heavenly Bridegroom, 

How long wilt thou delay ! 
And yet how few are grieving 

That thou dost absent stay : 
Thy very bride her portion 

And calling hath forgot, 
And seeks for ease and glory 

Where thou, her Lord, art not. 

O wake thy slumbering virgins ; 

Send forth the solemn cry ; 
Let all thy saints repeat it, 

" The Bridegroom draweth nigh !" 
May all our lamps be burning, 

Our loins well girded be ; 
Each longing heart preparing 

With joy thy face to see.* 

• Hymns for the Poor of the Flock. 
202 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

233. GLORYING IN THE LORD. 

" I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ." — Rom. i. 16. 
Ashamed of Jesus ! Can it be ? 
A feeble child ashamed of thee ! 
Of thee, whom highest angels praise, 
Whose glories shine through endless days ? 

Ashamed of Jesus ! of that Friend 
On whom my hopes of heaven depend ? 
No ! when I blush, be this my shame, 
That I no more revere his name ! 

Ashamed of Jesus ; Yes, I may 
When I've no guilt to wash away, 
No tears to wipe, no good to crave, 
And no immortal soul to save. 

Till then, — nor is the boasting vain, — 
Till then, I'll boast a Saviour slain ! 
And, oh ! may this my portion be, 
That Saviour's not ashamed of me ! 

234. PRAYER FOR THE GUIDANCE OF 

THE HOLY SPIRIT. 
Come, Holy Spirit, heavenly Dove, 
With light and comfort from above; 
Be thou our Guardian, and our Guide, 
O'er every thought and step preside. 

Conduct us safe, conduct us far 
From every sin and hurtful snare ; 
Lead to thy word, that rules must give, 
And teach us lessons how to live. 

Lead us to holiness — the road 
That we must take to dwell with God ; 
Lead us to Christ, the living way, 
Nor let us from his precepts stray. 

Lead us to God, our final rest, 
To be with him for ever blest ; 
Lead us to heaven, the seat of bliss, 
Where pleasure in perfection is. 

203 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

234.* BEFORE READING THE SCRIPTURES. 

Open, Lord, our understanding, 

To receive thy holy word, 
May thy heavenly grace descending, 

Inward light to us afford ; 
Heavenly Teacher, 

May our minds with truth be stored. 

If thy Spirit do not reach us, 
Driving darkness from the heart, 

Vainly friends may strive to teach us, 
Thou alone the Teacher art. 

Heavenly Spirit, 
May it please thee, light impart 

235* HYMN AT DISMISSAL. 

May the grace of Christ our Saviour, 
And the Father's boundless love, 

With the Holy Spirit's favour, 
Rest upon us from above. 

Thus may we abide in union 
With each other and the Lord ; 

And possess, in sweet communion, 
Joys which earth cannot afford. 

236. A CHILD'S PRAYER IN SICKNESS. 

My Father, hear the humble prayer 

In sickness raised to thee, 
Thy word has bid me cast my care 

On him who cares for me. 

A sinful child I know I am, 

But when I suffer pain, 
Thy word directs me to the Lamb 

Who was for sinners slain. 
204 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

O help me, Saviour ! to repose 
On thine own gracious word, 

"All things shall work for good to those 
Who fear and love the Lord." 

If thou shouldst life and health renew, 
And strength to me restore, 

With richer grace my soul endue 
To serve thee evermore. 



237. 



THE ORPHAN'S PRAYER. 



237 



Where shall the child of sorrow find 

A place for calm repose ? 
Thou Father of the fatherless, 

Pity the orphan's woes. 

What friend have I in heaven or earth ? 

What friend to trust but thee ? 
My father's dead, my mother's dead, 

My God, remember me ! 

Thy gracious promise now fulfil, 

And bid my troubles cease ; 
In thee the fatherless shall find 

Rich mercy, grace, and peace. 

I've not a secret care or pain, 

But God that secret knows ; 
Thou Father of the fatherless, 

Pity an orphan's woes. 

THE ORPHAN'S SONG OF 
PRAISE. 
Along life's road no parent's hand 

My homeless footsteps led ; 
No mother's arm in sickness soothed 

And raised my throbbing head. 
But other hearts, Lord, thou hast warmed 

With tenderness benign ; 
And in the stranger's eye I mark 
The tear of pity shine. 

205 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

The stranger's hand by thee is moved 

To be the orphan's stay ; 
And, better far, the stranger's voice 

Hath taught us how to pray. 

Thou putt'st a new song in our mouth. 

A song of praise and joy ; 
may we not our lips alone, 

But hearts, in praise employ ! 

GRAHAME. 



238. 



RESIGNATION. 

" Not my will, but thine be done." 

Father ! whate'er of earthly bliss 

Thy sovereign will denies, 
Accepted at the throne of grace, 

Let this petition rise : — 

Give me a calm, a thankful heart, 

From every murmur free ; 
The blessing of thy grace impart, 

And make me live to thee. 

Let the sweet hope that thou art mine 

My life and death attend, 
Thy presence through my journey shine? 

And crown my journey's end. 



238. 



"THY WILL BE DONE." 



My God ! my Father ! while I stray 
Far from my home, on life's rough way, 
Oh teach me from my heart to say, 

"Thy will be done!" 

If thou shouldst call me to resign 
What most I prize, — it ne'er was mine, 
I only yield thee what was thine : 

" Thy will be done ! r 
206 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

E'en if again I ne'er should see 
The friend more dear than life to me, 
Ere long we both shall be with thee : 

"Thy will be done!" 

Should pining sickness waste away 

My life in premature decay, 

My Father ! still I'll strive to say, 

"Thy will be done!" 

If but my fainting heart be blest 
With thy sweet Spirit for its guest, 
My God ! to thee I leave the rest : 

"Thy will be done!" 

Renew my will from day to day, 
Blend it with thine, and take away 
All that now makes it hard to say, 

"Thy will be done!" 

Then when on earth I breathe no more 
The prayer oft mixed with tears before, 
I'll sing upon a happier shore, 

"Thy will be done !" 



239. 



THE CHRISTIAN'S WISH. 



" Jesus answered and said unto him, if a man love me, he 
will keep my words; and my Father will love him, and 
we will come unto him, and make our abode with him." 
— John xiv. 23. 

Abide with me ! Fast falls the eventide ; 
The darkness thickens : Lord ! with me abide ; 
When other helpers fail, and comforts flee, 
Help of the helpless, abide with me ! 

Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day ; 
Earth's joys grow dim, its glories pass away ; 
Change and decay in all around I see : 
thou who changest not, abide with me ! 

207 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

Not a brief glance I beg, a passing word, 
But as Thou dwelTst with thy disciples, Lord — 
Familiar, condescending, patient, free, 
Come not to sojourn, but abide with me. 

Come not in terrors, as the King of kings, 
But kind and good, with healing in thy wings ; 
Tears for all woes, a heart for every plea ; 
Come, Friend of sinners, thus abide with me ! 

Thou on my head in early youth didst smile, 
And, though rebellious and perverse meanwhile, 
Thou hast not left me, oft as I left Thee : 
On to the close, O Lord ! abide with me ; 

I need thy presence every passing hour, — 
What but Thy grace can foil the tempter's power ? 
Who like Thyself my guide and stay can be ? 
Through cloud and sunshine, abide with me ! 

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless ; 
His have no weight, and tears no bitterness. 
Where is death's sting ? where, grave, thy victory ? 
I triumph still, if Thou abide with me ! 

Reveal Thyself before my closing eyes, 

Shine through the gloom, and point me to the skies : 

Heaven's morning breaks, and earth's vain shadows 

flee ; 
In life, in death, Lord ! abide with me.* 

240. GOD IS EVERYWHERE, BUT HE IS TO 
BE SOUGHT FOR IN SOLITUDE. 

I know that God is everywhere, 

In all I see, in all I hear ; 

He makes the sun his course to know, 

He sends down lightning, rain, and snow ; 

The mighty winds his will obey, 

The rolling ocean owns his sway. 

* The above Hymn was written by the Rev. F. Lyte, Rector 
of Brixham, Devon, before leaving Berry Head, in September, 
1847. He died abroad in the following year. 

208 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

But though the Lord is everywhere, 
In all we see, in all we hear ; 
If I would have him dwell within, 
Cleansing my soul from secret sin, 
Changing to flesh my heart of stone, 
I then must seek him all alone. 

Teach me, O Lord, to seek thy face, 
Grant unto me thy quickening grace ; 
From follies may I turn away, 
And humbly come to thee and pray, 
Bowing the knee before thy throne 
Within my chamber, all alone. 

O Thou ! who the command hast given, 

Thus, thus to seek thy face in heaven, 

Lead on thy feeble child to prove 

The secret of thy wondrous love, 

And make thy power and goodness known, 

When all is still and I'm alone. 



241. 



M. A. STODART. 

A PRAYER FOR GROWTH IN GRACE. 

Mark xi. 12. 

My gracious Lord, I would not be 
Like the unfruitful, barren tree ; 
I would not still from year to year 
Without some sign of grace appear. 

let thy Spirit from on high 
With life divine my soul supply, 
That I, beneath my Father's care, 
May heavenly fruit to Jesus bear ; 

In faith, and love, and knowledge grow. 
With all thy plants of grace below, 
And then from earth to heaven rise 
To bloom and flourish in the skies. 

r 209 



242. 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

THE FLIGHT OF TIME. 



242. 



Swift the moments fly away, 
First the hour, and then the day ; 
Next the week, the month, the year, 
Steal away, and disappear. 

Time is ever on the wing, 
While I speak, or think, or sing ; 
Whether working or at play, 
Time is rolling fast away. 

Think, my soul ! awake and see 
What will soon become of thee ; 
Whither tending, canst thou tell, 
Up to heaven, or down to hell ? 

Jesus, I would humbly pray, 
Guide and keep me in thy way ; 
Every gift and grace bestow, 
Wean my heart from things below. 

HYMN FOR THE NEW YEAR. 



As the winged arrow flies, 
Speedily the mark to find, 

As the lightning from the skies 
Darts, and leaves no trace behind ; 

Swiftly thus our fleeting days 
Bear us down life's rapid stream ; 

Upwards, Lord, our spirits raise, 
All below is but a dream. 

Thanks for mercies past receive. 

Pardon of our sins renew ; 
Teach us henceforth how to live. 

With eternity in view ; 

Bless thy word to young and old, 
Fill us with a Saviour's love ; 

And when life's short tale is told, 
May we dwell with thee above. 
210 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

243. HYMN FOR EASTER. 

"The Lord is risen indeed." 

I know that my Redeemer lives ; 
What joy the blest assurance gives ! 
He lives, triumphant o'er the grave ; 
He lives, eternally to save. 
He lives, to still his people's fears ; 
He lives, to wipe away their tears ; 
He lives, to bless them with his love ; 
He lives, to plead for them above. 
He lives, their mansions to prepare ; 
He lives, to bring them safely there ; 
He lives, and whilst he lives I'll sing, 
He lives, my Prophet, Priest and King. 



243 



EASTER. 
HYMN FOR EARLY RISING. 

To a German Air* 

Wake ! the costly hours are fleeting, 

Haste, arise ! 
Haste, and let a joyous greeting 

Quickly rise : 
God to thee an angel sendeth, 
From the blue heaven she descendeth, 

Fresh as May— The new-born day. 
On her head a crown she weareth 

With blessings rife ; 
In her hands a cup she bearetli, 

A cup of life. 
Every drop of its full measure 
Is a pearl of heavenly treasure ; 

Wake, arise — Claim the prize, 
Let some drops in free libation 

First be poured ; 
Poured in lowly adoration 

To thy Lord ; 
To Him who bore such anguish for 
Him who living wat chest o'er thee : 

Wake and raise — Songs of praise. 

p 2 211 



HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

Nature cheerful tasks is plying 

With glad songs ; 
Birds on busy errands flying 

In blithe throngs. 
Angels are at work around thee, 
Ministers of love surround thee ; 

Let thy song — Swell the throng. 

Rise ! for why should sloth imprison 

Or fetter thee ? 
Christ the victor has arisen — 
And thou art free : 
Sin no more can lord it o'er thee, 
He hath burst all fetters for thee : 

Rise, my soul, For Christ has risen. 

Where the watch thou should'st be keeping, 

Child of day ! 
Saints are weeping, sinners sleeping, 

Rise and pray. 
See what night is darkening o'er thee, 
Think what morning lies before thee, 
Child of day — Rise and pray. 

Saviour, rouse me, nerve me, bless me 

With strength divine ! 
Wholly let thy love possess me ; 

Me and mine. 
May each moment soar above, 
Laden with some work of love, 
Till we rise — To thy skies. 

That, thus knit in blessed union 

Lord to thee ! 
Every act may be communion 

Lord with thee ! 
And thy presence ever near me, 
May o'er each temptation cheer me 
Thus to rise — Thus to rise.* 

* Author of "Tales and Sketches of Christian Life." 
212 



PART TV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 



244. 



CHRISTMAS HYMN. 

THE SONG OF THE ANGELS. 

Hark ! the herald angels sing, 

" Glory to the new-born King ; 

Peace on earth, and mercy mild, 

God and sinners reconciled." 

Hark ! the herald angels sing, 
Glory to the new born King. 

Joyful, all ye nations, rise, 
Join the triumph of the skies ; 
Hail the heaven-born Prince of Peace, 
Hail the Sun of Righteousness. 
Hark ! the herald angels sing, 
Glory to the new-born King. 

Light and life to all he brings, 
Risen with healing in his wings : 
Let us all unite to raise, 
Hymns of gratitude and praise. 
Hark ! the herald angels sing, 
Glory to the new-born King. 

Mild he lays his glories by, 
Born that man no more may die : 
Born to raise the sons of earth, 
Born to give them second birth. 
Hark ! the herald angels sing, 
Glory to the new-born King. 



244.* 



• 



A CHILD'S CHRISTMAS HYMN. 

To a German Air. 



The Son of God, to save us, 

Became a little child, 
A child like us, — unlike us, 

Holy and undented : 

213 



HTMNS FOR THE YOUNG. [PART IV. 

His cradle was the manger, 

And lowly was his lot ; 
The world he made despised him, 
His own received him not. 
Lord Jesus, who from pity becam'st a child like me, 
Oh, make me lowly, pure and meek, a holy child like 
thee. 

The lost thou cam'st to ransom 
Met all thy love with pride ; 
And of the few who loved thee, 

All fled, and one denied. 
For all the love thou bor'st them, 

They tortured thee to death ; 
Yet nought but love and pardon 
Breathed in thy dying breath. 
O Jesus, Lamb of God, all this thou didst for me, 
let my heart, let my life be wholly given to thee. 

Once more, Lord, thou comest 

With the crown upon thy brow ; 
And all who now reject thee, 

Trembling, to thee shall bow. 
And all who now confess thee, 
Thou wilt confess thine own, 
Before the holy angels, 
Upon thy glorious throne. 
Jesus, grant me here thy faithful child to be, 
That when thou comest in thy might thy smile may 
rest on me.* 

245. PRAISE TO FATHER, SON, AND SPIRIT. 

We give immortal praise 

To God the Father's love, 
For all our comforts here, 

And better hopes above ; 
He sent his own eternal Son 
To die for sins that man had done. 
* Author of "Tales and Sketches of Christian Life/'' 
214 



PART IV.] HYMNS FOR THE YOUNG. 

To God the Son belongs 

Immortal glory too, 
Who bought us with his blood 

From everlasting woe ; 
And now he lives, and now he reigns, 
And sees the fruit of all his pains. 

To God the Spirit's name 

Immortal worship give, 
Whose new-creating power 

Makes the dead sinner live ; 
His work completes the great design, 

And fills the soul with joy divine. 

Almighty God, to thee 
Be endless honours done, 

The undivided Three, 
And the mysterious One ; 

When reason fails with all her powers, 

Then faith prevails and love adores. 



END OF PART IV. 



21o 



PART FIFTH. 
POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 



246. 



THE CAMEL. 



Camel, thou art good and mild, 
Docile as a little child ; 
Thou wast made for usefulness, 
Man to comfort and to bless : 
Thou dost clothe him ; thou dost feed : 
Thou dost lend to him thy speed ; 
And through wilds of trackless sand 
In the hot Arabian land, 
Where no rock its shadow throws ; 
Where no pleasant water flows ; 
Where the hot air is not stirred 
By the wing of singing bird, 
There thou goest, untired and meek, 
Day by day, and week by week, 
With thy load of precious things, 
Silks for merchants, gold for kings; 
Pearls of Ormuz,* riches rare, 
Damascenet and Indian ware ; 
Bale on bale, and heap on heap, 
Freighted like a costly ship .J 

* Ormuz, a gulf in Asia, noted for its pearl fishery. 

f Damascene goods, from Damascus in Syria. 

J The Arabs call the Camel "the Ship of the Desert." 

216 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

And when week by week is gone, 

And the traveller journeys on 

Feebly ; when his strength is fled, 

And his hope and heart seem dead, 

Camel, thou dost turn thine eye 

On him kindly, soothingly, 

As if thou wouldst cheering say, 

u Journey on for this one day ; 

Do not let thy heart despond, 

There is water yet beyond! 

I can scent it in the air, 

Do not let thy heart despair !" 

And thou guid'st the traveller there. 

Camel, thou art good and mild, 

Docile as a little child ; 

Thou wast made for usefulness, 

Man to comfort and to bless ; 

And the desert wastes must be 

Untracked regions but for thee ! 

MARY HOWITT, 



247. 



THE PET LAMB. 



The dew was falling fast, the stars began to blink ; 
I heard a voice; it said, "Drink, pretty creature, 

drink f 
And looking o'er the edge, before me I espied 
A snow-white mountain lamb, with a maiden at its side. 

No other sheep were near, the lamb was all alone, 
And by a slender cord was tethered to a stone ; 
With one knee on the grass did the little maiden 

kneel, 
While to that mountain lamb she gave its evening 

meal. 

The lamb, while from her hand he thus his supper took, 
Seemed to feast with head and ears, and his tail with 

pleasure shook ; 
But now, with empty can, the maiden turned away, 
Yet ere ten yards were gone, her footsteps did she stay : 

217 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

"What ails thee, young one ? what ? why pull so at 

the cord ? 
It is not well with thee ? well both for bed and board ? 
Thy plot of grass is soft, and green as grass can be ; 
Best, little young one, rest; what is't that aileth 

thee? 

"What is it thou wouldst seek? hast thou forgot the 

day 
When my father found thee first in places far away ? 
Many flocks were on the hills, but thou wert owned 

by none, 
And thy mother from thy side for evermore was 

gone. 

" He took thee in his arms, and in pity brought thee 

home ; 
A happy day for thee ! then whither wouldst thou 

roam? 
A faithful nurse thou hast : the dam that did thee 

yean, 
Upon the mountain tops, no kinder could have been. 

"Thou know'st that, twice a day, I have brought 

thee in this can 
Fresh water from the brook, as clear as ever ran ; 
And twice in the day, when the ground is wet with 

dew, 
I bring thee draughts of milk — warm milk it is, and 

new. 

" Thy limbs will shortly be twice as stout as they 

are now, 
Then I'll yoke thee to my cart, like a pony in the 

plough, 
My playmate thou shalt be, and when the wind is 

cold, 
Our hearth shall be thy bed, our house shall be thy 

fold. 
218 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

"Alas! the mountain tops, that look so bright and 

fair, 
I've heard of fearful winds and darkness that come 

. there ; 
The little brooks that seem all pastime and all play, 
When they are angry, roar, like lions for their prey. 

" Here thou need'st not dread the raven in the sky ; 
Night and day thou art safe, our cottage is hard by. 
Why bleat so after me ? why pull so at thy chain ? 
vSleep — and at the break of day I will come to thee 
again !" 

WORDSWORTH. 

248. THE DOG AND THE WATERLILY. 

NO FABLE 

The noon was shady, and soft airs 

Swept Ouse's silent tide ! 
When, 'scaped from literary cares, 

I wandered on his side. 

My dog, now lost in flags and reeds, 

Now starting into sight, 
Pursued the swallow oe'r the meads 

With scarce a slower flight. 

It was the time when Ouse displayed 

Its lilies newly blown : 
Their beauties I intent surveyed, 

And one I wished my own. 

With cane extended far I sought 

To steer it close to land ; 
But still the prize, though nearly caught, 

Escaped my eager hand. 

Beau marked my unsuccessful pains, 

With fixed considerate face, 
And puzzling set his puppy brains 

To comprehend the case. 

219 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

But with a cherup clear and strong, 

Dispersing all his dream, 
I thence withdrew, and followed long 

The windings of the stream. 

My ramble ended, I returned ; 

Beau trotting on before, 
The floating wreath again discerned, 

And, plunging, left the shore. 

I saw him with that lily cropped, 

Impatient, swim to meet 
My quick approach, and soon he dropped 

The treasure at my feet. 

Charmed with the sight, The world, I cried, 

Shall hear of this thy deed ; 
My dog shall mortify the pride 

Of man's superior breed : 

But chief myself I will enjoin, 

Awake at duty's call, 
To show a love as prompt as thine, 

To Him who gives me all. 

COWPER. 

249. THE BITTEN AND THE FALLING 
LEAVES. 

See the kitten on the wall, 
Sporting with the leaves that fall, 
Withered leaves — one — two — and three— 
From the lofty elder-tree ! 
Through the calm and frosty air 
Of this morning bright and fair, 
Eddying round and round, they sink 
Softly, slowly : one might think, 
From the motions that are made, 
Every little leaf conveyed 
Sylph or fairy hither tending — 
To this lower world descending, 
220 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Each invisible and mute, 
In his wavering parachute. 

But the kitten, how she starts, 

Crouches, stretches, paws and darts 

First at one, and then its fellow, 

Just as light and just as yellow ; 

There are many now — now one — 

Now they stop, and there are none — 

What intenseness of desire 

In her upward eye of fire ! 

With a tiger-leap half-way, 

Now she meets the coming prey ; 

Lets it go as fast, and then 

Has it in her power again : 

Now she works with three or four, 

Like an Indian conjuror ; 

Quick as he in feats of art, 

Far beyond in joy of heart. 

Were her antics played in the eye 

Of a thousand standers by, 

Clapping hands with shout and stare, 

What would little Tabby care 

For the plaudits of the crowd ? 

Over happy to be proud, 

Over wealthy in the treasure 

Of her own exceeding pleasure.* 



250. 



THE FAITHFUL BIRD. 



The greenhouse is my summer seat ; 
My shrubs, displaced from that retreat, 

Enjoyed the open air ; 
Two goldfinches, whose sprightly song 
Had been their mutual solace long, 

Lived happy prisoners there. 

They sang as blithe as finches sing 
That flutter loose on golden wing, 
And frolic where they list ; 

* An Extract. Wordsworth. 

221 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Strangers to liberty, 'tis true, 
But that delight they never knew, 
And therefore never missed. 

But Nature works in every breast, 
With force not easily suppressed ; 

And Dick felt some desires, 
That, after many an effort vain, 
Instructed him at length to gain 

A pass between his wires. 

The open windows seemed t' invite 
The freeman to a farewell flight ; 

But Tom was still confined ; 
And Dick, although his way was clear, 
Was much too generous and sincere 

To leave his friend behind. 

So, settling on his cage, by play, 
And chirp, and kiss, he seemed to say, 

"You must not live alone." 
Nor would he quit that chosen stand, 
Till I, with slow and cautious hand, 

Returned him to his own. 

O ye, who never taste the joys 
Of friendship, satisfied with noise, 

With bustle, dress, and rout ! 
Blush when I tell you how a bird 
A prison with a friend preferred 

To liberty without. 



COWPER. 



251 



THE BIRD IN A CAGE. 



Oh ! who would keep a little bird confined, 

When cowslip-bells are nodding in the wind, 

When every hedge, as with " good-morrow," rings, 

And, heard from wood to wood, the blackbird sings ? 

Oh ! who would keep a little bird confined 

In his cold wiry prison ? — let him fly, 

And hear him sing, "How sweet is liberty !" 

W. L. BOWLES, 

222 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

252. THE BIRD'S NEST. 

It wins my admiration 
To view the structure of that little work, 
A bird's nest. Mark it well within — without 
No tool had he that wrought ; no knife to cut ; 
No nail to fix ; no bodkin to insert ; 
No glue to join ; his little beak was all ; 
And yet how nicely finished ! What nice hand, 
With every implement and means of art, 
And twenty years' apprenticeship to boot, 
Could make me such another ? 



253. 



THE LARK AND NIGHTINGALE. 



The bird that soars on highest wing, 
Builds on the ground her lowly nest ; 

And she that doth most sweetly sing, 
Sings in the shade when all things rest. 

In lark and nightingale we see 

What honour hath humility. 

When Mary chose "the better part," 
She meekly sat at Jesus' feet : 

And Lydia's gently opened heart 

W^as made for God's own temple meet. 

Fairest and best adorned is she, 

Whose clothing is humility. 

MONTGOMERY. 

254, THE LARK. 

{From the French of Mai an.) 

Now all is still around, 
Do you not hear the sound 

Of music in the air ? — 
Tis the melodious note 
Comes gushing from the throat 

Of the gay lark, up there. 

223 



255, 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

She has just taken flight, 
And is springing up the height 

Of the blue cloudless sky ; 
And always as she springs, 
In lively notes she sings 

The praise of Him on high, 

And like the lark, I should, — 
Oh ! how I wish I could ! 

Sing to my Maker's praise. 
And offer unto Him 
As pure and sweet a hymn, 

Now in my infant days. 

Teach me, heavenly King, 
With holy joy to sing 

Thy mercy unto men ; 
And let me, while I live, 
For blessings thou dost give, 

Offer my songs again. 
Yes ! let my young soul be 
Always more near to thee, 

Till, like the lark, I raise 
In the bright realms above, 
With a heart full of love, 

A perfect strain of praise. 

THE REV. J. HEALE. 

THE SWALLOW. 

(From the French of Malan.) 
1 He will be our Guide." — Psa. xlviii. 14. 



Tell me, pretty swallow, tell, 
Now thou art come back to dwell 
In our fields and gardens gay, 
Where thou'st been so long away ? 

Now that gladsome June is come, 
Now thou seek'st thy summer home ; 
But, oh whither didst thou go, 
When our hills were white with snow ? 
224 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Far beyond our keenest view, 
Far beyond the ocean blue, 
Say, who bade thee forward spring, 
On a swift untiring wing ? 

Say what guide so wise and sure, 
Made thy feeble strength endure, 
Till the far-off land was gained 
And thy distant home attained ? 

Say who taught thee when to flee 
Winter's breath, too cold for thee? 
Say who brought thee back to sing, 
Of the sweet return of spring ? 

Ah ! a lesson we should learn, 
In thy lot our own discern ; 
Like thee, passengers below, 
We to distant regions go. 

God alone, whose tender love 
Watches o'er us from above ; 
God alone, who guides thy flight, 
Can conduct our course aright., 

Fly, then, swallow, swiftly fly, 
Seek the warm and sunny sky, 
Glassy lake, and blooming ground, 
Where thy happiness is found. 

On the fleeting wing of time, 
I too seek a happier clime, 
And upheld by love divine, 
Go where joys unclouded shine. 

Far beyond the distant flood, 
Purchase of my Saviour's blood, 
I the glorious land shall see, 
The blessed home prepared for me. 



225 



256. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 



THE SONG OF THE THRUSH. 



At the corner of Wood Street, when day-light 

appears, 
Hangs a thrush that sings loud — it has sung for 

three years : 
Poor Susan has passed by the spot, and has heard 
In the silence of morning the song of the bird. 

'Tis a note of enchantment ; what ails her ? She sees 
A mountain ascending, a vision of trees ; 
Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide, 
And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside. 

Green pastures she views in the midst of the dale, 
Down which she so often has tripped with her pail ; 
And a single small cottage, a nest like a dove's, 
The one only dwelling on earth that she loves. 

She looks, and her heart is in heaven : but they fade, 
The mist and the river, the hill and the shade ; 
The stream will not flow, and the hill will not rise, 
And the colours have all passed away from her eyes. 

WORDSWORTH. 



257. 



LINES TO A SEA BIRD. 



Bird of the stormy wave ! bird of the sea ! 
Wide is thy sweep, and thy course is free : 
Cleaving the blue air, and brushing the foam, 
Air is thy field of sport, ocean thy home. 

Bird of the sea ! I could envy thy wing, 
O'er the blue waters I mark thy glad spring ; 
I see thy strong pinions as onward they glide, 
Dashed by the foam of the white crested tide. 

Bird of the wave ! thou art but for a day, 
Ocean and earth must alike pass away ; 
Why should I see thee with envious eye, 
When my sweep is more wide, and my course is 
more high ? 
226 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Yet if my thoughts on earth's pleasures are bent, 
If my desires in this low world are pent, 
Poor little bird ! I may envy thee still, 
For the end of thy being 'tis thine to fulfil. 

M. A, STODART. 



258. 



THE PATIENT BEE. 

I sat upon a bank and read, 

One morning in the spring ; 
The sun shone bright above my head, 

And sweet the birds did sing : 

And flowers were growing all around, 

Cowslip and primrose fair ; 
And violets thick upon the ground 

Scented the passing air. 

The bees were murmuring busily, 

And hovering all about ; 
I marked one patient little bee, 

As it flew in and out. 

That busy bee might honey get 
From blossoms spreading wide ; 

But there were buds not opened yet, 
And those in vain it tried. 

Away it flew to other flowers,, 

And I sat reading still ; 
How pleasant were those morning hours r 

On that green sunny hill ! 

Beneath the sun the cowslip bells, 

And violets, opened soon ; 
The little bee of which I tell 

Came back again at noon. 

And now the buds gave up their store 

Of sweetness and of food ; 
And cowslip bells, fast closed before, 

With honey-dew were strewed. 

Q 2 227 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

And so, I thought, it is with me, 

When I my Bible read ; 
In many a text I glory see, 

And on its sweetness feed. 

In other texts, I cannot find 

The meaning of the word ; 
Then let me wait with patient mind 

The teaching of the Lord. 

When light from heaven on them shall shine, 

Then they may open too ; 
And I may make the sweetness mine, — 

The hidden treasure view. 

F. R. 

259. THE BUTTERFLY AND THE BEE; 

OR, PATIENT AND STEADY USEFULNESS. 

I saw a sportive butterfly 

Fluttering its plumy wing, 
Rejoicing in the happiness 

Of bright and palmy spring. 
It rested not on fairest flower, 

On leaf of freshest green, 
But where the sunbeam brightest fell, 

Its varying course was seen. 

I turned from it to mark the bee, 

With steady humming flight, 
As if she had a work to do 

Before the coming night. 
She paused upon the sweetest flowers, 

Her trunk the nectar drew, 
And when her little load was made, 

Back to her hive she flew. 

I'd not be like a butterfly, 

Fluttering about the earth, 
Seeking my own amusement, 
In pleasure and in mirth. 
228 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Spring-time and summer pass away, 

Winter will soon be here ; 
I may not waste my precious time : 

The end of time is near. 

For rather, like that patient bee, 

I'd work while called To-day ; 
For daylight, well employed or not, 

Will quickly pass away. 
I'd try to do my Master's work, 

Fixing on him my eye, 
And if to me 'tis Christ to live, 

It will be gain to die. 

M. A. STODART. 



260. 



THE LIMPET. 



In Nature's all-instructive book, 

Where can the eye of reason look, 

And not some useful lesson find 

To guide and fortify the mind ? 

The simple shell on yonder rock 

May seem, perchance, this book to mock : 

Approach it then, and mark its ways, 

And learn the lesson it conveys. 

At distance viewed, it seems to lie 

On its rough bed so carelessly, 

That 'twould an infant's hand obey, 

Stretched forth to seize it in its play ; 

But let that infant's hand draw near, 

It shrinks with quick instinctive fear, 

And clings as close as though the stone 

It rests upon, and it, were one; 

And should the strongest arm endeavour 

The limpet from its rock to sever, 

'Tis seen its loved support to clasp 

With such tenacity of grasp, 

We wonder that such strength should dwell 

In such a small and simple shell, 

229 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART T. 

And is not this a lesson worth 

The study of the sons of earth ? — 

Who need a rock so much as we ? 

Ah! who to such a rock can flee ? 

A rock to strengthen, comfort, aid, 

To guard, to shelter, and to shade ; 

A rock whence fruits celestial grow, 

And whence refreshing waters flow — 

No rock is like this rock of ours ! 

Oh then, if you have learnt your powers 

By a just rule to estimate ; 

If justly you can calculate 

How great your need, your strength how fraiL 

How prone your best resolves to fail, 

When humble caution bids you fear 

A moment of temptation near, 

Let wakeful memory recur 

To this your simple monitor, 

And wisely shun the trial's shock 

By clinging closely to your rock. 

261. INSTINCT AND REASON. 

The Maker and the Lord of all, 
Who gives to men their daily bread ; 
Who marks each little sparrow's fall, 
And watches o'er the infant's head; 

The God who bids the waves retreat, 
Who made the sky, the earth, the sea : 
Spreads for the flock their pasture sweet, 
And guards the portion of the bee. 

For though entwined amid the grass, 
Thyme doth her fragrant sweets exhale ; 
Those spicy leaves the flocks will pass, 
On scentless herbage to regale. 

While bees, that with the faintest streak 
Of early dawn the fields explore, 
Will those rejected blossoms seek, 
And revel in the palmy store, 
230 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

All these their Maker's law fulfil ; 
By instinct led they cannot stray; 
But we, with choice of good and ill, 
Must pray to take the better way. 



262. 



CONTRAST BETWEEN THE SPRING 
AND AUTUMN. 

AN EXTRACT. 



Of the countless living things, 
That with stir of feet and wings, 
(In the sun or under shade, 
Upon bough or grassy blade,) 
And with busy revellings, 
Chirp and song, and murmurings, 
Made this orchard's narrow space, 
And this vale so blithe a place ; 
Multitudes are swept away, 
Never more to breathe the day : 
Some are sleeping ; some in bands 
Travelled into distant lands ; 
Others slunk to moor and wood, 
Far from human neighbourhood ; 
And, among the kinds that keep 
With us closer fellowship, 
With us openly abide, — 
All have laid their mirth aside. 
Where is he, that giddy spright, 
Blue-cap, with his colors bright, 
Who was blest as bird could be, 
Feeding in the apple-tree ; 
Made such wanton spoil and rout, 
Turning blossoms inside-out ; 
Hung with head towards the ground, 
Fluttered, perched, into a round, 
Bound himself, and then unbound ; 
Light of heart, and light of limb, — 
What is now become of him ? 

231 



263. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Lambs, that through the mountains went, 

Frisking, bleating, merriment, 

When the year was in its prime, 

They are sobered by this time. 

If you look to vale and hill, 

If you listen, all is still, 

Save a little neighbouring rill, 

That from out the rocky ground 

Strikes a solitary sound. 

Vainly glitters hill and plain, 

And the air is calm in vain ; 

Vainly morning spreads the lure 

Of a sky serene and pure ; 

Creature none can she decoy 

Into open sign of joy : 

Is it that they have a fear 

Of the dreary season near ? 

Or that other pleasures be 

Sweeter even than gaiety ? 

WORDS WORTH. 

HAPPINESS OF ANIMALS A 
DELIGHTFUL SIGHT. 



The heart is hard in nature, and unfit 
For human fellowship, as being void 
Of sympathy, and therefore dead alike 
To love and friendship both that is not pleased 
With sight of animals enjoying life, 
Nor feels their happiness augment his own. 
The bounding fawn, that darts across the glade 
When none pursues, through mere delight of heart. 
And spirits buoyant with excess of glee ; 
The horse as wanton, and almost as fleet, 
That skims the spacious meadow at full speed, 
Then stops, and snorts, and, throwing high his heels. 
Starts to the voluntary race again. 
These, and a thousand images of bliss, 
With which kind nature graces every scene, 
232 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

When cruel man defeats not his design, 
Impart to the benevolent, who wish 
All that are capable of pleasure pleased, 
A far superior happiness to theirs, 
The comfort of a reasonable joy.* 

COWPER. 

264. THE DEWDROP AND THE SUNBEAM. 

What if the little rain should plead, — 

So small a drop as I 
Can ne'er refresh that thirsty mead, 

I'll tarry in the sky ? 

What if a shining beam of noon 

Should in its fountain stay, 
Because its feeble light alone 

Cannot create a day ? 

Does not each dewdrop help to form 

The cool refreshing shower ? 
And every ray of light to warm 

And beautify the flower ? 

265. THE USE OF FLOWERS. 

" Consider the lilies of the field." — Matt. vi. 28—30. 

God might have bade the earth bring forth 

Enough for great and small, 
The oak-tree and the cedar-tree, 

Without a flower at all. 

He might have made enough, — enough 

For every want of ours, 
For medicine, luxury, and food, 

And yet have made no flowers ! 

Then wherefore, wherefore were they made 

All dyed in rainbow light, 
All fashioned with supremest grace, 

Up-springing day and night ? 

* "The Winter Walk at Noon." 

233 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Springing in valleys green and low, 

And on the mountains high, 
And in the secret wilderness, 

Where no man passeth by. 

Our outward life requires them not ; 

Then wherefore had they birth ? 
To minister delight to man, 

And beautify the earth. 

To comfort man, and whisper hope, 

Whene'er his faith is dim ; 
For God, who formed each beauteous flower, 

Will surely care for him ! 

MARY HOWITT. 



FADING FLOWERS. 



"266. 

IVe been seeking fresh flowers, white, yellow, and 

blue: 
I twined a sweet garland, dear mother, for you ; 
But so bright is the sun, and so hot is the day, 
Only look — my sweet garland is faded away. 
I chose all the flowers that were pretty and sweet, 
I thought you would like it — it lies at your feet. 
You're smiling, mamma, but I almost could cry, 
To think pretty flowers should wither and die. 

I smile, my dear child, for I know it is so, 
The flowers that don't fade, upon earth will not grow ; 
Ourselves are but dwelling in houses of clay, 
And all things around us are going to decay. 
Earth's joys, like her flowers, a little while last, 
We think we possess them, but soon they are past. 

My darling must look for a heavenly home, 
Where sin cannot enter, where death may not come : 
Where all things are joyous, and glorious, and bright, 
For the Glory of God and the Lamb is its light ; 
Where fulness of gladness is beaming around, 
Where joy has no end, and where bliss has no bound. 

M. A. STODART. 

234 



PART V."| POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 



mi. 



THE DAISY. 



What hand but His who arched the skies. 
And pours the day-spring's living flood, 
Wondrous alike in all He tries, 
Could raise the daisy's purple bud : 

Mould its green cup, its wiry stem, 
Its fringed border nicely spin, 
And cut the gold-embossed gem, 
That, set in silver, gleams within : 

And fling it, unrestrained and free, 
O'er hill and dale and desert sod ; 
That man, where'er he walks, may see 
At every step the stamp of God. 

DR. MASON GOOD. 



THE ROSE; 

OR, THE HEART SHOULD BE GIVEN TO THE 
LORD IN EARLY LIFE. 

Go forth, go forth, my child and bring 
A blushing rose of joyous spring ; 
Bring me the flower I love to view, 
All glistening with the early dew. 
From morning meal the child upsprung, 
Light was his step, and glad his song, 
As forth he went to seek the rose, 
The offering which his father chose ; 
He sees one — plucks it — and the flower 
S 'ins doubly sweet in morning hour. 
Why hastes he not his sire to find, 
His sire so gentle, good, and kind ? 

Alas ! the thoughtless idler stands, 
Grasping the rose in eager hands, 

235 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART 

Admires its beauty and its bloom, 
Delighted breathes its rich perfume, 
Forgetful that its beauties pass, 
Even as the dew upon the grass. 

The sun ascends from eastern sky, 
The lark soars joyously on high, 
The little birds, on bough and spray, 
Are carolling their cheerful lay ; 
Far does the thoughtless truant roam, 
And when, at last, he seeks his home, 
He meets his father's eye with dread, 
For lo ! the rose he culled is dead. 

A voice, dear children, speaks from heaven, 
"Let thy young heart to God be given." 
And can you waste your freshest powers, 
Your earliest and your brightest hours ; 
And then, when every joy is o'er, 
When vanity can please no more, 
Your worn-out heart to Jesus bring, 
A worthless, idle offering ? 
List to the words of changeless truth, 
Think on the Lord in days of youth ; 
The rose you yield will bloom more bright, 
And glow at length in realms of light. 



M. A. STODART. 



269. 



THE LAURUSTINUS. 



Fair tree of winter ! fresh and flowering, 
When all around is dead and dry ;. 
Whose ruby buds, though storms are lowering, 
Spread their white blossoms to the sky ; 
Green are thy leaves, more purely green 
Through every changing period seen ; 
And when the gaudy months are past, 
Thy loveliest season is the last. 

MONTGOMERY. 

236 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

270. ON MUNGO PARK'S FINDING A TUFT 

OF GREEN MOSS IN THE 

AFRICAN DESERT. 

" Whatever way I turned, nothing appeared but danger 
and difficulty. I saw myself in the midst of a vast 
wilderness, in the depth of the rainy season, naked 
and alone, surrounded by savage animals, and men 
still more savage. I was five hundred miles from the 
nearest European settlement. At this moment, painful 
as my reflections were, the extraordinary beauty of a 
small moss in fructification irresistibly caught my eye. 
I mention this to show from what trifling circumstances 
the mind will sometimes derive consultation; for, though 
the whole plant was not larger than the top of one of 
my fingers, I could not contemplate the delicate con- 
formation of its roots, leaves, and capsule, without 
admiration. Can that Being, thought I, who planted, 
watered, and brought to perfection, in this obscure part 
of the world, a thing which appears of so small im- 
portance, look with unconcern upon the situation and 
sufferings of creatures formed after his own image? 
Surely not. I started up, and, disregarding both 
hunger and fatigue, travelled forward, assured that 
relief was at hand, and I was not disappointed." — 
Park's " Travels." 

The sun had reached his mid-day height, 
And poured down floods of burning light, 

On Afric's barren land ; 
No cloudy veil obscured the sky, 
And the hot breeze that struggled by- 
Was filled with glowing sand. 

No mighty rock upreared its head 
To bless the wanderer with its shade 

In all the weary plain ; 
No palm-trees with refreshing green 
To glad the dazzled eye were seen, 

But one wide sandy main. 

237 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Dauntless and daring was the mind 
That left all home -born joys behind 

These deserts to explore : 
To trace the mighty Niger's course, 
And find it bubbling from its source, 

In wilds untrod before. 

And, ah ! shall we less daring show, 
Who nobler ends and motives know, 

Than ever heroes dream ; 
Who seek to lead the savage mind 
The precious fountain-head to find, 

Whence flows salvation's stream ? 

Let peril, nakedness, and sword, 
Hot barren sands, and despot's word, 

Our burning zeal oppose ; 
Yet, martyr-like, we'll lift the voice, 
Bidding the wilderness rejoice 

And blossom as the rose. 

Sad, faint, and weary, on the sand 
Our traveller sat him down ; his hand 

Covered his burning head. 
Above, beneath, behind, around, — 
No resting for the eye he found ; 

All nature seemed as dead. 

One tiny tuft of moss alone, 
Mantling with freshest green a stone, 

Fixed his delighted gaze; 
Through bursting tears of joy he smiled, 
And while he raised the tendril wild 

His lips o'erflowed with praise : — 

" Oh ! shall not He who keeps thee green 
Here in the waste, unknown, unseen, 

Thy fellow-exile save ? 
He who commands the dew to feed 
Thy fragile form can surely lead 
Me from a scorching grave !" 
238 



PAST V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUXG. 

The heaven-sent plant new hope inspired. 
New courage all his bosom fired, 

And bore him safe along ; 
Till, with the evening's cooling shade, 
He slept within the verdant glade, 

Lulled by the negro's song. 

Thus we in this world's wilderness, 
Where sin and sorrow, guilt, distress, 

Seem undisturbed to reign, 
May faint because we feel alone, 
With none to strike our favourite tone 

And join our homeward strain. 

Yet, often in the blackest wild 

Of this dark world, some heaven -born child 

Expectant of the skies, 
Amid the low and vicious crowd, 
Or in the dwellings of the proud, 

Meets our admiring eyes. 

From gazing on the tender flower, 
We lift our eyes to Him whose power 

Hath all its beauty given ; 
Who, in this atmosphere of death, 
Hath given it life, and form, and breath , 

And brilliant hues of heaven. 

Our drooping faith, revived by sight, 
Anew her pinion plumes for flight, 

New hope distends the breast ; 
With joy we mount on eagle wing, 
With bolder tone our anthem sing, 

And seek the pilgrim's rest. 

"SOXGS OF ZION," REV. R. M. M'CIIEYNE. 



271. 



GOD THE AUTHOR OF NATURE. 



Tiikre lives and works 
A soul in all things, and that soul is God. 
The beauties of the wilderness are his, 
That make so gay the solitary place 

239 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Where no eye sees them. And the fairer forms 

That cultivation glories in are his. 

He sets the bright procession on its way, 

And marshals all the order of the year ; 

He marks the bounds which winter may not pass, 

And blunts its pointed fury ; in its case, 

Russet and rude, folds up the tender germ, 

Uninjured, with inimitable art ; 

And ere one flowery season fades and dies, 

Designs the blooming wonders of the next. 

The Lord of all, himself through all diffused, 

Sustains, and is the life of all that lives. 

Nature is but a name for an effect 

Whose cause is God. One Spirit — his 

Who wore the plaited thorns with bleeding brows, 

Rules universal nature ! Not a flower 

But shows some touch, in freckle, streak, or stain, 

Of his unrivalled pencil. He inspires 

Their balmy odours, and imparts their hues, 

And bathes their eyes with nectar, and includes 

In grains as countless as the sea-side sands, 

The forms with which he sprinkles all the earth. 

Happy who walks with him ! whom what he finds 

Of flavour or of scent, in fruit or flower, 

Or what he views of beautiful or grand 

In nature, from the broad majestic oak 

To the green blade that twinkles in the sun, 

Prompts with remembrance of a present God ! 

His presence, who made all so fair, perceived, 

Makes all still fairer. 

COWPER. 

272. NATURE NOT A SELF-ACTING 
INSTRUMENT. 

So soberly and softly 

The seasons tread their round, — 
So sure the seeds of Autumn 

In Spring will clothe the ground. 
240 



PAST V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Amid their measured music 
What wakeful ear can hear 

God's voice amidst the garden ? 
Yet hush ! for He is here ! 

No mere machine is Nature, 

Wound up and left to play ; 
No wind-harp swept at random 

By airs that idly stray ; 
A spirit sways the music, 

A hand is on the chords : 
O bow your head and listen — 

That hand it is the Lord's.* 



273. 



THE STREAMLET. 



I saw a little streamlet flow 

Along a peaceful vale ; 
A thread of silver, soft and slow, 

It wandered down the dale : 
Just to do good it seemed to move. 
Directed by the hand of Love. 

The valley smiled in living green ; 

A tree, which near it gave 
From noon-tide heat a friendly screen, 

Drank of its limpid wave : 
The swallow brushed it with her wing. 
And followed its meandering. 

But not alone to plant and bird 

That little stream was known, 
Its gentle murmur far was heard, 

A friend's familiar tone. 
It glided by the cotter's door. 
It blessed the labours of the poor. 

By the Author of "Tales and Sketches of Christian Life. 
R 241 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

And would that I could thus be found, 
While travelling life's brief way, 

A humble friend to all around, 
Where'er ray footsteps stray. 

Like that pure stream with tranquil breast, 

Like it, still blessing, and still blest. 

If. A. STODART. 

[The idea in the above little piece is taken from a 
beautiful passage in the Rev. Legh Richmond's tract, 
" Little Jane."] 

274. POWER AND GENTLENESS; OR, THE 
CATARACT AND THE STREAMLET. 

Noble the mountain stream, 
Bursting in grandeur from its vantage-ground ; 

Glory is in its gleam 
Of brightness — thunder in its deafening sound ! 

Mark how its foaming spray, 
Tinged by the sunbeams with reflected dies, 

Mimics the bow of day, 
Arching in majesty the vaulted skies. 

Thence, in summer shower, 
Steeping the rocks around. tell me where 

Could majesty and power 
Be clothed in forms more beautifully fair ? 

Yet lovelier in my view 
The streamlet, flowing silently serene ; 

Traced by the brighter hue, 
And livelier growth it gives — itself unseen ! 

It flows through flowery meads, 
Gladdening the herds which on its margin browse ; 

Its quiet beauty feeds 
The alders that o'ershade it with their boughs. 

Gently it murmurs by 

The village church-yard— its low plaintive tone 

A dirge-like melody, 
For worth and beauty modest as its own. 
242 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

More gaily now it sweeps 
By the small school-house, in the sunshine bright. 

And o'er the pebbles leaps, 
Like happy hearts by holiday made light. 

May not its course express, 
In characters which u they who run may read," 

The charms of gentleness, 
Were but its still small voice allowed to plead ? 

What are the trophies gained 
By power, alone, with all its noise and strife, 

To that meek wreath unstained, 
Won by the charities that gladden life ? 

Niagara's streams might fail, 
And human happiness be undisturbed ; 

But Egypt would turn pale, 
Were her still Nile's o'erflowing bounty curbed ! 

BARTON. 



275. 



THE WATER-SPRING. 

Beneath a green bank glistening, 
Bubbles up a sparkling spring, 
Daisies, cowslips, violets creep 
Gently up that mossy steep : 
There, the maiden fills her can, 
Thither turns the wearied man, 
And th' impatient schoolboy knows 
Where that limpid water flows. 

Yet when summer's sun is high, 
Oft that little spring is dry, 
And the circling flowerets fade. 
And the grass is parched and dead ; 
Then the maid her footstep turns, 
And the wearied traveller mourn-. 
While the boy, his search in vaii:. 
Hies him to his sport again. 

R 2 24;; 



276. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Whither tends my simple tale ? 
There is a spring which cannot fail ; 
Spring of happiness unknown, 
Flowing from th' Almighty's throne : 
Lord ! to me that water give, 
May I drink of it and live ! 
In my heart, let it be 
Rising through eternity ! 

M. A. STODDART. 

FOUNTAIN OF SILOAM. 



Beneath Moriah's rocky side 

A gentle fountain springs, 
Silent and soft its waters glide, 

Like the peace the spirit brings. 

The thirsty Arab stoops to drink 

Of the cool and quiet wave ; 
And the thirsty spirit stops to think 

Of Him who came to save. 

Siloam is the fountain's name, 
It means " One sent from God ;" 

And thus the holy Saviour's fame 
It gently spreads abroad. 

grant that I, like this sweet well, 

May Jesus' image bear, 
And spend my life, my all, to tell 

How full his mercies are. 

" SONGS OF ZION," BY THE REV. R. ML M'CHEYNE. 

277. THE SCOTCH PASTOR'S REFLECTIONS 
ON VISITING THE SEA OF GALILEE. 

How pleasant to me thy deep blue wave, 

O Sea of Galilee ! 
For the glorious One who came to save, 

Hath often stood by thee. 
244 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Fair are the lakes in the land I love, 
Where pine and heather grow, 

But thou hast loveliness far above 
What nature can bestow. 

It is not that the wild gazelle, 
Conies down to drink thy tide, 

But He that was pierced to save from hell, 
Oft wandered by thy side. 

It is not that the fig-tree grows, 

And palms in thy soft air, 
But that Sharon's fair and bleeding rose 

Once shed its fragrance there. 

Graceful around thee the mountains meet, 

Thou fair reposing sea ! 
But, ah ! far more, the beautiful feet 

Of Jesus walked o'er thee. 

Those days are past : Chorazin ! where ? 

Bethsaida ! where art thou ? 
His tent the wild Arab pitches there, 

The wild reeds shade thy brow. 

Tell me, ye mouldering ruins, tell, 

Was the Saviour's city here ? 
Lifted to heaven, has it sunk to hell, 

With none to shed a tear ? 

O would my flock from thee might learn 

How days of grace will flee ; 
How all, an offered Christ who spurn, 

Shall mourn, at last, like thee. 

And was it beside this very sea, 

The new-risen Saviour said 
Three times to Peter — Lovest thou me ? 

My sheep and lambs then feed. 
Oh, Saviour, gone to God's right hand, 

Yet the same Saviour still ; 
Graven on thy heart is this lovely strand, 

And every fragrant hill. 

24o 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Oh grant me, Lord ! by this sacred wave, 

Threefold thy love divine, 
That I may feed, till I find my grave, 

Thy flock, — both thine and mine. 

" SONGS OF ZION," BY THE REV. R. M. M'CHEYNE. 

278. RIVERS; OR, THE VALUE OF TIME. 

A COMPARISON. 

The lapse of time and rivers is the same, 

Both speed their journey with a restless stream : 

The silent pace with which they steal away, 

No wealth can bribe, nor prayers persuade to stay ; 

Alike irrevocable both when past, 

And a wide ocean swallows both at last. 

Though each resemble each in every part, 

A difference strikes at length the musing heart : 

Streams never flow in vain : where streams abound, 

How laughs the land with various plenty crowned ! 

But time, that should enrich the nobler mind, 

Neglected, leaves a weary waste behind. 

COWPER. 



279. 



THE ISLE IN THE OCEAN; OR, THE 
LIFE OF MAN. 

A COMPARISON. 

Opening the map of God's extensive plan, 
We find a little isle, — this life of man ; 
Eternity's unknown expanse appears, 
Circling around, and limiting his years. 
The busy race examine and explore 
Each creek and cavern of the dangerous shore; 
With care collect what in their eyes excels, 
Some shining pebbles, and some weeds and shells ; 
Thus laden, dream that they are rich and great, 
And happiest he that groans beneath his weight. 
The waves o'ertake them in their serious play, 
And every hour sweeps multitudes away ; 
246 



PART V.] POETRY FOR TIIE YOUNG. 

They shriek and sink — survivors start and weep, 
Pursue their sport, and follow to the deep. 
A few forsake the throng ; with lifted eyes 
Ask wealth of heaven, and gain a real prize, — 
Truth, wisdom, grace, and peace like that above, 
Sealed with his signet, whom they serve and love ; 
Scorned by the rest, with patient hope they wait 
A kind release from their imperfect state, 
And unregretted are soon snatched away 
From scenes of sorrow into glorious day. 

COWPER. 



280. 



THE EARTH. 



I stood upon a place called Earth, 
Of mountains, valleys, rivers fair, 
And oceans wound themselves around, 
And gorgeous cities glittered there ; 
And scatered, devious, far and wide, 
I marked the humble cottage side. 

And there I saw amidst the crowd, 
A thing called Man, elate and proud, 

The insect of a feverish day, — 
In chase of beauty, fortune power, 
Anguished or raptured for an hour 

With toys that bloom and pass away ! 
And there I saw, depressed and base, 
The losers in that feverish chase. 

And there I met the breaking heart, 
And there I saw the troubled eye ; 
And there was sin's envenomed dart. 
And there did hope extinguished sigh : 
And there were tears, and there was blood, 
There was the recreant from his God. 



Sad gave my heart the burst 
And pity burnt upon my brc 



■sting tear 
*ow, 

247 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

When suddenly was glowing there 
Heaven's peaceful, radiant, promised bow : 
And where that bow its brightness poured, 
I saw the mourners of the Lord. 

They mourned, but not as others mourn ; 
They mourned for sin's defiling power, — 
They mourned for ruined man, the slave 
Of sin, in dark rebellion's hour : 
The contrite mourners they of God, 
Who grateful kissed his chastening rod. 

Their joy, no flower of earthly bloom ; 
Their love, no lying radiance dim ; 
Their triumph, victory o'er the tomb ; 
Their anthem high acclaim to Him, 
From sin who washed them in his blood ! 
Their brother man — the Lord their God. 



c. s. 



281. 



THE VEIL OF MIST. 



"All things shall work together for good to them that 
love God/* — Romans viii. 28. 

Yes — "all shall work for good" — to them that love, 
Whose heart, whose hope, whose treasure is above ; 
All, all shall work for good — here take thy stand, 
And from this hill of promise view the land. 
What though a veil of mist the prospect shroud, 
What though no eye of sense can pierce the cloud. 
Faith sees it tinted with celestial hues ; 
And bright with love that silvery veil she views ; 
She knows the Sun of Glory sheds the light, 
Nor asks a clearer or a lovelier sight. 
Sweetly she learns to wait, to trust, to love, 
Till heavenly breezes shall the cloud remove ; 
And as they waft the rolling mist away, 
She seeks for grace to follow and obey. 

M**M. 

248 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

282. THE HEAVENLY SHOWER. 

"My word shall not return unto Me void." 
Isaiah lv. 10, 11. 

Lord ! as the rain comes down from heaven, — the rain 

Which waters earth, nor thence returns again, 

But makes the tree to bud, the grass to spring, 

And feeds and gladdens every living thing, — 

So may thy word upon a world destroyed, 

Come down in blessing, and return not void ; 

So may it come in universal showers, 

And fill earth's dreariest wilderness with flowers, 

— With flowers of promise, fill the world within 

Man's heart, laid waste and desolate by sin. 

Where thorns and thistles curse the infested ground, 

Let the rich fruits of righteousness abound ; 

And trees of life, for ever fresh and green, 

Flourish, where trees of death alone have been ; 

Let Truth look down from heaven, Hope soar above, 

Justice and Mercy kiss, Faith work by Love ; 

Nations new-born their fathers' idols spurn ; 

The ransomed of the Lord with songs return ; 

Heralds the year of jubilee proclaim ; 

Bow every knee at the Redeemer's name ; 

O'er lands with darkness, thraldom, guilt, o'erspread. 

In light, joy, freedom, be the Spirit shed ; 

Speak thou the word: to Satan's power say, Cl Cease," 

But to a world of pardoned sinners, "Peace." 

Thus, in thy grace, Lord God, thyself make 

known ; 
Then shall all tongues confess thee God alone. 

MONTGOMERY. 

283. THE RAINBOW, THE TOKEN 

OF PEACE. 

When the glorious sun is beaming 

On the shower from on high, 
And the radiant bow is streaming 

All across the clouded sky ; 

249 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Then how beautifully blending 

Are the several colours seen, 
On the drops of rain descending ; 

Red and orange, yellow, green, 
Violet, indigo and blue, 
Shine to prove that God is true. 

By that bow, the Lord is speaking 

To the people of his love ; 
To the children who are seeking 

Grace to dwell with him above ; 
It declares, while God in measure 

Gives to us the needed rain, 
Floods shall not in his displeasure, 

Now destroy the world again. 
Dearest child, it speaks to you; 
Know that all God says is true. 

When you see the rainbow glowing, 

Think of Him who placed it there, 
As the sign of his bestowing 

Weather seasonable, fair. 
And may He whose mighty power 

Bade the watery torrents cease, 
Smile on you with every shower 

In his covenant of peace. 
Then will mercy prove to you, 
All that Jesus says is true. 

D. A. T. 



284. "THE HEAVENS DECLARE THE 
GLORY OF GOD." 
Psalm xix. 

The spacious firmament on high, 
With all the blue ethereal sky, 
And spangled heavens, a shining frame, 
Their great Original proclaim. 
250 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Th' unwearied sun, from day to day, 
Does his Creator's power display ; 
And publishes to every land 
The work of an Almighty hand. 

Soon as the evening shades prevail, 
The moon takes up the wondrous tale, 
And nightly to the listening earth 
Repeats the story of her birth ; 

While all the stars that round her burn, 
And all the planets in their turn, 
Confirm the tidings as they roll, 
And spread the truth from pole to pole. 

What though in solemn silence all 
Move round this dark terrestrial ball ? 
What though no real voice nor sound 
Amid their radiant orbs be found ? 

In reason's ear they all rejoice, 

And utter forth a glorious voice ; 

For ever singing as they shine — 

< 4 The hand that made us is Divine."— addison. 

JOU. THE SETTING SUN. 

How fine has the day been ! how bright was the sun ! 
How lovely and joyful the course that he run ! 
Though he rose in a mist when his race he begun, 

And there followed some droppings of rain ; 
But now the fair traveller comes to the west, 
His rays are all gold, and his beauties are best, 
He paints the sky gay as he sinks to his rest, 

And foretels a bright rising again. 
Just such is the Christian ; his course he begins 
Like the sun in a mist, while he mourns for his sins, 
And melts into tears ; then he breaks out and shines, 

And travels his heavenly way ; 
But when he conies nearer to finish his race, 
Like a fine setting sun, he looks richer in grace, 
And gives a sure hope at the end of his days, 

Of rising in brighter array. 

251 



286. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 



MORNING AND EVENING. 



'• My voice shalt thou heart in the morning, O Lord." 

Psalm v. 3. 
"And Isaac went out to meditate in the field at the 
eventide." — Gen. xxiv. 63. 

My God, all nature owns thy sway ; 
Thou giv'st the night, and thou the day ; 
When all thy loved creation wakes, 
When morning, rich in lustre, breaks, 
And bathes in dew the opening flower, 
To thee we owe her fragrant hour ; 
And when she pours her choral song. 
Her melodies to thee belong. 

Or when, in paler tints arrayed, 
The evening slowly spreads her shade, — 
That soothing shade, that grateful gloom, 
Can, more than day's enlivening bloom, 
Still every fond and vain desire, 
And calmer, purer thoughts inspire ; 
From earth the pensive spirit free, 
And lead the softened heart to thee. 

H. M. WILLIAMS. 



287. 



WINTER. 



White ermine now the mountains wear, 
To shield their naked shoulders bare. 

The dark pine wears the snow, as head 

Of Ethiop doth white turban wear. 

******* 

Hushed is the busy hum of life ; 
'Tis silence in the earth and air. 

From mountains issues the gaunt wolf, 
And from its forest depths the bear. 

Where is the garden's beauty now ! 
The thorn is here ; the rose, oh ! where ? 

The trees, like giant skeletons, 
Wave high their fleshless arms and bare ; 
252 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Or stand like wrestlers, stript and bold, 
And wildest winds to battle dare : 

It seems a thing impossible, 

That Earth its glories should repair ; 

That ever this bleak world again 

Should bright and beauteous mantle wear, 

Or sounds of life again be heard 
In this dull earth and vacant air. 

TRENCH. 

288. SPRING. 

Who was it that so lately said, 
All pulses in thine heart were dead ? 

Old Earth, that now in festal robes, 
Appearest as a bride new wed ? 

Oh ! wrapped so late in winding-sheet, 
Thy winding-sheet, oh ! where is fled ? 

Lo ! 'tis an emerald carpet now, 

Where the young monarch, Spring, may tread ; 

He comes, and a defeated king, 
Old Winter, to the hills is fled. 

The warm wind broke his frosty spear, 
And loosed the helmet from his head ; 

And he weak showers of arrowy sleet 
From his strong-holds has vainly sped. 

All that was sleeping is awake, 
And all is living that was dead. 

Who listens now can hear the streams 
Leap, tinkling, from their pebbly bed, 

Or see them, from their fetters free, 
Like silver snakes the meadows thread. 



The joy, the life, the hope of earth. 
They slept awhile, they were not dead : 



253 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Oh thou, who say'st thy sore heart ne'er 
With verdure can again be spread ; 

O thou, who mournest them that sleep, 
Low lying in an earthly bed ; 

Look out on this reviving world, 
And be new hopes within thee bred. 

TRENCH. 

289. THE AUTUMN. 

(From the French of Malan.) 

" Thou openest thine hand, and satisfiest the desire of 
every living thing." — Psalm cxlv. 16. 

Oh welcome the autumn ! with fruits and with grains, 
Enriched by the God who all nature sustains ; 
Rich clusters of grapes on the vines we behold, 
The apple -tree bends with its burden of gold. 

The leaves are all gilded on each little spray, 
And earth has put on her most brilliant array : 
In the distance, like clouds, the blue mountains are 

seen, 
The flocks and the herds now repose on the green. 

On the breast of the lake the boat glides along. 
While borne on the breeze is the fisherman's song : 
Hark! there in the brushwood the rustling of 

wings — 
Pursued by the sportsman the partridge upsprings. 

While his flocks in the valley enjoy their repose, 
To labour the husbandman cheerfully goes ; 
With his good team of oxen the toil still he shares, 
And follows the plough, and the furrow prepares. 

The noise of the uplifted flail we can hear, 
As with regular fall it resounds on our ear, — 
Let us haste to the barn the corn to survey, 
And see how the wind wafts the light chaff away. 
254 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Our God, ever faithful, thus opens his hand. 
And pours out his bountiful gifts on our land ; 
His blessing it is makes the earth to abound, 
By Him, too, the husbandman's labours are crowned, 

His power preserves all the seed that we sow, 
He blesses the labour and care we bestow ; 
While for each little bird his good providence cares, 
And on the wild hedges its nurture prepares. 

Our merciful Father ! so gracious and kind, 
May He in our bosoms deep gratitude find : 
May the joy of the harvest our praises inspire, 
And to far higher bliss may each heart still aspire. 

For what is this gladness compared with the joy, 
The gifts which above shall our praises employ ? 
Oh, what is this earth, though adorned by his hand, 
To our glorious home in Emanuel's land ! 

H * * M. 

290. THE WAY TO POSSESS REAL PROPERTY 

AND TO ENJOY THE BEAUTY 

OF NATURE. 

Ah ! that such beauty varying in the light 
Of living nature, cannot be portrayed 
By words, nor by the pencil's silent skill, 
But is the property of him alone 
Who hath beheld it, noted it with care, 
And in his mind recorded it with love ! 

WORDSWORTH. 

He looks abroad into the varied held 
Of nature, and though poor, perhaps, compa 
With those whose mansions glitter in his sight, 
Calls the delightful scenery all his own. 
His are the mountains, and the valleys his. 
And the resplendent rivers. His t' enjoy 
With a propriety that none can feel, 
But who, with filial confidence inspired. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Can lift to heaven an unpresumptuous eye, 
And smiling say, — " My Father made them all." 
Are they not his by a peculiar right, 
And by an emphasis of interest his, 
Whose eye they fill with tears of holy joy, 
Whose heart with praise, and whose exalted mind 
With worthy thoughts of that unwearied love 
That planned, and built, and still upholds a world, 
So clothed with beauty for rebellious man ?• 

291. THE CLOSING YEAR. 

The glories of Summer and Autumn are fled, 
And Winter, stern Winter, has reared his dark head ; 
December is here, and will quickly be past, 
And another short year is finishing fast. 

Another short year ! oh, the sound of its wing 

To my bosom some heart-searching questions should 

bring ; 
Have I sought for the Lord? Do I walk in his 

ways? 
And my thoughts are they hallowed by prayer and 

by praise ? 

The days of the years of my life glide away ; 
May I earnestly labour while yet it is day, 
And, knowing that life must soon come to an end, 
Look to Christ as my Saviour, my Lord, and my 
Friend. 



M. A. STODART. 

THE WINDS. 



292. 

" The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the 
sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and 
whither itgoeth." — John lii. 8. 

We come ! we come ! and ye feel our might, 
As we're hastening on in our boundless flight ; 
And over the mountains, and over the deep, 
Our broad invisible pinions sweep, 

* Oowper's "Task," u The Winter Morning Walk." 
256 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Like the spirit of liberty, wild and free ! 
And ye look on our works, and own 'tis we ; 
Ye call us the Winds ; but can ye tell 
Whither we go, or where we dwell ? 

Ye mark, as we vary our forms of power, 
And fell the forest, or fan the flower, 
When the harebell moves, and the rush is bent, 
When the tower's o'erthrown, and the oak is rent, 
As we waft the bark o'er the slumbering wave, 
Or hurry its crew to a watery grave ; 
And ye say it is we ! but can ye trace 
The wandering winds to their secret place ? 

Our dwelling is in the Almighty's hand ; 
We come and we go at his command ; 
Though joy or sorrow may mark our track, 
His will is our guide, and we look not back : 
And if, in our wrath, ye would us away, 
Or win us in gentlest airs to play, 
Then lift up your hearts to Him who binds, 
Or frees, as he will, the obedient winds ! 

THE VOYAGE OF LIFE. 

Bound on a voyage of awful length, 

And dangers little known, 
A stranger to superior strength, 

Man vainly trusts his own. 

But oars alone can ne'er prevail 

To reach the distant coast ; 
The breath of Heaven must swell the sail, 

Or all the toil is lost. 

COWPEK. 



294. 



THE HEAVENLY BREEZE. 



At anchor laid, remote from home, 
Toiling, I cry, " Sweet Spirit, come ! 

Celestial breeze, no longer stay. 

But fill my sails, and speed my way." 

s 257 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Fain would I mount, fain would I glow, 
And loose my cable from below : 

But I can only spread the sail ; 

Thou, thou must breathe th'auspicious gale. 

295. THE OCEAN. 

Psalm xciii. 3, 4. 

I loye to sit by the side of the shore, 

And watch the green waves in motion, 
I love to listen while loudly they roar, 

And throw their white foam on the ocean j 
Like mountains they rise, and with terrible force, 
Break down on the rock that opposes their course ; 
But they cannot pass over the line of soft sand, 
Which they beat in their fury and wash on the strand. 
For " Thus far and no farther," was His decree, 
Who made of soft sand a strong bar to the sea. 

As proudly their crested heads they raise, 

With impetuous force advancing, 
Their thundering noise but speaks His praise, 

Whose eye over all is glancing, 
The water-floods lift up their voice and rave, 
But mightier He than the mightiest wave, 
For here shall the pride of thy billows be stayed. 
He said to the sea, and the sea obeyed : 
The Lord Jesus it was, whose firm decree 
Thus made of soft sand a strong bar to the sea, 

My Saviour is Lord of that turbulent main, 

In its greatness and grandeur rolling ; 
He can bind it about with an icy chain, 

Its rage and its rest controlling ; 
He walks on the waters, he says to the deep, 
"Be still" — and the surges in silence sleep. 
Then let his high praises my thoughts employ, 
I may sing of his power, and ask with joy, 
What cannot that Saviour accomplish for me, 
Who makes of soft sand a strong bar to the sea ? 

D. A. T, 

253 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 



296. 



THE SEA-SHORE. 



In every object here I see 

Something, Lord, that leads to thee : 
Firm as the rocks thy promise stands, 

Thy mercies countless as the sands, 
Thy love a sea immensely wide, 
Thy grace an overflowing tide. 

In every object here I see 

Something, my heart, that points to thee ; 
Hard as the rocks that bound the strand, 

Unfruitful as the barren sands, 
Deep and deceitful as the ocean, 
And, like the tides, in constant motion, 

Newton. 



297. 



THE LOVE OF GOD COMPARED TO 
THE SEA. 



See, my child, that mighty ocean 
Spread its waters far and wide, 

All its waves in ceaseless motion 
Bearing on the rolling tide ; 

When that mighty deep you view, 

Think of God's great love for you. 

Love that is for ever flowing, 

Pouring mercies all around ; 
Neither change nor limit knowing, 

Broad and deep without a bound. 
When that swelling sea you view, 
Think of God's great love for you. 

Love that pardons your transgressions, 
Love that bears you on its breast ; 

Wafts you safe from all oppressions 
To the land of endless rest. 

With that heaven full in view 

Think of God's great love for you. 

NEWTON. 

s 2 259 



298. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

THE FLOWING TIDE. 
Matt, vii.24. 



Children, who have seen the sea 
Rolling in its majesty, 
Wave on wave, with deafening roar, 
Still advancing on the shore ; 
Tell me, would you build your home 
Where the billows rage and foam ! 
Could you hope, in foolish pride, 
To resist the rolling tide ? 

Every one of you will say, 
" Soon I should be washed away : 
None but fools would build their home 
Where the mighty waters foam." 
Dearest children ! mark me well, 
I have greater things to tell : 
You and I alike must be 
Builders for eternity. 

If we seek our joy on earth, 
Present pleasure, passing mirth ; 
If by our own works is given 
Hope of happiness in heaven, 
Then we build with foolish hands 
On the ev*er-shifting sands, 
And our house will soon be gone, 
For the tide is rolling on. 

Christ, dear children, is the Rock 
That can stand the tempest's shock ; 
Clouds will darken o'er the skies, 
Winds will roar and waves will rise ; 
Seek ye then in Christ your rest, 
Then you will be safe and blest ; 
Safe through all Life's storms will be, 
Blessed throughout eternity. 

M. A. STODART. 

260 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

299. "MY FATHER'S AT THE HELM." 
'Twas when the sea, with awful roar, 

A little bark assailed, 
And pallid fear's distracted power 
O'er each on board prevailed — 

Save one, — the captain's darling child, 

Who stedfast viewed the storm, 
And cheerful with composure smiled 

At danger's threatening form. 

"Why sporting thus," a seaman cried, 

"While terrors overwhelm ?" 
"Why yield to fear ?" the child replied, 

"My Father's at the helm !" 

Christian ! from him be daily taught 

To check thy groundless fear ; 
Think on the wonders he has wrought, 

Jehovah's ever near. 

300. FILEY BRIDGE.*— THE LITTLE BAIT- 

GATHERER. 

On Filey Bridge I sat alone, 

Upon a summer's day, 
Till on that long dark ridge of stone 

The light of evening lay. 

And there was silence all around, 

But for the sea-bird's cry, 
And waves that told with warning sound, 

The flowing tide was nigh. 

They struck and struck, with solemn shock, 

Each louder than the last, 
As on the lonely ridge of rock 

The sea was rising fast. 
Even so, with life's advancing years, 

Returning birthdays come, 
Telling to man's unwilling ears 

That this is not his home. 
* Near Scarborough. 

261 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V- 

"Arise ye, and depart," it cries, 

That voice recurring still ; 
Joyful to those by heaven made wise, — 

Bright hopes their bosoms fill. 

The waves were breaking all in foam, 

In the dark northern bay ; 
The south, between me and my home, 

Smooth as a mirror lay. 

And sunset hues were gleaming bright 

Over the rising sea ; 
So days of age, in heavenly light, 

May sweet and placid be. 

A little lass in wild attire, 

In russet cloak and hood, 
Came onward, softly creeping nigher, 

'Till by my side she stood. 

And then she said, "It's time to go, 

The tide will soon be here." 
Homeward we traced our pathway slow, 

The sea still flowing near. 

She had a basket on her arm, — 

To gather bait she went ; 
A little child, she feared no harm, 

There by her father sent. 

Yet "once," she said, "too long I stayed. 

And high the waters grew." 
"What then ?"— "Oh, I was not afraid, 

I thought my father knew. 

"I thought my father saw me there, 
Would send a boat from shore ; — 

But it grew dark, I did not dare 
To stay there any more. 

"Look at that cliff ; I often knew 

Rabbits run up on high, 
And the sheep climbed and heifers too ; 
And so I thought might I." 
262 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

"Were you not frightened there to pass, 

So steep a way to find ?" 
" Oh no," replied the little lass, 

"I never looked behind." 

And such, I thought, should Christians be, 

In danger not afraid, 
Trusting their Father's eye to see, 

Their Father's hand to aid. 

And when he bids them climb the hill 
That leads them to their home, — 

Then let them say, obedient still, 
" Father to thee I come." 

Nor look behind on evil past, 

But upward, onward gaze ; 
And not a glance be downward cast 

O'er earth's dark, dreary ways. 

There is a rock that safety gives 

To all that seek its side ; 
The Lord of life, to all that lives, 

Saviour, and Friend, and Guide. 

O seek him, then, while storms arise, 

And pathless wilds affright, 
When evening darkens in the skies, — 

He is the way, the light. 

F. R. 

-301. TIIE SIIIP - 

Yon stately ship, so firmly built, 
See how she ploughs the main ; 

The wind is fair, she leaves our sight, — 
Will she return again ? 

She may ; but should these limpid waves 

Which gently kiss the shore, 
In wild commotion heave and rage, 

She may return no more. 

261 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

She may ; but should the angry waves 

Dash her on rocky coast : 
Ah ! then her timbers crash, she sinks. 

She can't return, she's lost ! 

Whene'er I see a ship return. 

Or mariner on shore, 
What should I think, what should I do, 

But God supreme adore ? 

He caused the wind to waft the ship 

To regions far away ; 
He caused the winds to bring her back, 

And anchor in the bay. 

He gave the sailors health and strength 

Their duties to discharge ; 
Oh, that He in his mercy may 

Their hearts with grace enlarge ! 



301.* 



THE SHIP. 



Heaven speed the canvass, gallantly unfurled, 
To furnish and accommodate a world, — 
To give the pole the produce of the sun, 
And knit the unsocial climates into one. 
Soft airs and gentle heavings of the wave, 
Impel the fleet whose errand is to save, 
To succour wasted regions, and replace 
The smile of Opulence on Sorrow's face. 
Let nothing adverse, nothing unforeseen, 
Impede the bark that ploughs the deep serene, 
Charged with a freight transcending in its worth, 
The gems of India, Nature's rarest birth, 
That flies like Gabriel on his Lord's commands, 
A herald of God's love to pagan lands. 

COWPER. 

264 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

302. THE LIFE-BOAT. 

Man the life-boat ! man the life-boat ! 

Hearts of oak, your succour lend ; 
See, the shattered vessel staggers : 

Quick, oh quick ! assistance send. 

See the ark of refuge launching, 
See her hardy crew prepare 

For the dangerous work of mercy — 
Gallant British hearts are there. 

Now the fragile boat is hanging 
On the billows' feathery height, 

Now, 'midst fearful depths descending, 
While we sicken at the sight. 

Courage ! courage ! she's in safety ; 

See again her buoyant form ! 
By His gracious hand uplifted 

Who controls the raging storm. 

With her precious cargo freighted, 
Now the life -boat nears the shore ; 

Parents, brethren, friends embracing 
Those they thought to see no more. 

Blessings on the dauntless spirits 
Dangers thus who nobly brave ; 

Ready life and limb to venture, 
So they may a brother save. 

Christian, pause ! and deeply ponder, 
Is there nothing you can do ? 

The sinking ship, the storm, the life-boat. 
Have they not a voice for you ? 

There's a storm, a fearful tempest, 
Souls are sinking to despair ; 

There's a shore of blessed refuge ; 
Try, oh try to guide them there. 



265 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART 

Oh, remember Him who saved you ! 

Whose right hand deliverance wrought, 
Who, from depths of guilt and anguish, 

You to peace and safety brought. 

'Tis His voice now cheers you onward — 
" He that winneth souls is wise :" 

Launch the Gospel's blessed life -boat, 
Venture all to win the prize. 



303. 



THE GOSPEL BANNER. 
Mark xvi. 15. 



If' 



Lift up the Gospel banner, 

Wide be its folds unfurled ; 
Display the love of Jesus 

Before a guilty world ; 
Go forth to every creature 

That dwelleth under heaven, 
Proclaim the wondrous tidings 

Of grace and mercy given. 

O stay not— time is passing ; 

Work while 'tis called to-day ; 
Thousands of heathens perish 

Each hour that you delay ; 
They die without the knowledge 

Of God's most holy word, 
Without the hopes you cherish 

In Christ our gracious Lord. 

Remember your Redeemer, 

Obey his last command, 
And, resting on his promise. 

In faithful service stand ; 
Lift up his glorious banner, 

Grace, mercy, peace, proclaim 
To all repenting sinners, 

In Christ the Saviour's name. 

M. A. STODART. 

266 



PART V."| POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 



304. 



MISSIONS. 



Light for the dreary vales 

Of ice-bound Labrador ! 
Where the frost-king breathes on the slippery sails. 

And the mariner wakes no more ; 
Lift high the lamp that never fails, 

To that dark and sterile shore. 

Light for the forest child ! 
An outcast though he be, 
From the haunts where the sun of his childhood 
smiled, 
And the country of the free ; 
Pour the hope of heaven o'er his desert wild, 
For what home on earth has he ? 

Light on the Hindoo shed ! 

On the maddening idol train ; 
The flame of the suttee is dire and red, 

And the Fakir faints with pain, 
And the dying moan on their cheerless bed, 

By the Ganges laved in vain. 

Light for the Persian sky ! 

The Sophi's wisdom fades, 
And the pearls of Orinus are poor to buy 

Armour when death invades ; 
Hark ! hark ! 'tis the sainted Martyn's sigh 

From Ararat's mournful shades. 

Light for the Burman vales ! 
For the islands of the sea ! 
For the coast where the slave-ship fills its sails 

With sighs of agony, 
And her kidnapped babes the mother wails 
*Neath the lone banana-tree ! 

267 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Light for the ancient race, 

Exiled from Zion's rest ! 
Homeless they roam from place to place, 

Benighted and oppressed ; 
They shudder at Sinai's fearful base ; 

Guide them to Calvary's breast. 

Light for the darkened earth ! 
Ye blessed, its beams who shed ; 
Shrink not, till the day-spring hath its birth, 

Till, wherever the footsteps of man doth tread, 
Salvation's banner spread broadly forth, 

Shall gild the dream of the cradle -bed, 
And clear the tomb 
From its lingering gloom, 
For the aged to rest his weary head. 



305. 



Mrs. Sigourney. 

COMPARISON OF ENGLAND WITH 
OTHER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES. 



I've been roaming, I've been roaming, 

In the pleasant land of France, 
Listening to her minstrel ditties, 

Standing by her merry dance ; 
And I've turned away with sadness, 

From her light and thoughtless lays, 
Longing for my own dear country, 

And the voice of prayer and praise. 

I've been roaming, I've been roaming, 

Pleased through many a Belgic town, 
Gazing on the stately churches, 

Marking each old fortress frown ; 
Then we reached the famous river 

Of the castle and the vine, 
And we bounded o'er the waters 

Of the rapid, kingly Rhine. 
268 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Onward ! onward ! Alpine summits 

Lift their heads towards the sky ; 
We must pierce the clouds above them, 

Commune with the Lord on high ; 
Snows and glaciers stretch around us ; 

Caution ! for the path is steep : 
One false step might hurl you downwards 

Far into the fearful deep. 
Past the Alps the air is balmy, 

Trellised vines and fig-trees grow ; 
Deep blue skies, — Italian sunshine, — 

Oh,' we feel its kindling glow ; 
And I pluck the ancient olive, 

Emblem old of love and peace ; 
But a sorrow gathers o'er me, 

When will Popish thraldom cease ? 
Statues of the Virgin Mary 

Rise around us everywhere ; 
To dead bones are people kneeling, 

Unto stones they lift their prayer ; 
Then I thought of mine own country, 

And I inly blessed the Lord 
I was born in land of Bibles, 

'Mid the teaching of his Word. 
Thus, dear children, I've been roaming, 

Travellers' tales well pleased I tell ; 
But, to good old England coming, 

Thankful thoughts within me swell : 
Sing we then a song of gladness 

Unto God, who placed our birth 
In our highly favoured island, 

Happiest land of all the earth. 

M. A. STODART. 

•306. THE CHRISTIAN CHILD'S GOOD 
WISH FOR IRELAND. 

Oh ! when shall Erin's lovely isle 
In more than nature's beauty smile : 
When to the land's remotest bound 
Shall songs of holy mirth resound ? 

269 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

When shall her mountain glens rejoice 
To hear the Saviour's gracious voice : 
And when her vales, with verdure clad, 
List to the Gospel and be glad ? 
That time shall come — nor distant far, 
Perhaps, those days of blessing are 
When superstition's sable night 
Shall yield to truth's convincing light : 
The blind no longer lead the blind, 
Till both one dreadful ruin find : 
The Bible, freely spread abroad, 
Shall tell the wondrous love of God : 
Praise and salvation, hand in hand, 
Shall walk the borders of our land : 
And sounds of violence no more 
Be heard on Erin's tranquil shore.* 



307. 



ENGLAND. 

My English home ! my English home ! 
O'er land and sea let others roam ; 
I bless my God, who placed my birth 
On the most favoured spot on earth. 

And ask ye why I love the land ? 
Is it because her wide command 
Is owned by all the nations round, 
And felt wherever man is found ? 

Is it because her navies ride 
Triumphant on the foaming tide, 
Thundering where'er her flag is seen, 
That Britain sits as Ocean's Queen. 

Is it because her meanest son 
Is free as king upon his throne ? 
Or is it that the poor man's cause 
Is marked and guarded by her laws ? 
* " Creation.'' 



270 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Is it because her children know 
Home comforts and the fireside glow ? 
The winds may pierce that castle-home,* 
The monarch cannot, dares not come. 

No, not by these — by these alone 
My country to my heart is known ; 
Far greater things God's mighty hand 
Hath poured upon my fatherland. 

I love her on her glorious height, 
The Bible-land, the land of light, 
Sounding the message far and wide, 
That Jesus Christ for sinners died. 

I love the soil her martyrs trod, 
Who suffered for the truth of God ; 
The fire they kindled blazes bright, f 
And none, we trust, can quench its light, 

I love the prayers my fathers felt, 
I love the church in which they knelt ; 
And ask ye now what feelings come 
In thinking of my sea-girt home ? 

For foreign lands let others sigh, 

In England may I live and die ; 

Still praising God, who placed my birth 

On the most favoured spot of earth. 

M. A. STODART. 

307.* LOYAL HYMN. 

Blessings on our youthful Queen ; 
Honour to her rule be shown ; 
Mercy, truth, and right be seen 
Still attendant on her throne. 

* " An Englishman's house is his castle; the winds of 
heaven may beat around it ; all the elements may enter it ; but 
the king cannot, the king dare not." — Lord Chatham. 

f " Be of good comfort, Master Ridley, and play the man ; 
we shall this day light such a candle by God's grace in 
England, as 1 trust in God shall never be put out." — Bishoi- 
Latimer. 

271 



308. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PARTY. 

Long may she with wisdom reign, 
First in worth, as first in power ; 
Ne'er meek charity disdain, 
E'en in glory's giddiest hour. 

Blessings, &c. 
If her foes molest her reign, 
May her arms victorious prove ; 
God of hosts ! indulgent deign 
To defend her from above. 
Peace with all is better far, 
Bind us in the bond of peace, — 
Scatter those that joy in war, 
Bid all angry passions cease. 

Blessings, &c. 
May thy sons in truth excel ; 
Righteousness thy priests adorn ; 
Saints of thy salvation tell, 
Praising Christ, the Saviour born. 
Bless our land with plenteous store, 
Give us hearts of thankfulness ; 
On our Queen thy Spirit pour, 
With thy love her people bless. 

Blessings, &c. 



EXTRACTS FROM A FOREST SCENE 
IN THE DAYS OF WICKLIFFE.* 

A little child she read a book, 
Beside an open door, 
And, as she read page after page, 
She wondered more and more. 

Her little finger carefully 

Went pointing out the place ; 

Her golden locks hung drooping down, 

And shadowed half her face. 

She sat upon a mossy stone, 

An open door beside, 

And round for miles, on every hand, 

Stretched out a forest wide. 
* Wickliffe died in the reign of Richard II., a, d. 1387. 
272 



PART V.] POETRr FOR THE YOUNG. 

The summer sun shone on the to 
The deer lay in the shade ; 
And overhead the sinking birds 
Their pleasant warbling made. 

The butterfly went flitting by, 
The bees were in the flowers ; 
But the little child sate stedfastly, 
As she had sate for hours. 

" Why sit you here, my little maid ?" 
An aged pilgrim spake ; 
The child looked upward from her book, 
Like one but just awake. 

" And what is there within that book 
To win a child like thee ? 
Up ! join thy mates, the merry birds, 
And frolic with the bee." 

; • Xay, sir, I cannot leave this book. 
I love it more than play ; 
I've read all legends, but this one 
Ne'er saw I till this day." 

"Who art thou, child, that thou shouldst read 
A book with mickle heed ? 
Books are for clerks — the king himself 
Hath much ado to read ?" 

"My father is a forester, 

A bowman keen and good ; 

He keeps the deer within their bounds, 

And worketh in the wood." 

•'Who was it taught you thus to read ?" 
" Ah, sir, it was my mother, 
She taught me both to read and spell. 
And so she taught my brother : 

u My brother dwells at Allonby, 
With the good monks alway ; 
And this new book he brought to me, 
But only for one day." 

t 273 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART T- 

"Nay, read to me," the pilgrim said, 
And the little child went on 
To read of Christ, as was set forth 
In the Gospel of St. John. 

On, on she read, and gentle tears 
Adown her cheeks did slide ; 
The pilgrim sate with bended head, 
And he wept at her side. 

" The book it is a blessed book ! 

Its name, what may it be ?" 

She said, "They are the words of Christ 

That I have read to thee." 

"Give me the book, and let me read, 
My soul is strangely stirred ; 
They are such words of love and truth 
As ne'er before I heard !" 

And, ay, he read page after page, 
Page after page he turned ; 
And as he read these blessed words, 
His heart within him burned. 

Still, still the book the old man read, 
As he would ne'er have done ; 
From the hour of noon he read the book, 
Unto the set of sun, 

The little child she brought him out 
A cake of wheaten bread ; 
But it lay unbroke at eventide ; 
Nor did he raise his head. 

Then came the sturdy forester 
Along the homeward track, 
Whistling loud a hunting tune, 
With a slain 'leer at his back. 

Loud greeting gave the forester 
Unto the pilgrim poor : 
The old man rose, with thoughtful brow, 
And entered at the door. 
274 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

The two they set them down to meat, 
And the pilgrim 'gan to tell 
How he had been on Olivet, 
And drank at Jacob's well. 
And then he told how he had knelt 
Where'er our Lord had prayed ; 
How he had in the garden been, 
And the tomb where he was laid ; 

And then he turned unto the book 

And read in English plain, 

How Christ had died on Calvary, — 

How he had risen again. 

And all his comfortable words, 

His deeds of mercy all, 

He read, and of the widow's mite, 

And the poor prodigal. 

As water to the parched vale, 

As to the hungry, bread, 

So fell upon the woodman's soul 

Each word the pilgrim read. 

Thus through the midnight did they read 
Until the dawn of day : 
And then came in the woodman's son, 
To fetch the book away. 

All quick and troubled was his speech. 

His face was pale with dread ; 

For he said the king had made a law 

That the book must not be read. — maryhowitt. 

QHQ THE CHRISTIAN'S CONDUCT UNDER 
U\J&* FALSE REPROACHES. 

Matt. v. 44. 
He loved the world that hated him ; the tear 
That dropped upon his Bible was sincere : 
Assailed by scandal and the tongue of strife. 
His only answer was a blameless life; 
And he that forged, and he that threw, the dart, 
Had each a brother's interest in his heart.— cowpek. 
x 2 275 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 



310. 



THE MARTYRS. 

JOHN HUS3. 

The Saviour stood by him in pain, 

Nor left him in sorrow forlorn ; 
And mitred blasphemers and monarchs in vain 

Heaped on him their hatred and scorn. 
He was meek as the innocent child, 

He was firm as the storm-stricken rock, 
And so humbly he prayed, and so gently he smiled, 

And so sweet were the words that he spoke ; 
That the murderous keepers who guarded their prey 
Could weep for the man they were marshalled to slay. 

b. w. NOEL. 
CRANMER. 

Micah vii. 8. 

Too feebly nerved for so severe a trial, 

Wert thou, O Cranmer ! yet thy heart was true, 

And the Church owes thee much, and loves thee too. 
If thou didst faint beneath the fiercest vial 
That wrath could pour, oh let no harsh decrial 

Tarnish the martyr's fame ! The Saviour knew 

How weak are even the best ! — ere the cock crew, 
Peter thrice uttered the foretold denial ! 
Think not of Cranmer to his chains descending, 

Fear-palsied, and his mind scarce half-awake ; 
But Cranmer, with the faithful Ridley, bending 

Over the liturgy ; Cranmer as he spake 
From his last pulpit ; Cranmer when extending 

His hand through flame, undaunted, at the stake ! 

SIR AUBREY DB VERE. 



311. 



THE YOUTHFUL KING. 

SUGGESTED BY A PIOTUBE OF EDWARD VI. IN HIS 
ROYAL ROBES. 

Monarch, pictured here in state, 
Better honours far were thine, 
Than the grandeur of the great, 
Than the jewels of the mine. 
276 



PART V.] TOETRT FOR THE YOUNG. 

Born to govern and command, 

Thou wast easy of control ; 
With a sceptre in thy hand, 

There was meekness in thy soul. 

Of thy haughty father's frown 

Little on thy brow we trace, 
And that little softened down 

By simplicity and grace. 

Child in age and child in heart, 
Gold, and gems, and bright array 

Could not joy or pride impart, 

Thou hadst treasures more than they. 

More than courtiers, kneeling low ; 

More than flattery's ready smile ; 
More than conquest o'er the foe ; 

More, even more, than England's isle. 

Treasures in which mind hath part, 
Joys that teach the soul to rise ; 

Hopes that can sustain the heart 
When the body droops and dies. 

Therefore, star, thou art not shaded 
By the darkness of the tomb ! 

Royal rose ! thou art not faded, 

In heaven, we trust, thou still dost bloom. 



312. 



THE ENGLISH BIBLE. 

"Oh, how love I thy law." — Psalm oxix. 97. 

Oh, give not up the Bible, 

God's holy Book of Truth ; 
The blessed staff of hoary age, 

The guide of early youth ; 
The lamp that sheds a glorious light 

On, else — a dreary road ! 
The voice that speaks the Saviour's love. 

And leads us home to God. 

277 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Oh, give not up the Bible, 

But spread it far and wide, 
Until its saving voice be heard 

Beyond the rolling tide ; 
Till, in our own beloved land, 

We with one voice and heart 
Resolve that from God's sacred word 

We'll never, never part. 



312. 



"THY WORD IS A LAMP UNTO MY 
FEET, AND A LIGHT UNTO MY PATH." 

What is the world ? A wildering maze 
Where sin has tracked ten thousand ways, 

Her victims to ensnare : 
All broad, and winding, and aslope, 
All tempting with perfidious hope, 

All ending in despair. 

Millions of pilgrims throng those roads, 
Bearing their baubles or their loads 

Down to eternal night ; 
One humble path that never bends, 
Narrow, and rough, and steep, ascends 

From darkness into light. 

Is there a guide to show that path ? 
The Bible — he alone that hath 

The Bible, need not stray ; 
Yet he who hath, and will not give 
That heavenly guide to all that live, 

Himself shall lose the way. 



THE RAGGED SCHOOL. 



313. 

Precept, Psalm lxxxii. 4. Promise, Luke xiv. 14. 
" The word of the Lord endureth for ever/' — 1 Pet. i. 25. 
Hark ! heard ye not that loud and startling shriek ? 

From yonder gallery's crowded rows it came ; 
'Twas long — 'twas fearful — and it seemed to speak. 

A mother's anguish at her offspring's shame ; 

278 



PART V.J POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

u Left to himself/ ' to herd with folly's band, 

The child at home was taught no useful rule ; 
And no kind Christian took him by the hand, 
To guide his footsteps to the " Ragged School." 

Had he been there he might have learned to bend 
The knee in prayer — to shun the haunts of crime, 

And gain the favour of that heavenly Friend 

Who reigns enthroned above the spheres sublime. 

******* 

Christians of Britain ! if ye love your land, 
Your land of freedom, by the truth made free, 

Give of your substance, that each youthful band 
That truth may learn and God's salvation see. 

The band of labourers now, though scant and small* 

To see the first-fruits with delight begin ; 
A time will come, when in the sight of all, 

The glorious harvest shall be gathered in : 
And thousands then in heaven's unclouded calm 

Shall bow to Him who doth all nations rule, 
Strike the sweet harp, and wave the victor's palm, 

And bless the Saviour for the "Ragged School. "* 

j. P. 
THE FATHER AND THE SICK BABE. 

A SCENE IX LONDON. 

A Father — for he bore that sacred name — 
Him saw I, sitting in an open square, 
Upon a corner stone of that low wall, 
Wherein were fixed the iron pales that fenced 
A spacious grass-plot ; there in silence sate 
This one man, with a sickly babe outstretched 
Upon his knee, whom he had thither brought 
For sunshine, and to breathe the fresher air. 
Of those who passed, and me who looked at him, 
He took no heed ; but in his brawny arms 
(The artificer was to the elbow bare, 
And from his work this moment had been stolen), 

* Extract from " A Sketch in Court." By a Barrister. 

279 



314. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

He held the child, and bending over it, 
As if he were afraid both of the sun 
And of the air, which he had come to seek, 
Eyed the poor babe with love unutterable.* 

315. "LOOKING UNTO JESUS." 

" Look unto me, and be ye saved." 
" Pray," said a mother to her dying child, — 
" Pray ;" and in token of assent he smiled. 
Most willing was the spirit ; but so weak 
The failing frame, that he could hardly speak. 
At length he said, "Dear mother, in God's book, 
Is it not written, ' Unto Jesus look ?' 
I can look up — I have no strength for prayer ; 
* Look unto me, and be ye saved' is there." 
" It is, my child, it is ; thus saith the Lord, 
And we may surely, safely trust his word." 
Her son looked up, to Jesus raised his eyes, 
And flew a happy spirit to the skies. 

d. a. t. (A Fact.) 

315.* THE MOTHER'S REMEMBRANCE OF 
A DEPARTED INFANT. 

Oh ! there are recollections 

Eound mothers' hearts that cling, 
That mingle with the tears 
And smiles of after years, 

With oft awakening. 
Thou'lt say, " My first-born blessing ! 

It almost broke my heart, 
When thou wert forced to go; 
And yet, for thee I know, 

'Twas better to depart. 
" God took thee in his mercy, 

A lamb untasked, untried ; 
He fought the fight for thee, 
He won the victory ! 

And thou art sanctified ! 

* Wordsworth. An Extract. 
280 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

" I look around and see 

The evil ways of men, 
And oh ! beloved child ! 
I'm more than reconciled 

To thy departure then. 

" The little arms that clasped me, 

The innocent lips that pressed, 
Would they have been as pure 
Till now, as when of yore 

I lulled thee on my breast ? 

" Now (like a dew-drop shrined 

Within a crystal stone) 
Thou 'rt safe in heaven, my dove ! 
Safe with the Source of love ! 

The everlasting one. 

" And when the hour arrives, 

From flesh that sets me free ; 
Thy spirit may await, 
The first at Heaven's gate, 

To meet and welcome me." an extract. 



316 



THE MOTHERLESS. 
The Motherless ! bend quietly 

Over that little bed, 
And draw the curtains lovingly 

Around that infant head ; 
And smoothe the pillow tenderly, 

The cheek with kisses press, — 
Then bear her on thy heart in prayer. 

For she is motherless. 

The Motherless ! when Christmas 

Hath piled the yule-log high, 
And clustering faces smile around 

The glad hearth merrily ; 
When for the kindly gift ye have 

The fond and warm cart 98, 
Forget not then that lonely one. 

For she is motherless ! 

281 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

The Motherless ! when illness 

Hath blanched the dimpled cheek, 
When on the couch of languishing 

That little one lies weak, 
Then pray that God be near her, 

To strengthen and to bless ; 
And heed her tale of suffering, 

For she is motherless ! 

The Motherless ! when evening 

With the kind " Good night" goes round, 
Breathe in her ear all soothingly, 

The fond parental sound ; 
Tell her that e'en a mother's love 

May learn forgetfulness, 
And speak of the Unchangeable 

To her, the Motherless ! 

MRS. HENRY LYNCH. 



316/ 



MY MOTHER'S BIBLE. 



This book is all that's left me now ! 

Tears will unbidden start — 
With faltering lips and throbbing brow 

I press it to my heart. 
For many generations past, 

Here is our fam'ly tree ; 
My mother's hands this Bible clasped, 

She dying gave it me. 

Ah ! well do I remember those 

Whose names these records bear; 
Who round the hearth-stone used to close 

After the evening prayer, 
And speak of what these pages said 

In tones my heart would thrill ! 
Though they are with the silent dead, 

Here are they living still. 
282 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

My father read this holy book 

To brothers, sisters dear ; 
How calm was then my mother's look, 

Who leaned God's word to hear. 
Her angel face — I see it yet ! 

What thronging memories come ! 
Again that little group is met 

Within the halls of home. 

Thou truest friend man ever knew, 

Thy constancy I've tried ; 
Where all were false I found thee true, 

My counsellor and guide. 
The mines of earth no treasures give 

That could this volume buy ; 
In teaching me the way to live, 

It taught me how to die.* 

GENERAL MORRIS. 



317. 



POWER OF MATERNAL PIETY. 



" When 1 was a little child," said a good old man, "my 
mother used to bid me kneel down beside her, and place 
her hand upon my head, while she prayed. Ere 1 was 
old enough to know her worth, she died, and I was left 
too much to my own guidance. Like others, 1 was in- 
clined to evil passions, but often felt myself checked, and 
as it were drawn back by a soft hand upon my head. 
When a young man, I travelled in foreign lands, and was 
exposed to many temptations; but when I would have 
yielded, that same hand was upon my head, and I was 
saved. I seemed to feel its pressure as in the days of my 
happy infancy, and sometimes there came with it a voice 
in my heart, a voice that must be obeyed, — * 0, do not 
this wickedness, my son, nor sin against thy God.' " 

Why gaze ye on my hoary hairs, 

Ye children young and gay ? 
Your locks, beneath the blast of cares, 

Will bleach as white as they. 

* From the u Dulcimer," New York. 

283 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

I had a mother once, like you, 

Who o'er my pillow hung, 
Kissed from my cheek the briny dew, 

And taught my faltering tongue. 

She, when the nightly couch was spread, 

Would bow my infant knee, 
And place her hand upon my head, 

And, kneeling, pray for me. 

But, then, there came a fearful day ; 

I sought my mother's bed, 
Till harsh hands turn me thence away, 

And told me she was dead. 

I plucked a fair white rose, and stole 

To lay it by her side, 
And thought strange sleep enchained her soul, 

For no fond voice replied. 

That eve, I knelt me down in woe, 

And said a lonely prayer ; 
Yet still my temples seemed to glow 

As if that hand were there. 

Years fled, and left me childhood's joy, 

Gay sports and pastimes dear ; 
I rose a wild and wayward boy, 

Who scorned the curb of fear. 

Fierce passions shook me like a reed ; 

Yet, ere at night I slept, 
That soft hand made my bosom bleed, 

And down I fell, and wept. 

Youth came — the props of virtue reeled, 

But oft, at day's decline, 
A marble touch my brow congealed — 

Blessed mother, was it thine ? 

In foreign lands I travelled wide, 

My pulse was bounding high, 
Vice spread her meshes by my side, 

And pleasure lured my eye ; 

284 



PART V.J POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Yet still that hand, so soft and cold, 

Maintained its mystic sway, 
As when, amid my curls of gold, 

With gentle force it lay. 

And with it breathed a voice of care. 

As from the lowly sod, 
" My son — my only one — beware, 

Nor sin against thy God." . 

That hallowed touch was ne'er forgot T 
And now, though time hath set 

His frosty seal upon my lot, 
These temples feel it yet. 

And if I e'er in heaven appear, 

A mother's holy prayer, 
A mother's hand, and gentle tear, 
That pointed to a Saviour dear, 

Have led the wanderer there. 

Mrs. Sigournei 



318. 



THE PASTOR'S MORNING WALK. 

A TRUE NARRATIVE. 

At early dawn the Pastor rose, 

Securing precious time ; 
He loved to seek his Father's face 

At that "sweet hour of prime." 

A guest in noble halls, he sought 
His Master's claims to prove ; 

And in the humble peasant's ear 
To breathe his Saviour's love. 

Invited by the balmy air, 

Toward the door he went ; 
And on his way a maiden found 

On household cares intent. 
Accosting her, he gently said, 

" Up with the lark I see ; 
And bright and cheerful as the morn. 

And busy as the bee. 



286 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

" Mary, 'tis well; yet, oh, forgive 

An aged pilgrim's word : 
You're early up, and active too, 

But have you fed your bird ?" 

Surprised, the maiden quick replied, 

" Sir, I've no bird to feed." 
1 ' Yes, yes, my child, a wondrous bird, 

Requiring precious seed." 

" Sure, 'tis the bird that master brought 

From countries o'er the sea. 
My lady feeds that bird herself, 

She trusts it not to me." 

" No, 'tis not of your lady's bird, 

But of your own I tell ; 
A greater than your earthly lord 

Has sent it here to dwell. 

" Not in the ocean's fairest isle 

Your treasure had its birth ; 
Nor gems nor gold can tell its price, 

It is of countless worth. 

" Its wings were made for heavenly flight. 

Its notes to pierce the skies, 
Its home is in the Tree of Life ; 

Oh, Mary, guard your prize ! 

" Feed it with manna from the Word, 

Shield it from breath of sin, — 
So shall it warble sweetest notes 

Its earthly cage within. 

"Then when the Master's welcome voice 

Shall bid the prisoner come, 
With songs of everlasting joy 

'Twill soar towards its home. 

" There, in the Paradise of God, 

Where endless pleasures reign, 
Of perfect love and ceaseless praise, 

Join the enraptured strain." 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

The dew still glittered on the grass, 

When the good Pastor found 
A pleasant lad, with honest zeal, 

Weeding the garden ground. 

"Well done, my boy ! I like to see 

Such diligence and care ; 
You love your work, nor will permit 

One weed to nourish there. 

" Sweet are your herbs and fragrant flowers : 

But say, do you succeed 
In keeping your own garden free 

From every noxious weed ? 

" Oh, sir, I'm a poor stranger lad, 

I've not one inch of ground ; 
'Tis the allotment-field you mean, 

Let to the tenants round." 

"No, not of any field I speak, 

With earthly treasure sown ! 
I mean a soil for heavenly fruit, 

Trusted to you alone. 

" Oh, seek for wisdom from on high 

To till that ground aright, — 
And flowers and fruits that never fade, 

Shall cheer your, gladdened sight. 

"Jesus himself shall love to walk 
Those fragrant bowers among, 

And endless joys unspeakable 
Shall with his presence come." 

The aged Pastor turned away, 

Breathing an earnest prayer 
That God would bless his words, and make 

Those youthful souls his care. 

M**M. 



287 



319. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 



THE LABOURER'S RETURN. 



" Better is a dinner of herbs where love is, than a stalled 
ox and hatred therewith." — Prov. xv. 17. 

Why o'er yon peasant's weary, toilworn brow, 
Does the bright gleam of sudden pleasure glow ? 
Why, as yon smoke ascending seeks the sky, 
Does joy light up and glisten in his eye ? 
Ah ! dear to him those airy circles play, 
The charm that lures him on his lonely way : 
No scene so dear as that sequestered spot, 
No palace equal to his humble cot. 
But see ! what playful child, with joyful feet, 
Springs forth, his father's glad return to greet, 
Clings round his knees, and whispers in his ear 
Those gentle words that parents love to hear. 
(Filial affection ! stream of dear delight, 
How pure its early spring, how fresh, how bright ! 
Untroubled yet by sorrow's falling tear, 
By doubt unclouded, and unchecked by fear !) 
'Tis now the father knows his toil is o'er, 
Smiles on his child, and feels fatigued no more. 
With cheerful step he gains the lowly cot, 
And meets the faithful partner of his lot. 
She, as he enters, meets him with a smile ; 
Sweet words of welcome ail his cares beguile ; 
Then turns the frugal supper to prepare, 
Which o'er the hearth suspended, claims her care. 
Meanwhile, the father from the cradle takes 
His smiling babe, whom a fond kiss awakes. 
Then to the hearth he nearer draws his seat, 
One in his arms, the other at his feet. 
The lively babe, with many an artless grace, 
Plays with his locks and strokes his sunburnt face ; 
While the glad mother breathes the silent prayer, 
And feels her all of earthly bliss is there. 
Soon round the board her frugal hand has dressed — 
Hunger their seasoning, sweet content their guest — 
288 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

The happy pair, with grateful hearts, adore 

That bounteous hand which thus had blessed their 

store. 
Pleasant the meal which healthful labour gains, 
Happy the home where sweet affection reigns. 

M**M. 

•319.* HOME. 

" Set your affection on things above." — Col. iii. 2. 

Yes, home is a delightful word ! 

So garlanded around, 
With flowerets wet with morning dew, 

There's magic in the sound. 

Yes, home is a delightful word ! 

Our earthly homes are dear ; 
Cold is the heart that bounds not up 

To feel that home is near. 

Yes, home is a delightful word ! 

The father's fervent prayer, 
The mother's love, the infant's smile, 

The springs of life are there. 

Sweet home ! thou art a precious spot ! 

Yet in thy earthly bower, 
Droops many a sad and anxious heart, 

And many a fading flower. 

The mark of vanity and change 

Is stamped on all below ; 
O'er the fair gardens of our home 

The wintry wind must blow. 

O Saviour ! drawn by boundless grace 

From thy bright home in heaven, 
To lead a pilgrims life on earth ! 

To us may grace be given. 
Thankful for every blessing here 

To fix our hearts above, 
And seek our pure and lasting home, 

The bosom of thy love. m**m. 

u 289 



320. 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART 



THE TRAVELLER'S WELCOME. 



Sweet to the morning traveller, 

The song amid the sky, 
Where, twinkling in the dewy light, 

The skylark soars on high. 

And cheering to the traveller, 
The gales that round him play, 

When faint and heavily he drags 
Along his noontide way. 

And when beneath th' unclouded sun 

Full wearily toils he, 
The flowing water makes to him 

A soothing melody. 

And when the evening light decays, 

And all is calm around, 
There is sweet music to his ear, 

In the distant sheep-bell's sound. 

But oh ! of all delightful sounds 

Of evening or of morn, 
The sweetest is the voice of love 

That welcomes his return. 

SOUTHEY. 

321. CHRISTMAS. 

Welcome, Christmas ! welcome here. 
Happiest season of the year ! 
Fires are blazing thee to greet, 
Families together meet ; 
Brothers, sisters, circle round, 
Loud is laughter's joyous sound ; 
For Old England likes to see 
All her Children welcome thee. 

Welcome, Christmas ! for thy voice 
Calls upon us to rejoice ; 
Not with foolish, idle mirth, 
Born and perishing on earth ; 
290 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Far be the ungrateful thought ! 
Ours are blessings dearly bought ; 
Dearly bought, but freely given, 
By the Lord of earth and heaven. 

Fix we then on Christ our eye; 
May we feel the Saviour nigh ! 
May we meet around the board, 
All rejoicing in the Lord ! 
Be the Babe of Bethlehem near, 
May his smile the season cheer ; 
And each gladdened heart and tongue 
Join the angel's Christmas song ! 

M. A. STODART. 

321.* THE STAR IN THE EAST. 

Brightest and best of the sons of the morning, 
Dawn on our darkness, and lend us thine aid ! 
Star of the East, the horizon adorning, 
Guide where our infant Redeemer is laid ! 

Cold on his cradle the dewdrops are shining, 
Low lies his head with the beasts of the stall; 
Angels adore him, in slumber reclining, 
Maker, and Monarch, and Saviour of all ! 

Say, shall we yield him, in costly devotion, 
Odours of Edom and offerings divine ; 
Gems of the mountain, and pearls of the ocean, 
Myrrh from the forest, and gold from the mine ? 

Vainly we offer each ample oblation, 
Vainly with gold would his favour secure ; 
Richer by far is the heart's adoration, 
Dearer to God are the prayers of the poor. 

heber. 



322. 



THE SUN OF RIGHTEOUSNESS. 



How sweet, dear children, is the light ! 
The sun, how pleasant to the sight ! 
But sweeter, fairer, brighter far, 
Jesus, the glorious Morning Star, 

u 2 ' 291 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

The Sun of righteousness who brings 
Light, life, and healing on his wings. 
Gladly our opening eyes survey 
The beauties of returning day ; 
Oh ! let not then our hearts forget 
That Sun which rose no more to set. 
Once to our guilty world he came 
To bear our sorrow, sin, and shame ; 
Left his eternal, glorious throne, 
That rebels, by themselves undone, 
Might have their many sins forgiven, 
And learn the way to peace and heaven. 
Then did the clouds of anguish roll, 
Like shades of evening, round his soul ; 
Till death came on, like starless night, 
And for a season quenched his light. 
But, see ! He rises from the tomb, 
As breaks the morn on nature's gloom, 
And sends his glorious truth abroad, 
To lead our wandering souls to God. 

FROM "CREATION." 



323. 



THE IMMORTAL SOUL. 



"The grass withereth, and the flower thereof falleth away; 
but the word of the Lord endureth for ever." — 1 Pet. 
i. 24, 25. 

The leaves of autum pass away, 
The summer's brightest flowers decay ; 
The fairest things below the sky 
But bloom awhile, then fade and die ; 
And all of beauty, all of bloom, 
On earth is passing to the tomb. 

But there is something that will live, 
When light no more the sun shall give ; 
When moons no more shall set or rise, 
And stars shall quit the silent skies ; 
And, vanished in eternity, 
Time and this earth shall cease to be. 
292 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

It is the soul, the better part, 

That which is thinking in my heart ; 

Tis that which never can decay, 

Though all things else should pass away ; 

My body in the dust shall lie, 

My soul can never, never die. 

324. THE POWER OF PRAYER 
Psalm xxxiv. 15. 

There is an eye that never sleeps 

Beneath the wing of night ; 
There is an ear that never shuts 

When sink the beams of light. 

There is an arm that never tires 
When human strength gives way ; 

There is a love that never fails 
When earthly loves decay. 

That eye is fixed on seraph throngs ; 

That arm upholds the sky ; 
That ear is filled with angel songs ; 

That love is throned on high. 

But there's a power which man can wield 

When mortal aid is vain, 
That eye, that arm, that love to reach, 

That listening ear to gain. 

That power is prayer, which soars on high. 

Through Jesus to the throne, 
And moves the hand which moves the world, 

To brin£ salvation down. 



325. 



GOD THE HEARER OF PRAYER. 



There is an ear that listening bends 

Ere avo for mercy plead ; 
There is a grace which far transcends 

Our utmost sense of need. 

293 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART 

There is a Friend whose goodness flows, 

Eternal as his throne ; 
Oh ! happy is the heart that knows 

And calls that Friend its own. 



D. A. 



326. 



327. 



294 



PRAYER. 

Go when the morning shineth, 
Go when the noon is bright ; 

Go when the eve declineth, 
Go in the hush of night. 

Go with pure mind and feeling, 
Fling earthly thought away, 

And in thy chamber kneeling, 
Do thou in secret pray. 

Remember all who love thee, 
All who are loved by thee ; 

Pray, too, for those who hate thee, 
If any such there be. 

Then for thyself, in meekness, 

A blessing humbly claim ; 
For strength to aid thy weakness, 

In thy Redeemers name. 

Through him thy secret breathing 
Shall reach the realms above, 

As sacred incense wreathing, 
Where all is truth and love. 

SELF-EXAMINATION. 

Did I this morn devoutly pray 

For God's assistance through the day ? 

And did I read his sacred word 

To make my life therewith accord? 

Did I for any purpose try 

To hide the truth, and tell a lie ? 

Did I my time and thoughts engage 

As fits my duty, station, age ? 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

Did I with care my temper guide, 
Checking ill-humour, anger, pride ? 
Did I my lips from aught refrain 
That might my fellow-creature pain ? 
Did I with cheerful patience bear 
The little ills that all must share ? 
For all God's mercies through this day, 
Did I my grateful tribute pay ? 
And did I, when the day was o'er, 
God's watchful aid again implore ? 



328 



ANGRY WORDS. 

Eph. iv. 31. 
Angry words are lightly spoken 

In a rash and thoughtless hour, 
Brightest links of life are broken 

By their deep insidious power. 

Hearts inspired by warmest feeling, 

Ne'er before by anger stirred, 
Oft are rent past human healing 

By a single angry word. 

Poison -drops of care and sorrow. 

Bitter poison-drops are they, 
Weaving for the coming morrow 

Saddest memories of to-day 

Angry words, — oh ! let them never 
From the tongue unbridled slip ; 

May the Spirit's impulse ever 
Check them ere they soil the lip ! 

Love is much too pure and holy, 

Friendship is too sacred far, 
For a moment's reckless folly 

Thus to desolate and mar. 
Angry words are lightly spoken, 

Bitterest thoughts are rashly stirred ; 
Brightest links of life are broken 

By a single angry word. 

JAMES MIDDLE TON. 

295 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

329. IDOLATRY. 

" Little children, keep yourselves from idols.'' — 
1 John v. 21. 
Whatever passes as a cloud between 
The mental eye of faith and things unseen, 
Causing that brighter world to disappear, 
Or seem less lovely, and its hope less dear ; — 
This is our world, — our idol, though it bear 
Affection's impress, or devotion's air ! 

330. "BE CONTENT WITH SUCH THINGS 

AS YE HAVE." 
Heb. xiii. 5. 
Some murmur, when their sky is clear, 

And wholly bright to view, 
If one small speck of dark appear 
In their great heaven of blue. 

And some with thankful love are filled, 

If but one streak of light, 
One ray of God's good mercy gild 

The darkness of their night. trench. 

331. " THE SERVANT IS NOT GREATER 

THAN HIS LORD." 

John xv. 20. 

Oh can I hope, since Jesus wept, 
No tears mine eyes should dim, 

Or wish a world to smile on me 
That only frown'd on Him ? 

And since his saints in every age 

A thorny path have (rod, 
Oh, who am I that flowers alone 

Should strew my path to God ? 

Can I wish more than that a lot 

Like theirs to me be given : 
A toilsome pilgrimage on earth, — 

Eternal rest in heaven. 

296 REV. HUGH WHITE. 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 



332 



"STRANGERS AND PILGRIMS." 
Heb.xi. 13. 

"Strangers !" "Pilgrims !" Is it so ? 
Are we pilgrims here below ? 
Are our wants and wishes few ? 
Do we live as strangers do ? 
Strange to sinful thoughts and ways, 
Dead to earthly blame or praise, 
"Pressing on" and "passing through," 
"Jesus ever in our view ?" 

" If children, then heirs." — Rom. viii 17. 

"If children, heirs." Transporting thought ! 

From enmity and exile brought. 

A Father's eye to guide our way, 

A Father's arm our steps to stay ; 

A foretaste of Immanuel's love, 

A bright inheritance above, 

Spotless and undefiled and pure, 

For endless ages to endure. m**m. 



333. 



SUFFICIENT UNTO THE DAY IS 
THE EVIL THEREOF." 
Matt. vi. 34. 

Does each day upon the wing, 
Its allotted burden bring ? 
Load it not besides with sorrow 
Which belongeth to the morrow. 
Strength is promised, strength is given. 
When the heart by God is riven. 

But foredate the day of woe, 
And alone thou bear'st the blow ; 
One thing only claims your care, 
Seek thou first, by faith and prayer. 
That all-glorious world above, 
Scene of righteousness and love ; 
And what e'er thou need'st below. 
He thou trust est will bestow* 

29*7 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

334. LO,WE HAVE LEFT ALL, AND HAVE 
FOLLOWED THEE. 
Mark x. 28. 
And hast thou left each darling sin ? 
Oh ! pause thee, look again within ; 
The sumbeam on the lake may glow, 
Yet pierce not to the depth below. 

Look well — is there no earthly care 
Chafing thy trembling soul in prayer ? 
No thoughts that, with their binding chain, 
Would draw thee to the world again ? 

Thy burden thou hast brought of grief, 
And askest of thy Lord relief; 
And then, as if such prayer were vain, 
Thou tak'st the burden up again. 

Help us, O Lord ! in sorrow's hour 
To trust thy mercy and thy power : 
In clouds and tears thy love to see, 
Though all be dark, to follow thee! 

Mrs. Henry Lynch 



335. 



" IT IS I, BE NOT AFRAID." 



Tossed with rough waves, and faint with fear, 
Above the tempest, soft and clear, 
What gentle accents greet my ear, 

" 'Tis I, be not afraid." 

" 'Tis I who washed thy spirit white, 
'Tis I who gave thy blind eyes sight, 
'Tis I, thy Lord, thy life, thy light; 

"Tis I, be not afraid.' 

" These raging winds, this surging sea, 
Bear not a breath of wrath to thee, 
That storm has all been spent on me ; 

< 'Tis I, be not afraid.' 
298 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

" This bitter cup, I drank it first — 
To thee it is no draught accurst, — 
The hand that gives it thee is pierced ; 

"Tis I, be not afraid/ 

:i Mine arms are underneath thy head, 
Mine eyes are watching by thy bed, 
My blessing is around thee shed ; 

"Tis I be not afraid.' " 

When on " the other side" thy feet 
Shall rest, 'mid thousand welcomes sweet, 
One well-known voice thy heart shall greet — 
" 'Tis I, be not afraid." 

And midst the dazzling majesty, 
Gently He'll lay His hand on thee, 
Whispering, "Beloved, lov'st thou me ? 
'Twas not in vain I died for thee ; 

"'Tis I, be not afraid. "* 

336, " O, SEND OUT THY LIGHT AND 

THY TRUTH." 
O thou, whose power o'er moving worlds presides, 
Whose word created, and whose wisdom guides, 
On darkling man in pure effulgence shine, 
And cheer the clouded mind with light divine. 
'Tis thine alone to calm the pious breast 
With silent confidence and holy rest ; 
From thee, great God, we spring, to thee we tend, 
Path, motive, guide, original and end. J 

337. WALKING WITH GOD. 

Col.ii. 6. 
He walks with God who lives a life of faith, 
And builds his hope on what the promise saith ; 
Who letting go this world, the next secures, 
And still, as seeing things unseen, endures. 

* Author of " Tales and Sketches of Christian Life." 
f Said to have been written by King Alfred. 

299 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

He walks with God who lives a life of prayer, 
And daily casts on him his every care ; 
Who in this sweet and sacred converse knows 
The soul's refreshment and the soul's repose. 

He walks with God who, as he onward moves, 
Treads in the footsteps of the Lord he loves ; 
Who, keeping Jesus ever in his view, 
Sees in his Saviour his example too. 

Blest is the child who humbly walks with God, 

And follows in the path by Jesus trod ; 

His way is holiness, his end is peace, 

And glory crowns him when his labours cease. 

D. A. T. 



338. 



COMMUNION WITH GOD. 



When one that holds communion with the skies. 
Has filled his urn where the pure waters rise, 
And once more mingles with us meaner things, 
'Tis e'en as if an angel shook his wings ; 
Immortal fragrance fills the circuit wide, 
And tells us whence his treasures are supplied. 

COWPER. 



339. 



THE CONTENTED PRISONER. 



A little bird I am, 

Shut from the fields of air, 
And in my cage I sit and sing 

To Him who placed me there ; 
Well pleased a prisoner to be, 
Because, my God, it pleases thee. 

Nought have I else to do ; 

I sing the whole day long : 
And He, whom much I love to please, 

Doth listen to my song ; 
He caught and bound my wandering wing, 
But still he bends to hear me sing. 
300 



PART V.] rOETRr FOR THE YOUNG. 

Thou hast an ear to hear, 

A heart to love and bless ; 
And though my notes were e'er so rude. 

Thou wouldst not hear the less : 
Because thou knowest, as they fall, 
That love, sweet love, inspires them all. 

My cage confines me round, 

Abroad I cannot fly ; 
But though my wing is closely bound, 

My heart's at liberty. 
My prison walls cannot control 
The flight, the freedom of the soul. 

Oh ! it is good to soar 

These bolts and bars above, 
To Him whose purpose I adore, 

Whose providence I love ; 
And in thy mighty will to find 
The joy, the freedom of the mind.* 

340. TRUE JOY. 

Ps. iv.6, 7. 

Oh ! could our senseless hearts but know 
The joy God's presence can bestow ; 
The pleasures that are kept in store 
At his right hand for evermore 
For those, who walk before him here 
In fa i tli, and love, and holy fear ; 
Who, by his power and grace renewed, 
Have had their stubborn hearts subdued, 
Washed in the blood that frees from sin, 
And Christ's pure image stamped within ; 
Who, glorying in the Saviour's cross, 
Count all beside bul worthless dross, 
With strong, unshaken faith rely 
On him, to save and justify ; 

* Written by Madame Guvon, during an imprisonment in the 
Bastile. It is suitable to one conlined by lingering sickness. 

301 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

Trust in his righteousness alone, 
And plead it at the Father's throne : 
Could we but know the peace and rest 
With which the child of God is blest ; 
Not gold, nor all the splendid things 
That glitter in the courts of kings, 
Could win our longing souls to stay 
Without his love a single day. 

FROM "CREATION." 



341. 



HAPPINESS. 



Happiness, thou lovely name, 

Where's thy seat, tell me, where ? 

Learning, pleasure, wealth, and fame, 
All cry out, "It is not here :" 

Not the wisdom of the wise 

Can inform me where it lies ; 

Not the grandeur of the great 

Can the bliss I seek create. 

Object of my first desire, 

Jesus, crucified for me ! 
All to happiness aspire, — 

Only to be found in thee ; 
Thee to praise, and thee to know, 
Constitute our bliss below ; 
Thee to see, and thee to love, 
Constitute our bliss above. 

Lord, it is not life to live, 

If thy presence thou deny ; 
Lord, if thou thy presence give, 

'Tis no longer death to die : 
Source and giver of repose, 
Singly from thy smile it flows ; 
Peace and happiness are thine, — 
Mine they are, if thou art mine. 
302 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 

342. "COME UNTO ME." 

I heard the voice of Jesus say, 

Come unto me and rest ; 
Lay down, thou weary one, lay down 

Thy head upon my breast. 
I came to Jesus as I was, 

Weary, and worn, and sad ; 
I found in him a resting place, 

And he has made me glad. 

I heard the voice of Jesus say, 

Behold, I freely give 
The living water, — thirsty one, 

Stoop down, and drink, and live. 
I came to Jesus, and I drank 

Of that life-giving stream ; 
My thirst was quenched, my soul revived, 

And now I live in him. 

I heard the voice of Jesus say, 

I am this dark world's light ; 
Look unto me, thy morn shall rise, 

And all thy day be bright. 
I looked to Jesus, and I found 

In him my star, my sun ; 
And in that light of life I'll walk 

Till travelling days are done** 

H. BONAR. 



343. 



THE WANDERER BROUGHT BACK 
TO THE FOLD. 

1 Peter xi. 25. 
I was a wandering sheep, 

I did not love the fold ; 
I did not love my shepherd's voice, 

I would not be controlled. 

* From u Spiritual SoDgs." 

303 



304 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

I was a wayward child, 

I did not love my home ; 
I did not love my Father's voice, 

I lov'd afar to roam. 

The shepherd sought his sheep, 

The father sought his child ; 
They follow'd me o'er vale and hill, 

O'er desert, waste, and wild. 

They found me nigh to death. 

Famished, and faint, and lone ; 
They bound me with the bands of love, 

They sav'd the wandering one. 

They washed my guilt away, 

They made me clean and fair; 
They brought me to my home in peace — 

The long-sought wanderer. 

Jesus my shepherd is, 

'Twas he that lov'd my soul ; 
'Twas he that washed me in his blood, 

'Twas he that made me whole. 

— 'Twas he that sought the lost, 
That found the wand 'ring sheep ; 

— '"Twas he that brought me to the fold, 
'Tis he that still doth keep. 

I was a wandering sheep, 

I would not be controlled ; 
But now I love the shepherd's voice, 

I love, I love the fold ! 

I was a wayward child, 

I once preferred to roam ; 
But now I love my Father's voice, 

I love, I love his home !* 

H. BONAR. 

* From " Spiritual Songs." 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 



344. 



COMMUNION WITH SAINTS. 



" Our Lord Jesus Christ, of whom the whole family in 
heaven and earth is named." — Ephesians iii. 15. 

Come, let us join our friends above, 

Who have obtained the prize, 
And on the eagle wings of love 

To joy celestial rise. 

Let saints below in concert sing 

With those to glory gone ; 
For all the servants of our King 

In heaven and earth are one. 

One family, we dwell in him, 

One Church above, beneath ; 
Though now divided by the stream, 

The narrow stream of death. 

One army of the living G-od, 

To his command we bow : 
Part of the host have crossed the flood, 

And part are crossing now. 

Even now to their eternal home 

Some happy spirits fly ; 
And we are to the margin come, 

And soon expect to die ! 

O Jesus ! be our constant guide ; 

Then, when the word is given, 
Bid Jordan's narrow stream divide, 

And land us safe in heaven. 



345. 



HEAVEN. 



We speak of the land of the blest, 
Of that country so bright and so fair, 

And oft are its glories confest, 
But what must it be to be tfa 

x 805 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

We speak of its pathways of gold, 

Of its walls decked with jewels so rare ; 

Its wonders and pleasures untold, 
But what must it be to be there ! 

We speak of its freedom from sin, 
From sorrow, temptation, and care, 

From trials without and within, 
But what must it be to be there ? 

We speak of its service of love, 

Of the robes which the glorified wear : 

The church of the first-born above, 
But what must it be to be there ? 

Do thou, Lord, 'midst pleasure or woe, 
Still for heaven our spirits prepare, 

And shortly we also shall know 
And feel what it is to be there. 



346. 



HEAVEN 



I love to think of heaven, where I shall meet 

My fellow-travellers, and where no more 

With grief or sin my mind will be disturbed, 

Where holy saints and holy angels dwell 

In constant harmony and mutual love. 

But when my heart anticipates the sight 

Of God incarnate, wearing on his side, 

And hands, and feet those marks of love divine 

Which he on Calvary for me endured, 

All heaven is swallowed up in this ; 

And he who is my hope of heaven below, 

Becomes the glory of my heaven above. 

SWAINE. 



347. 



MAXIMS AND SINGLE VERSES. 



self-knowledge. 

Trust not yourself; but, your defects to know, 
Make use of every friend, of every foe. 
306 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 
PERSEVERANCE. 

Despair of nothing which you should attain : 
Unwearied diligence the point will gain. 

TRUE WEALTH. 

Truth, knowledge, wisdom, love, oh ! lay up these 

in store, 
True wealth which we may share, and yet ourselves 

have more. 

IMPORTANCE OF TRIFLES. 

Think nought a trifle, though it small appear : 
Sands form the mountain, moments make the year. 

THE LAW OF GRAVITY. 

That very law which moulds a tear, 
And bids it trickle from its source, 

That law preserves the earth a sphere, 
And guides the planets in their course. 

VALUE OF TLVIE. 

Every moment which idly or wisely we spend, 
Shall form an accuser, or plead as a friend. 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SABBATn ON THE WEEK. 

A Sabbath well spent brings a week of content, 
And health for the toils of the morrow ; 

But a Sabbath profaned, whatsoe'er may be gained, 
Is a certain forerunner of sorrow. 

THE LOST DAY. 

Count that day lost, whose low descending sun 
Views from thy hand no worthy action done. 

EVIL. 

Evil, like a rolling stone upon a mountain top, 
A child may first impel, a giant cannot stop. 

x2 307 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 

FALSEHOOD. 

Oh, what a tangled web we weave, 
When first we practise to deceive ! 

TRUTH. 

Dare to be true, for nothing needs a lie : 

A fault which needs it most grows two thereby. 

CRUELTY. 

So little mercy shows who needs so much. 

LEARNING AND WISDOM. 

Learning is proud that he has gained so much, 
Wisdom is humble that she knows no more. 

UPRIGHTNESS. 

Fear not the consequences of an upright deed : 
More to be feared is sin, though it awhile succeed. 

GENTLENESS. 

Large bounties to bestow, we wish in vain ; 
But all may shun the guilt of giving pain. 

SYMPATHY . 

The tear that is wiped with a little address, 
May be followed perhaps by a smile. 

LOVE. 

We needs must share, if we would keep, 

Our blessings from above ; 
Ceasing to give, we cease to have — 

Such is the law of Love. 

KINDNESS. 

To teach us to be kind, 



Is nature's Jirst, last lesson to mankind. 

KINDNESS TO ANIMALS. 

Let them enjoy their little day, 
Their lowly bliss receive ; 

Oh ! do not lightly take away 
The life thou canst not give. 
308 



PART V.] POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. 
NATURE. 

Nature is but a name for an effect, 
Whose cause is God. 

REDEMPTION. 

A soul redeemed demands a life of praise. 

TRUE RICHES. 

Give what thou canst, without thee we are poor, 
And with thee rich, take what thou wilt away. 

THE TRUE PATH. 

Shun the broadway too readily explored, 
And let thy path be hewn out of the rock — 
The living rock of God's eternal word. 

TRUE LIBERTY. 

He is the freeman whom the truth makes free, 
And all are slaves besides. 

TRUE MORALITY. 

Talk they of morals ? Oh thou bleeding Lamb ! 
Thou Maker of new morals to mankind ! 
The grand morality is love of thee. 

TRUE LIFE. 

" Live while you live," the Epicure would say, 
" And seize the pleasures of the passing day." 
" Live while you live," the holy Preacher cries. 
" And give to God each moment as it flies." 
Lord ! in my life may both united be, 
I live in pleasure when I live to Thee. 

PENETRATION. 

Errors like straws upon the surface flow ; 

He who would seek for pearls must dive below. 

309 



POETRY FOR THE YOUNG. [PART V. 



PITY. 



Still from the prayer of want, and plaint of woe, 

O never, never turn away thine ear ; 
Forlorn in this bleak wilderness below, 

Ah ! what were man, should Heaven refuse to hear ! 

THE SUN-BEAM. 

Sun-beam of summer ! oh ! what is like thee, 

Hope of the wilderness, joy of the sea ? 

One thing is like thee to mortals given — 

The faith touching all things with hues of heaven ! 

"the dayspring from on high.' 7 

As by the light of opening day, 

The stars are all concealed ; 
So earthly pleasures pass away, 

When Jesus is revealed. 



end of part v. 



APPENDIX. 



1. 



2. 



CHILDREN'S GRACES BEFORE AND 
AFTER MEAT. 

Tune — Adeste Fideles. 
Behold us Lord ! a youthful band, 
The sheep of thine all bounteous hand ; 
Bless thou this food thy hand hath given, 
And daily give us bread from heaven. 

Tune — Old Hundredth. 

We praise thy name, eternal King, 
For gifts that from thy bounty spring ; 
May we redeem life's passing days, 
To work thy will and spread thy praise. 

MISS MANN. 

MORNING. 

Morning light is coming ! 

Stars now fade away ; 
Over highest hill-tops 

Brightly glimmers day. 

Nature's feathery songsters 
Loud their notes resound ; 

Lovely flowers are spreading 
Odors all around. 

311 



3. 



4. 



312 



APPENDIX. 

See the silvery dew-drops 
Gleaming on the grass ; 

Bees begin their labor, 
Humming as they pass. 

Morning light ! I hail thee. 

After peaceful rest ; 
Let the song of gladness 

Swell my grateful breast. 

EVENING. 

See, the light is fading 
From the western sky ; 

Day is now departing, 
Night is drawing nigh. 

Evening winds are breathing 
Through the forest green, 

Crimson clouds are wreathing 
In the sky serene. 

Twinkling stars appearing 
All around so bright ; 

Emblems, ever cheering, 
Of eternal light. 

See, the light is fading 
From the western sky ; 

Day is now departing, 
Night is drawing nigh. 

THE RAIN. 

See, the rain is falling 
On the mountain's side ! 

See, the clouds dispersing 
Blessings far and wide ! 

See, the cooling shower 
Comes at God's command. 

Brightens every flower, 
Cheers the parched land. 



5. 



6. 



APPENDIX. 

When the rain is over, 
Then the painted bow, 

O'er the cloudy hill-top, 
Will its colors show ! 

God is ever faithful, 

God is ever true ; 
Let us all be grateful 

For the rain and dew. 

THE BROOK. 

Little streamlet, flowing near 

By the lofty mountain side, 
Ever may thy music cheer, 

Ever may thy wavelets glide. 

Fresh and fair the flowers spring, 

Where thou windest through the glade ; 

Cheerful birds as gaily sing, 

Where thou flowest through the shade. 

Not the rushing, angry foam, 

Playing loud with noise and strife, 

But the smooth and gentle stream 
Be the emblem of my life.* 

SUNSHINE AND SHADOW. 

All yonder in the meadow, 
Is sunshine clear and bright ; 

All yonder in the shadow, 
Is coolness and delight. 

All yonder in the mountain, 
Is active life and health ; 

All yonder in the vallies, 
Is rest and peaceful wealth. 



Primary School Song Book. 



313 



7. 



8. 



314 



APPENDIX. 

All brightly in the heavens, 
The stars at even glow ; 

All lovely bloom the flowers, 
The stars of earth below. 

Than health, or wealth, or flowers, 
Than stars or sunshine bright, 

More sweet, more blest, more lovely, 
When heart and heart unite. 

GOD IS LOVE. 

A MORNING SONG OF PRAISE. 

Lo ! the heavens are breaking, 

Pure and bright above ; 
Life and light, awaking, 

Murmur " God is love." 

See, the streamlet bounding 
Through the vale and wood, 

There its ripples sounding, 
Tell that " God is good." 

Music now is ringing 
Through the leafy grove, 

Feathered songsters singing, 
Warble " God is love." 

Wake, my heart, and springing, 
Spread thy wings above ; 

Soaring still and singing, 
Singing, " God is love.*' 

" MORN AMID THE MOUNTAINS." 

Morn amid the mountains ! 

Lovely solitude, 
Gushing streams and fountains, 

Murmur " God is good." 



APPENDIX. 

Now the glad sun breaking 
Pours a golden flood ; 

Deepest vales awaking, 
Echo, " God is good." 

Wake, and join the chorus, 
Man, with soul endued ! 

He, whose smile is o'er us, 
God, our God is good. 

9. SPRING. 

SONG AFTER RAIN. 

Float away, float away 
O'er land and o'er sea ! 
Dark clouds stray not hither, 
We wait for fine weather. 
Float away, float away 
And welcome the day. 

Fare ye well, fare ye well, 

My books and my play ! 

Of all I am weary, 

The birds warble near me ; 

I'm away, I'm away 

On the wings of the May. 

Float along, float along 
Ye white snowy throng ! 
No longer ye hover 
The green meadows over ; 
To the sea, to the sea, 
haste ye away. 

Oh, the May ! oh, the May ! 

The glad month for me ! 
The birds and the flowers, 
The bright falling showers ; 
I'm away, I'm away 
On the win^s of the Ma v. 



315 



10. 



11. 



APPENDIX. 



SUMMER. 



316 



Days of summer glory, 

Days I love to see ; 
All your scenes so brilliant, 

They are dear to me. 

Let my mind be ever 
Bright as yonder sun ; 

Pure as are the breezes, 
Just as night comes on. 

Meadows, fields and mountains, 
Clothed in shining green ; 

Little rippling fountains, 
Through the willows seen. 

Birds that sweetly warble 
All the summer days ; 

All things speak, in music, 
Their Creator's praise. 

SCHOOL IN THE WINTER. 

Cold the blast may blow, 
Heaping high the snow, 

Winds may loudly roar : 
Trees all brown and bare, 
Sad may wave in air, 

Decked with leaves no more. 

Bosoms firm and bold, 
Fear not storms nor cold, 

Fear not ice nor snow ; 
Fiercely, through the gale, 
Drift the snow and hail, — 

Hearts may warmly glow. 

When in school we meet, 
Looks of welcome greet, 
Sent from smiling eyes ; 



APPENDIX. 

When our teachers dear, 
Give us words of cheer, 
What are wintry skies ! 

Come then rain or hail, 
Come then storm or gale, 

Glad to school well go ; 
Bosoms firm and bold, 
Shrink not from the cold, 

Fear not ice nor snow. 



12. 



THE FROST. 

0, see the cunning frost again 

Its magic art revealing ; 
With bower and hill and shady lane 

Again the windows sealing. 
It shuts from us the clear cold sky, 

The snowy mantled meadow ; 
The icy trees that glitter high 

In sunlight and in shadow. 

And O, it gives full many a dream 

Of pleasant summer rambles ; 
The dear old bridge, the streamlet's gleam, 

The fern, the brakes, the brambles. 
The sedgy lake, the wood-crown'd hill, 

They live again before us ; 
Again flows on the little rill, 

And summer skies are o'er us. 



13. 



GOD SPEED THE RIGHT. 

Now to heaven our prayer ascending, 

God speed the right ; 
In a noble cause contending, 

God speed the right. 
Be our zeal in heaven recorded, 
With success on earth rewarded, 

God speed the right. 

817 



14. 



318 



APPENDIX. 

Be that prayer again repeated — 
God speed the right ; 

Ne'er despairing, though defeated ; 
God speed the right. 

Like the good and great in story, 

If we fail, we fail with glory : 
God speed the right. 

Patient, firm and persevering ; 

God speed the right ; 
Ne'er the event nor danger fearing ; 

God speed the right. 
Pains, nor toils, nor trials heeding, 
And in heaven's time succeeding — 

God speed the right. 

Still our onward course pursuing ; 

God speed the right ; 
Every foe at length subduing ; 

God speed the right. 
Truth our cause, whate'er delay it, 
There's no power on earth can stay it ; 

God speed the right. 



VALUE OF A LOVING WORD. 

A little word in love expressed, 

A motion or a tear, 
Has often healed a heart depressed, 

And made a friend sincere. 

A word, a look, has crushed to earth, 

Full many a budding flower, 
Which, had a smile but owned its birth, 

Would bless life's darkest hour. 

Then deem it not an idle thing, 

A pleasant word to speak ; 
The face you wear, the thoughts you bring, 

A heart may seal or break. 



15. 



APPENDIX. 



HOPE, 



She comes our path to lighten, 

To twine the diamond band ; 
Uniting earth to heaven, 

That happy spirit-land. 
And when her way is darkened, 

She wastes not sigh nor tear, 
But says " a thorn has pierced me, 

So roses must be near." 

When clouds are dark and heavy, 

She lifts her trusting eyes, 
And sees, amid their darkness, 

The bow of promise rise. 
When flesh and strength are failing, 

When powers of nature die, 
She says " My Father calls me 

To mansions in the sky."* 

* Sons: Book of the School Room. 



END OE APPENDIX. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS. 



Animals. 
Beasts.— The Camel, 246 
The Cow, 94 
The Dog, 93, 248 
The Horse, 96 
The Kitten, 92, 249 
The Lambs, 95, 247 
The Squirril, 97 
Birds,— The Bird's Nest, 98, 

99 252 
The Faithful Bird, 250 
The Bird in a Cage, 251 
The Hen and her Brood,' 

108 
The Lark, 100, 101, 253, 

254 
The Lark and Nightingale, 

253 
The Robin, 102,103,104 
The Sea-Bird, 257 
The Sparrow, 106, 107 
The Swallow, 255 
The Thrush, 256 
Insects. — The Busy Bee, 91 
The Patient Bee, 258 
The Butterfly and Bee,259 
The Butterfly, 89 
The Fly, 90 
The Limpet, 260 
Happiness of Animals, 

262, 263 
Instinct, 88 

Instinct and Reason, 261 
Kindness to Animals, 105, 

251, 203 
Affliction, Benefits of, 174 
Attention, 81 

Benediction, 235 
Benefactors, Prayer for a 

Blessing on, 40 
Bible, 30, 31, 55, 212,213, 



214, 234, 282, 308, 312, 
316 
Children by Nature Sinful, 

4, 8, 15 
Christ, his Birth, 170, 244 
His Childhood, 15, 35, 

129 
Life, 1, 33, 34 
Miracles, 174, 175,176, 

177, 178 
Teaching, 122, 173 
Sufferings and Death, 

33, 181, 228,230 
Resurrection and Glory, 

243 
Invitations to Children, 
37, 179 
The Advocate, 228* 
AU-sufiBcient, 229 
The Captain of Salvation, 

223 
The Fountain Opened, 

227* 
The Good Shepherd, 39, 

224 
The Redeemer, 228 
The Refuge, 225* 
The Rock, 227 
The Sun of Righteous- 
ness, 226, 322 
The True Physician, 225 
The Way, the Truth, and 
the Life, 226 
Christmas, 128, 3*21, 322 

Hymn, 244 
Coming to Jesus, 231 
Compassion, 137, 140, 142 
Communion with God, 338 
Communion with Saints, 344 
Conscience, voice of, 46 
Contentment, 12, 140, 330, 
339 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS. 



Death of a Christian Child, 

60 
Death of a Mother, 62 
Death, Happy, 298 
Dress, against Pride in, 135 

Early Piety, 43 

Early Rising, 79, 116, 139 

Easter Hymn for, 243 
Evening Address, 147 
Hymns, 18, 193, 194, 

195, 196, 197, 205 
Lord's Day, 202 
Saturday, 198 
Thoughts, 148, 197, 285, 
286 
Examples from Scripture, of 
Confidence in God, 163, 
169 
^ Faith, 154, 156,166,167 
Examples from Scripture, of, 
Faith bringing forth good 

Works, 1 85 
Filial Piety, 161 
Piety in Youth, 161, 162, 

168 
Piety in Old Age, 171 

Faith in Christ, 231 
Fire, way to extinguish it, 
150 

God, Attributes of, 21, 219 

Love, 297 

Omnipresence, 24, 211 

Omniscience, 41, 42 
The Creator, 21, 22, 25, 

271, 272 
Our Creator, 23, 26 
Our Father, 32 
Our Faithful Friend, 223 
The Giver of every good 

thing, 13, 27, 29 
The God of Providence, 

122 



The Hearer of Prayer, 2, 

3, 16, 324, 325 
God the Lord of all, 53 

Glorying in the Lord, 233 

Grace, 184, 186 

Graces before and after 

Meat, Appendix, 1 
Gratitude, 215, 216, 217, 

218 
Happiness, 12, 186, 265, 

340, 341 
Harvest, 121 
Harvest, thanksgiving for, 

218 
Health, 59 
Heart, Prayer for a new, 8, 

189 
Heaven, 63, 64, 65, 66, 344, 

345, 346 
" Holiness unto the Lord," 6 
Home, 47, 50, 319, 320 
Honesty, 138 
Humility, 206, 253 

Idleness, 139 
Idolatry, 329 
Industry, 91, 146 
Infancy, 133 
Intemperance, 149 

Jew, the Little Wandering, 

142 
Life, a Comparison, 279 
Life, a Journey, 188, 312 

Voyage, 293, 294 
Lord's Day, 19, 199, 200, 

201,202,203 
Love, 50, 51 

Brotherly, 47, 48, 49, 50, 
70, 75, 130, 131 

of our Neighbour, 210 

of Country, 151,305, 306 
307 

of Enemies, 309, 310 



INDEX OF 5UBJE4 fS. 



Loyalty, 151, 152, 307 

Marches,7l,72, 73, 75, 76, 

77, 78 
Martyr, 310 
Maxims, 347 
Meekness, 328 
Missionary Efforts, 142, 143, 
144, 145, 146, 301, 
302, 303, 304 

Hymns, 55,220, 221,222 
Morning, 79, 116 

Hymns, 17, 192, 193, 
20-5, 243 

Monday, 204 
Morning and Evening, 286 

New Year, Hymn for, 242 

Narratives, 134, 135, 136, 
137, 138, 139, 140, 145, 
146, 150, 247, 248, 249, 
250, 299, 300, 308, 310, 
113, 314, 317, 318, 319 
Nature, beauty of, 290 
Natural Objects, 22, 122 
The Air, 28 
The Bud, 112 
The Devvdrop and Sun- 
beam, 264 
The Earth, 280; renewed, 

282 
Flowers, 109, 110, 111, 
112, 113, 114, 265, 
266, 267, 268, 269, 
270, 271 
Fountain of Siloam, 306 
Heavenly Bodies, 25, 123, 

260 
The Moss in the Desert, 

270 
Isle in the Ocean, 279 
Ocean, 295, 296, 297, 

298,299, 300, 301 
Rainbow, 126, 283 
Rivers, &c, 273, 274, 
275, 276 



Natural Objects : — 

Sea of Galilee, 277 

The Snow, 124 

Star, 86 

Star in the East, 321 

Storms, 125, 125* 

The Veil of Mist, 281 

Weather, 72, 78, 262 

Winds, 292 
Neatness, 135 

Obedience, 51, 132 
Orphan, 237 

Parting, 235 

Parents, Duty to, 69, 132, 
133,134, 135, 136 
Separation from, 61, 62 
Perseverance, 83 ; Appen- 
dix, 11, 13 
Praise,7, 29,36,54,59,127, 
191,215,216,217, 230,* 
245 
Prayer, 185,* 187, 326 
Prayer answered, 185 
Prayers for Infants, 4, 5, 8, 
9, 10, 11, 56, 57 
for the Young, 187, 188, 
189, 190, 206, 207, 
208 
for Grace to set our Affec- 
tions on Things above, 
232 
Prayer, secret, 187,* 240 

Ragged School, 313 
Religion, the Blessedness ol, 

67 
Resignation, 238 

Scripture Pieces : — 
Abraham, 156 
Bethlehem, 164 
Birth of Jesus (Song of 
the Angels), 170 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS. 



Scripture Pieces : — 

Blind Man restored, 178 
Brazen Serpent, 159 
Bread, and to spare, 177 
Cain and Abel, 153 
Captive Maid, 168 
Children broughtto Christ, 

179 
Daniel, 169 
David, 163, 164 
Dorcas, 185 

Elisha and the Poor Wi- 
dow, 166 
Elisha and the Shunam- 

mite, 167 
Emraaus, Journey to, 182 
The Flood, 154 
Hagar and Ishmael, 155 
The Happy Convert, 183 
Jesus stilling theTempest, 
176 

Healing the Nobleman's 
Son, 174 

Raising the Widow's 
Son, 175 
Jordan, the Passage over, 

160 
Marah and Elim, 158 
Peter, 185* 
Moses, 157 
Paul, or the Triumph of 

Grace, 184 
Ruth, 161 
Saints in Glory, 186 
Samuel, 162 
Simeon, 171 
Solomon, 165 
Supper at Bethany, 180 
Woman of Samaria, 173 



Seasons, 114, 116,117,118, 
119, 120, 121, 262, 263, 
287,288,289, 291 

Self-Examination, 327 

Senses, 29, 68 

Ship, the, 301 

Sickness, 57, 58, 140, 236 
Recovery from, 59 

Sin no Trifle, 208 

Sincerity, 10, 190 

Songs for Infants, 69, 70, 7 1 , 
72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 
78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 
84, 87, 111, 151, 152, 
and in Appendix 

Soul, immortal, 323 

Spirit, Prayers for the Holy, 
14, 234 

Spirituality of Mind, 232 

Strangers on Earth, 331, 
332 

Time, 53, 240, 242, 258 
Trust in God, 281, 334, 335 
Truth, 29, 44, 45 
Types, 212 

Usefulness, 145, 146, 185 

Walking with God, 337 
Waste, 85 

Way, Broad and Narrow, 
188, 312 
| Way to enjoy beautiful 
Scenery, 290* 
Wisdom, 31 
| Wishes, good, 37, 306 

Youthful King, the, 311 



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5 Ditto, GARDENING, and MISCELLANEOUS SUB- 
JECTS, Is. 6d. each. Darton and Co., Holborn. 
12 Ditto, ON MORAL SUBJECTS, 6d. each. Darton & Co., 
Holborn. 

15 Ditto OF FOREST TREES, 10s. 6d. Darton and Co., 
Holborn. 

lsatsceUaneou£* 

AN ARRANGED BOX OF OBJECTS FOR INFANT 

SCHOOLS, 21. 5s. 
Ditto, TO EXEMPLIFY FORM AND COLOUR, 12s. or 14s. 

Ditto, OF LETTERS TO FACILITATE READING, from 
5s. to 11. 5s. 

EIGHTY SELECT TEXTS ON CARDS, 10s. 

TABLE OF DAILY OCCUPATION FOR INFANT 
SCHOOLS, 2d. each. 



'Any of the above publications may be ordered through the local 
Bookullen, or from the Society's Depository. Catalogues of School 
Apparatus, Books, Prints, fyc , forwarded, post J ree, on application 
at the Depository. Persons wisliing to become Students, to apply 
to the Secretary at the Institution.